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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

Further Education and Training Certificate: Early Childhood Development 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
58761  Further Education and Training Certificate: Early Childhood Development 
ORIGINATOR ORIGINATING PROVIDER
SGB Early Childhood Development   
QUALITY ASSURING BODY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
ETDP SETA - Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
Further Ed and Training Cert  Field 05 - Education, Training and Development  Early Childhood Development 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  140  Level 4  NQF Level 04  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 0695/12  2012-07-01  2015-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2016-06-30   2019-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification replaces: 
Qual ID Qualification Title Pre-2009 NQF Level NQF Level Min Credits Replacement Status
23116  National Certificate: Early Childhood Development  Level 4  NQF Level 04  120  Complete 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

This is an entry-level Qualification for those who want to enter the field of Education, Training and Development, specifically within the sub-field of Early Childhood Development (ECD). Many of those who will seek this Qualification are already practising within the field, but without formal recognition. This Qualification will enable recipients of this Qualification to facilitate the all-round development of young children in a manner that is sensitive to culture and individual needs (including special needs), and enable them to provide quality early childhood development services for children in a variety of contexts, including community-based services, ECD centres, at home and in institutions. In particular, recipients of this qualification will be able to:
  • Plan and prepare for Early Childhood Development.
  • Facilitate and monitor the development of babies, toddlers and young children.
  • Provide care and support to babies, toddlers and young children.

    Practitioners will generally carry out their role under supervision and with the support of designed programmes.

    This Qualification will provide a means for formal recognition of those who are already practising in the field, but without qualifications, as well as for those who wish to enter the field. This qualification will also provide a basis for further professional development in the higher education and training band for many experienced practitioners in the field who have had limited or difficult access to further career development opportunities.

    Rationale:

    Early Childhood Development (ECD) is a priority area within the South African context and is supported by legislation, national policies and strategies. The development of babies, toddlers and young children forms the most critical foundation of further development into childhood and adulthood. There is thus a vast need for ECD services, and it is critical that the field should be served by competent practitioners. In order to meet the needs at ECD level, it is important to be able to identify and recognise competent ECD practitioners who are able to work in a variety of ECD contexts. This qualification will provide a means to give recognition to practitioners at an entry level, thus making it possible for practitioners to increase their employment prospects, and at the same time provide the field with suitably qualified practitioners. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
  • Communication and Mathematical Literacy at NQF level 3 or equivalent.
  • Second language at NQF level 2 or equivalent.

    Recognition of Prior Learning:

    This Qualification can be achieved wholly or in part through recognition of prior learning in terms of the defined exit level outcomes and/or individual Unit Standards.

    Evidence can be presented in various ways, including international and/or previous local qualifications, products, reports, testimonials mentioning functions performed, work records, portfolios, videos of practice and performance records.

    All such evidence will be judged in accordance with the general principles of assessment and the requirements for integrated assessment.

    Access to the Qualification:

    There is open access to this Qualification bearing in mind the learning assumed to be in place. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    The Qualification consists of a Fundamental, a Core and an Elective Component.

    To be awarded the Qualification, learners are required to obtain a minimum of 140 credits as detailed below.

    Fundamental Component:

    The Fundamental Component consists of Unit Standards in:
  • Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 4 to the value of 16 credits.
  • Communication at NQF Level 4 in a First South African Language to the value of 20 credits.
  • Communication in a Second South African Language at NQF Level 3 to the value of 20 credits.

    It is compulsory therefore for learners to do Communication in two different South African languages, one at NQF Level 4 and the other at NQF Level 3.

    All Unit Standards in the Fundamental Component are compulsory.

    Core Component:
  • The Core Component consists of Unit Standards to the value of 64 credits all of which are compulsory.

    Elective Component:

    The Elective Component consists of Unit Standards to the value of 165 credits. Learners are to choose Unit Standards to the minimum of 20 credits.

    1. Those who wish to take up employment as a Grade-R practitioner are advised to take the following Elective Unit Standards:
  • ID 244260: Facilitate a Life Skills Learning Programme in the Reception Year.
  • ID 244257: Facilitate a Literacy Learning Programme in the Reception Year.
  • ID 244256: Facilitate a Numeracy Learning Programme in the Reception Year.

    2. Those who wish to specialise in management of an ECD Service are advised to do the following Elective Unit Standards:
  • ID 242816: Conduct a structured meeting.
  • ID 242812: Induct a member into a team.
  • ID 242819: Motivate and Build a Team.
  • ID 114583: Develop, implement and evaluate a marketing strategy for a new venture.
  • ID 114592: Produce business plans for a new venture.
  • ID 114590: Mobilise resources for a new venture.
  • ID 114585: Plan strategically to improve business performance.
  • ID 114596: Research the viability of a new venture, ideas/opportunities.
  • ID 114593: Tender to secure business for a new venture.
  • ID 244481: Evaluate ECD programmes and services.
  • ID 244478: Manage an ECD service.

    3. Those who wish to specialise in Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment (GEWE) are advised to do the following Elective Unit Standards:
  • ID 117895: Demonstrate how society and socially constructed roles impact on gender attitudes and behaviours and contribute to women's oppression.
  • ID 120036: Analyse the role of institutions in developing and perpetuating gender inequality.

    In addition to this, learners must select additional Unit Standards from other specialisation areas listed in order to obtain a minimum of 20 credits.

    4. Those who wish to specialise in Human Rights are advised to do the following Elective Unit Standards:
  • ID 119661: Demonstrate knowledge of the foundations of human rights and democracy.
  • ID 119662: Describe the relevance of human rights and democratic practices in South African society.

    In addition to this, learners must select additional Unit Standards from other specialisation areas listed in order to obtain a minimum of 20 credits.

    5. Those who wish to specialise in Life Skills are advised to do the following Elective Unit Standards:
  • ID 114938: Describe how to manage anxiety and depression in the workplace.
  • ID 114942: Describe how to manage reactions arising from a traumatic event.

    If learners choose to, it is preferred that the learners achieve the replacement Unit Standard ID 244571 rather than the original ID 114938.

    In addition to this, learners must select additional Unit Standards from other specialisation areas listed in order to obtain a minimum of 20 credits.

    6. Those who wish to specialise in Inclusive Education are advised to do the following Elective Unit Standards:
  • ID 244259: Support children and adults living with HIV and AIDS.
  • ID 13643: Develop learning programmes to enhance participation of learners with special needs.
  • ID 244610: Refer a person with a disability to specialised services. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Communicate in a variety of ways within Early Childhood Development and societal settings.

    2. Use mathematics literacy in real life and education, training and development situations.

    3. Plan and prepare for Early Childhood Development.

    4. Facilitate and monitor the development of babies, toddlers and young children.

    5. Provide care and support for babies, toddlers and young children.

    Critical Cross-field Outcomes:

    This Qualification addresses the following Critical Cross-Field Outcomes, as detailed in the associated unit standards:
  • Identify and solve a variety of problems showing that responsible decisions have been made based on knowledge of Early Childhood Development and teaching practices.
  • Work effectively with others as a member of a team and in co-operation with family members and the community in supporting early childhood development.
  • Organise oneself and one's activities responsibly to manage an effective learning programme that meets the needs and interests of young children.
  • Collect, analyse, organise and critically evaluate information relating to children's needs and progress in the Early Childhood Development programme.
  • Communicate effectively with co-workers, children, their families and community members using visual materials and language skills, mainly verbal but also in writing.
  • Use appropriate technology in making learning resources and solving problems relating children's health and safety, showing responsibility towards the environment.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the holistic and integrated nature of child development and the interaction of various social, economic and environmental systems in creating and solving problems related to providing Early Childhood Development services.

    Developmental outcomes:
  • Reflect on and explore one's own learning strategies and those used by young children.
  • Participate as a responsible citizen in the life of the local community by facilitating the learning and development of its young children in co-operation with families and advocating children's rights to quality learning opportunities.
  • Be culturally and aesthetically sensitive across a range of social contexts by exploring and implementing anti-bias and culture-fair attitudes, values and practices that also involve art, music and dramatic play activities.
  • Explore education and career opportunities in the Early Childhood Development sub-field.
  • Develop entrepreneurial opportunities in setting up and managing Early Childhood Development services, learning basic administrative skills and craft skills in making learning resources. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    The following assessment criteria promote integrated assessment at the Exit Level Outcome level. Further guidance regarding integrated assessment is provided under the heading "integrated assessment":

    Associate Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:
  • Communication within and about Early Childhood Development planning, facilitation, care, monitoring and feedback is clear, understandable and effective.
  • Communication with children and adults is appropriate to their needs and age.

    Associate Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:
  • The tools and concepts of mathematics are used effectively to facilitate planning and management of Early Childhood Development programmes and services.
  • Applications of mathematics in personal and work-related contexts are consistent with the given mathematical processes and principles.

    Associate Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:
  • A practical knowledge of how children learn and develop underpins the planning of a wide range of learning activities and resources to facilitate integrated learning and holistic development.
  • Decisions about children and programme planning are based on knowledge of early childhood development and teaching practices, showing recognition of how personal values, opinions and biases can influence one's judgement.
  • Activities are designed that are stimulating and developmentally appropriate.
  • Space, equipment, materials and the environment are prepared to stimulate children's interest and promote development.

    Associate Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:
  • Facilitation is carried out using a developmentally appropriate range of activities and resources, thus promoting integrated learning and holistic development.
  • Individuals and groups are effectively managed using a range of appropriate techniques.
  • All activities and resources are culture-fair and free from race and gender bias, and are adapted where necessary for children with special needs.
  • Children with disabilities and barriers to learning are helped to participate fully in the Early Childhood Development programme in co-operation with families, health practitioners and specialist agencies.
  • Observations of children are continuous and provide sufficient information to establish patterns of development.
  • Records of child development are useful for contributing towards assessment of individual development, referrals, design of programmes and activities, and evaluation of activities and programmes.
  • Information about children's development and needs are shared with families informally on an individual basis and in more structured group situations based on an understanding of how adults learn.

    Associate Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 5:
  • Safety measures and routine practices for maintaining a clean, safe and healthy environment are implemented throughout the provision of Early Childhood Development services.
  • Children are supervised appropriately for their developmental level in relation to the degree of risk involved.
  • Responses to incidents or accidents are appropriate to the situation.
  • Family members are encouraged to participate in activities with children and/or in activities related to maintaining a good programme.
  • Available resources in the community are used to support the Early Childhood Development programme.
  • Good quality services and the rights of children and families are advocated through working with families, the community and other practitioners.

    Integrated Assessment:

    Evidence of integration will be gained by designing and conducting assessments that ensure the unit standards are assessed in clusters linked to each exit level outcome as identified below. Assessors are to be guided by the detailed specifications indicated in each of the identified unit standards, and further guided by the integrative assessment criteria specified for each Exit Level Outcome above. As far as possible, assessment should take place within the context of an active Early Childhood Development environment, dealing with divergent and random demands related to Early Childhood Development.

    Evidence of integration may be presented by learners when being assessed against the unit standards-thus there should not necessarily be separate assessments for each unit standard and then further assessment for integration at Exit Level Outcome level. Well designed assessments, including formative and summative, should make it possible to gain evidence against each unit standard while at the same time gaining evidence of integration at Exit Level Outcome level.

    For the purposes of integration, assessment should be guided by the following relationships between each Exit Level Outcome and the Associated Unit Standards.

    Unit Standards linked to Exit Level Outcome 3: Plan and prepare for Early Childhood Development:
  • Prepare resources and set up the environment to support the development of babies, toddlers and young children.
  • Prepare Early Childhood Development programmes with support.
  • Design activities to support the development of babies, toddlers and young children.

    Unit standards linked to Exit Level Outcome 4: Facilitate and monitor the development of babies, toddlers and young children:
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of babies, toddlers and young children.
  • Facilitate the holistic development of babies, toddlers and young children.
  • Observe and report on child development.

    Unit standards linked to Exit Level Outcome 5: Provide care and support to babies, toddlers and young children:
  • Work with families and communities to support early childhood development.
  • Provide care for babies, toddlers and young children.

    Assessment should be in accordance with the following principles:
  • The initial assessment activities should focus on gathering evidence in terms of the Exit Level Outcomes and the main outcomes expressed in the titles of the Unit Standards to ensure assessment is integrated rather than fragmented. Where assessment at title level is unmanageable, then the assessment can focus on each specific outcome, or groups of specific outcomes. Take special note of the need for integrated assessment.
  • Evidence must be gathered across the entire range specified in each unit standard, as applicable. Assessment activities should be as close to the real performance as possible, and where simulations or role-plays are used, there should be supporting evidence to prove that the candidate is able to perform in the real situation.
  • All assessments should be conducted in accordance with the following universally accepted principles of assessment:
    > Use appropriate, fair and manageable methods that are integrated into real work-related or learning situations.
    > Judge evidence on the basis of its validity, currency, authenticity and sufficiency.
    > Ensure assessment processes are systematic, open and consistent. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    Introduction:

    The international comparability for the FETC: ECD Qualification is not only informed by finding equivalent qualifications on a national qualifications framework of other countries but also by examining how the FETC ECD benchmarks from best practice in the field. It is necessary to embark on this exercise, as Early Childhood Development (ECD) in the developing world context is still largely located within programmes for community development. This being the case, early care and education has not been fully recognised as an occupation requiring professional knowledge and skills. In what follows we present best practices from countries attempting to make difference in their future citizenry through interventions in early childhood. The choices made were informed by the titles in our Unit Standards and themes that are supportive of our Specific Outcomes and Assessment Criteria. In this document the young child refers to children from birth to five years.

    Kenya:

    Country context and equivalence to South Africa:

    In examining the Unicef country profile the following was deemed comparable to young's realities in the South African context. Although all of them do not deal directly with the birth to four cohort the information, amongst other things, does point to the need for early intervention through recognition of early care and education as an important space:
  • More than 10 per cent of Kenya's 15 million children are orphans; about 650,000 of them have lost parents to HIV/AIDS.
  • Access to ECD services is poor. Most children reside with families and communities and do not attend centre-based provisioning.
  • School enrolment is increasing, but approximately 1.7 million children still do not attend school, largely due to poverty, child labour and truancy by children struggling to maintain orphan-headed households.
  • Nearly a quarter of school-age children have disabilities, but only a small percentage of these children are enrolled in special education classes.
  • Delivery of medical care is poor. In many communities, patients must walk long distances to receive medical care.
  • Illnesses caused by a lack of clean drinking water or sanitation facilities are a problem for children. About 62 per cent of the population has access to improved drinking water sources, and about half the population uses adequate sanitation facilities.

    Best Practice Profile:

    One of the key ways in which Kenya is making a difference in the lives of children in the context of HIV/AIDS is through the Kenyan Orphans Rural Development Programme (KORDP). Two key practices are considered as exemplary within the programme. The community-based approach and psychosocial support underpins the practices with vulnerable children from 2 to 6 years.

    The first way in which KORDP works is through the community to establish an ECD centre. Seven committees are established-food security, income generating activities, education, shelter, health and HIV/AIDS, psychosocial support and evaluations/documentations. Each committee has seven members-involving a significant chunk of the community.

    A community development motivator is trained in providing psychosocial support for ECD committees. Members of these committees are enabled to find the most effective ways of dealing with young children infected, affected and orphaned by HIV/Aids. The aim is get the trainees to carry the message that young children need not only food but also a loving touch and a listening ear. They are encouraged to ask questions such as:
  • How can we create safe and supportive space for children to express themselves?.
  • How do children with HIV/AIDS feel when they are socially shunned?.

    At the Early Childhood Development centres as many as two-thirds of the children have lost at least one parent. Each centre has a trained caregiver. The training includes building competence in early literacy, early numeracy, and basic lessons on health and hygiene. The caregiver also has the responsibility of making referrals to a community nurse who is responsible for treating minor aliments affecting the children and their parents.

    Links to the FETC: ECD Qualification:

    All of the Unit Standards in the FETC: ECD Qualification contribute to building competence that are outlined as best practice above. The following unit standards haves special reference to community development and psychosocial support:
  • Working with families and communities to support Early Childhood Development.
  • Providing care for young children (including the unit standard on HIV/AIDS).
  • Children with special needs form an integral part of the FETC: ECD Qualification.

    India:

    Country context and equivalence to South Africa:
  • India, like South Africa is a pluralistic society. Differences exist in class, gender, geography and caste.
  • With regard to early childhood the Indian government shows political will to eliminate some of the inequalities in Indian society by reducing poverty, increasing public spending on early childhood care and education, speeding the delivery of health services and improving nutrition and food security.
  • Malnutrition affects nearly half of all children under age five.
  • Anaemia affects the vast majority of pregnant women and teenage girls, stunts children's growth and is a leading cause of maternal death and babies with low birth weight.
  • Estimates of the number of people in India living with HIV/AIDS range from 2.2 million to 7.6 million.
  • Diarrhoea, often caused by unsafe drinking water or poor sanitation, is the second leading cause of death among children. Access to clean drinking water has improved in recent years, but 122 million households lack toilets. School enrolment is increasing, but retention and completion rates remain low in part because of the poor quality of the education system, which emphasises memorisation over problem solving.
  • Women face many forms of gender discrimination. A national preference for male children has led to an increasing gap in gender ratios of children under age six, a trend that may be attributed to female foeticide.
  • Despite a national campaign by the government, birth registration rates are low, especially in the poorest regions.

    Best Practice Profile:

    In order to meet the challenges of the holistic needs of the child, India launched the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) in the seventies and continues to operate through this service to date. Recognising that early childhood development constitutes the foundation of human development, ICDS is designed to promote holistic development of children under six years, through the strengthened capacity of families and communities. The programme is specifically designed to reach disadvantaged and low-income groups, for effective disparity reduction.

    The programme provides an integrated approach for converging basic services for improved childcare, early stimulation and learning, health and nutrition, water and environmental sanitation - targeting young children and their parents. These target groups are reached through nearly 300,000 trained community-based Anganwadi workers and an equal number of helpers, supportive community structures/women groups - through the Anganwadi centre (childcare centres), the health system and the community.

    Link with the FETC: ECD Qualification:
  • In the FETC: ECD Qualification the unit standards are designed to develop competence for an integrated approach to early care and education. The key areas of early stimulation, health, safety and nutrition, family and community involvement are embedded within specific Unit Standards.
  • The Qualification is aimed at a wide range of people who facilitate early childhood development.
  • The foundational skills development of an apprenticed/supervised Early Childhood Development practitioner creates good starting points for the professional development of an early childhood teacher who works in an integrated service delivery context.
  • The FETC: ECD Qualification adopts an anti-bias approach.

    Brazil:

    Country context and equivalence to South Africa:

    The following aspects of the Brazilian context show similarity to the realities that challenge early care and education in South Africa:
  • In Brazil, 54 million people live below the poverty line. Although the child mortality rate has fallen it remains disproportional to national production capacity and available technology.
  • Maternal mortality continues to be a problem, although its magnitude is unclear due to a lack of consistent data.
  • The fight against HIV/AIDS continues to shape the realities of young children from birth to eight years.
  • Child survival, development, participation and protection remain challenges.
  • There are many low-income adolescents (teen mothers) with incomplete basic education.
  • The Early Childhood Development programmes are used as vehicles to increase family capacity to participate and strengthen high-quality early stimulation.

    Best Practice Profile:

    The Popular Centre for Culture and Development, an Non Government Organisation based in the south east of Brazil, intervenes in early childhood through combining education with community development in virtual way. The Sementinha project has the following practices that are regarded as exemplary:
  • In the absence of a building called a preschool, education takes place at itinerant venues. Teachers and children meet in church halls, rooms of district association, children's homes and open spaces in the community.
  • Education draws inspirations from the community's culture, knowledge and practices. Children's classroom is the community.
  • Teachers are trained to educate without a school. In particular, they are enabled to be instigators of change, creators of opportunities, formers of citizenship and promoters of generosity.
  • Child participation is encouraged through teachers and children co-constructing meaning using the principles of Paulo Freire - action, reflection, action. Citizenship is promoted as children move through several of spaces in the community.
  • Encourages child, teacher, family and community partnerships.

    Links with the FETC: ECD Qualification:
  • In the Unit Standard Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of young children and Working with families and communities to support child development we include the importance of understanding the socio cultural context in which children live their lives.
  • Within the Unit Standard Plan and Prepare Early Childhood Development supervision and the unit standards on facilitation and assessment we give impetus to reflective practice.
  • The Unit Standard on Facilitation of holistic development emphasises an approach that encourages child participation.
  • The FETC: ECD Qualification is aimed at a wide range of Early Childhood Development practitioners. We believe that their engagement with the different unit standards would enable them to take the role of creators of opportunities for young children and their families. This may well mean creating virtual classrooms.

    Honduras:

    Country context and equivalence to South Africa:

    Within Honduras the following realities show similarities to South Africa with regard to the challenges in early care and education:
  • Sixty-eight per cent of Honduran families are poor, mainly in rural and peri-urban areas. There are significantly more poor families in rural areas (75 per cent) than in urban areas (57 per cent).
  • There are many instances of unemployment and child labour.
  • There is a significant under five mortality rate.
  • Poverty and HIV/AIDS are serious challenges to full implementation of the principles in the Convention on the Rights of the Child.
  • Gender inequality exist.

    Best Practice Profile:

    The Early Stimulation Programme is part of a larger programme implemented by the Christian Children's Fund. The programme focuses on children from birth to six years and their families. Exemplary practices include the following:
  • A holistic approach to young children's development.
  • Attention is drawn to both home-based and centre-based activities.
  • The home-visitor model enables women from communities to be trained as "mother guides". These guides enable parents to work around the gross and fine motor skills, cognitive skills, language, socio-affective skills, health, hygiene and personal safety. Preschool caregivers work in centre provisioning around these areas. Children have access to quality interventions either in the family context, a centre or both.

    Links with the FETC: ECD Qualification:
  • The approach to young children in the Early Stimulation Programme relates directly to the type of knowledge base we expect our Early Childhood Development practitioners to engage with in the unit standard Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of development of young children.
  • The unit standards Plan and prepare Early Childhood Development programmes under supervision, Facilitate the holistic development of young children and Observe and report on child development shape competence in facilitating early stimulation through knowledge of the whole child.
  • Since an integrated approach informs the unit standards it creates possibilities for developing competence in working in partnerships with experienced teachers, families and communities.
  • Although the qualification is aimed at an apprenticed supervised worker, we are aware that in the South African realities it might well be that the practitioner may work independently. This is most likely as a home visitor working directly with families on early stimulation.

    United Kingdom:

    The FETC: ECD Qualification was compared with the Early Years Care and Education Level 2 NCVQ/SCVQ (National Council for Vocational Qualifications/ Scottish Council for Vocational Qualifications) in the United Kingdom for the following reasons:
  • It is directly comparable for level and is an outcome based qualification, requiring candidates to produce evidence of competent performance in the workplace based on knowledge, understanding and values and has a strong.
  • The structure of the qualification includes mandatory and optional units similar to the FETC: ECD Qualification Core and Electives.
  • The Level 2 is aimed at people working under the supervision of others e.g. assistants in nurseries or schools or playgroups, crèches, mothers' helps which is the same level of responsibility at which FETC: ECD Qualification is aimed.
  • There is high compatibility between the principles underpinning the two qualifications:
    > Welfare of the child.
    > Keeping children safe.
    > Working in partnership with parents/families.
    > Children's learning and development (holistic, play-based, observation of children).
    > Equality of opportunity (access, avoidance of stereotyping, inclusion).
    > Anti-discrimination.
    > Celebrating diversity.
    > Confidentiality.
    > Working with other professionals.
    > The reflective practitioner.

    Similarities and Differences:
  • FETC: ECD Qualification Unit Standard Title Core.
  • Early Years Care And Education Level 2 Mandatory Units.
    > Comments.
  • Prepare resources and set up the environment to support the development of young children.
  • Maintain an attractive, stimulating and reassuring environment for children (Physical environment, Prepare and maintain displays, Reassuring environment).
    > Similar to outcome of Set up the learning environment but less focus on resourcing and none on identifying activities.
    > Provision of equipment and materials and activities is an aspect of both Implement planned activities for sensory and intellectual development and Implement planned activities for the development of language and communication skills.
  • Prepare Early Childhood Development programmes under supervision.
  • No equivalence.
    > There is no specific requirement for analysis in the NQVC: Which is important even in the FETC Level 3 Plan and Prepare programmes. My impression is that the role of assistant in the NQVC context is somewhat different from what we mean by under supervision. It is likely that these workers are assisting in the same classroom as a more qualified teacher.
    > This supports the Level 5 for this standard.
  • Design activities to support the development of young children.
  • No equivalent at Level 2 or Level 3 though there is provision of activities to be selected within a plan for Implement planned activities for sensory and intellectual development.
  • There is no specific requirement for analysis in the NQVC- which is important even in the FETC Level 3 Plan and Prepare programmes. My impression is that the role of assistant in the NQVC context is somewhat different from what we mean by under supervision. It is likely that these workers are assisting in the same classroom as a more qualified teacher.
    > This supports the Level 5 for this standard.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of young children.
  • Underpinning knowledge specified in most the NQVC units includes an understanding of child development of different kinds e.g. attachment, social skills development, sensory and motor development but this appears to be presented as uncontested fact rather than theorised.
  • Facilitate the holistic development of babies, toddlers and young children.
  • Support children's physical development needs (help children to toilet and wash hands, help children when eating and drinking, support opportunities for children's exercise, support children's quiet periods).
  • Support children's social and emotional development (help children adjust to new settings, help children relate to others, help children to develop self-reliance and self-esteem, help children to recognise and deal with feelings, assist children to develop positive aspects of their behaviour).
  • Implement planned activities for sensory and intellectual development (provide activities, equipment and materials for creative play; play games with children; assist children with cooking activities; provide opportunities for manipulative play; examine objects of interest with children).
  • Implement planned activities for the development of language and communication skills (implement music lessons, implement and participate in talking and listening activities, select and use equipment and materials to stimulate role play, select and display books, relate stories and rhymes).
  • Has an interactive focus but activities are planned by supervisor.
    > Relate to several aspects of facilitation but are more focused to particular areas of development and/or types of activities such as we had in the range statement.
  • Observe and report on child development.
  • Work with families and communities to support early childhood development.
  • Relate to Parents (Interact and share information, share the care of children with parents).
    > Support parents in developing their parenting skills, a Level 3 option is closer working with families and communities including parenting support and linking with resources.
  • Provide care for young children.
  • Maintain the safety and security of children(Safe environment, supervision, emergency procedures, cope with accidents and injuries, help protect children from abuse)
  • Support children's physical development needs.
    > Correlates with safety aspects of FETC: ECD standard.
    > Includes, some aspects of hygiene, nutrition, illness, routines.
  • Contribute to the achievement of organisational requirements(carry out instructions, give feedback).
    > Assistant is involved in routine maintenance of child care programmes (no equivalent).

  • FETC: ECD Unit Standard Title Elective.
  • Early Years Care and Education Level 2 Optinal.
    > Comments.
  • There are no comparable electives-special needs is at a higher Level.
  • Monitor, store and prepare materials and equipment.
    > Administrative and technical support getting materials ready no equivalent.
  • Feed Babies.
    > Bottles, formula, food.
    > Basic knowledge of development in first year.
  • Provide for babies' physical development needs.
    > Washing, nappies, dressing, stimulating, cleaning nursery.
    > Stimulation outcome accords with some of facilitate holistic development of babies, toddlers and young children.
  • Contribute to the effectiveness of work teams.
    > Unit forms part of several care qualifications where people work in teams-Similar to working in a Team SO of phased out Managing the ECD Learning Programme.
  • Work with parents in a group.
    > Inform parents, encourage them to participate in group functions and children's activities.
    > Some similarity to work with families but limited to the group around the child care setting.

    The Early Years Care and Education Level 2 qualification covers many of the same elements as the proposed FETC ECD-a strong focus on health and safety, and on interactions with children which respect their developmental level and support their development. While both qualifications are designed for a worker in an assistant role, the assistant in the UK context is clearly working within a much more structured situation with more direction and a selection of activities. The role includes many prescribed care routines.

    The FETC: ECD Qualification requires more initiative and independence from the Early Childhood Development practitioner in terms of designing activities, observing and assessing children, planning and preparing the environment. In the South African context, our practitioners are working in a less supported environment and need to be able to undertake these tasks.

    Competence for a wider age range is required in FETC: ECD Qualification (note that the baby standards are options in the Early Years qualification). This was justified by numbers of younger children coming into child care as five year olds move into the formal schooling system.

    Conclusion:

    All our Unit Standards for the FETC: Early Childhood Development Level 4 have strands that are considered to be best practice in a developing world context. The issues facing early care and education in the countries selected create certain dimensions to building foundational competence at an entry point into training. These dimensions are deemed important as we make strides in professionalising early childhood development. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    Learners can move horizontally through the following qualifications:
  • ID 20838: National Certificate, ABET Practice, NQF Level 4.
  • ID 50332: Futher Education and Training Certificate, ODETD, NQF Level 4.
  • ID 23094: Futher Education and Training Certificate, Development Practice, NQF Level 4.

    Learners can move vertically by using this qualification as the basis for the following qualifications:
  • ID 23118: National Certificate or Diploma in ECD, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 20159: National Diploma, ABET Practice, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 20478: Professional Diploma, Education, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 50331: National Certificate or Diploma ODETD, NQF level 5.
  • ID 49710: National Diploma Development Practice, NQF Level 5. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Providers offering learning towards this qualification or the component unit standards must be accredited by the appropriate ETQA.
  • Moderation of assessment will be overseen by the appropriate ETQA according to moderation principles and the agreed ETQA procedures. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Assessors must be registered in terms of the requirements of SAQA and the appropriate ETQA. 

    NOTES 
    As per the SAQA decision, after consultation with the Quality Councils, to re-register all qualifications and part qualifications on the National Qualifications Framework that meet the criteria for re-registration, this qualification has been re-registered from 1 July 2012.
    This Qualification replaces Qualification 23116, "National Certificate: Early Childhood Development", Level 4, 120 credits. 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  244468  Prepare resources and set up the environment to support the development of babies, toddlers and young children  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  244462  Work with families and communities to support Early Childhood Development  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  244484  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of babies, toddlers and young children  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  244480  Facilitate the holistic development of babies, toddlers and young children  Level 4  NQF Level 04  16 
    Core  244475  Observe and report on child development  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  244472  Prepare Early Childhood Development programmes with support  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  244469  Provide care for babies, toddlers and young children  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Core  244485  Design activities to support the development of babies, toddlers and young children  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  119472  Accommodate audience and context needs in oral/signed communication  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119457  Interpret and use information from texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119467  Use language and communication in occupational learning programmes  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119465  Write/present/sign texts for a range of communicative contexts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9015  Apply knowledge of statistics and probability to critically interrogate and effectively communicate findings on life related problems  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119462  Engage in sustained oral/signed communication and evaluate spoken/signed texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119469  Read/view, analyse and respond to a variety of texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  9016  Represent analyse and calculate shape and motion in 2-and 3-dimensional space in different contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119471  Use language and communication in occupational learning programmes  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  7468  Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal, business, national and international issues  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119459  Write/present/sign for a wide range of contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  117895  Demonstrate how society and socially constructed roles impact on gender attitudes and behaviours and contribute to women's oppression  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  244571  Describe how to manage anxiety and depression in the workplace  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  114938  Describe how to manage anxiety and depression in the workplace  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  114942  Describe how to manage reactions arising from a traumatic event  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  242812  Induct a member into a team  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  244259  Support children and adults living with HIV and AIDS  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  120036  Analyse the role of institutions in developing and perpetuating gender inequality  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  242816  Conduct a structured meeting  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  119661  Demonstrate knowledge of the foundations of human rights and democracy  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  119662  Describe the relevance of human rights and democratic practices in South African society  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114583  Develop, implement and evaluate a marketing strategy for a new venture  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114590  Mobilise resources for a new venture  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  242819  Motivate and Build a Team  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  114585  Plan strategically to improve business performance  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114592  Produce business plans for a new venture  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114596  Research the viability of new venture ideas/opportunities  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114593  Tender to secure business for a new venture  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  13643  Develop learning programmes to enhance participation of learners with special needs  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  244481  Evaluate an Early Childhood Development (ECD) service  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  244260  Facilitate a Life Skills Learning Programme in the Reception Year  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Elective  244257  Facilitate a Literacy Learning Programme in the Reception Year  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Elective  244256  Facilitate a Numeracy Learning Programme in the Reception Year  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Elective  244478  Manage an Early Childhood Development service  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  244610  Refer a person with a disability to specialised services  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    When qualifications are replaced, some (but not all) of their learning programmes are moved to the replacement qualifications. If a learning programme appears to be missing from here, please check the replaced qualification.
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Quality Assuring Bodies have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Quality Assuring Body should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. 3 At Work Recruitment Agency 
    2. A Assessor Registered 
    3. Abasunguli Training Specialists 
    4. Access Employment Skills & Development Agency 
    5. ADvTECH Resourcing Pty Ltd t/a Corporate College International 
    6. AGB Mathe Business Services 
    7. Asakhane ECD Training Centre 
    8. Bopaditshaba Training Services 
    9. Candy Nxusani Trading 
    10. Custoda 
    11. D M Human Resource Dynamics t/a D M Management and Consulting 
    12. Develo cc 
    13. Directflo 
    14. Dream For All Trading Pty Ltd 
    15. Dru-A Professional Training Consultancy 
    16. Early Inspiration 
    17. EDU-Bless College 
    18. Elective Training Institute Enterprise CC 
    19. Elgin Learning Foundation 
    20. Environment and Language Education Trust 
    21. Eureka Varsity Pty Ltd 
    22. Faka Ihlombe Investments (PTY) Ltd 
    23. Falcon Business Institute (Pty) Ltd 
    24. FLAVIUS MAREKA 
    25. Future Performance Training and Development 
    26. Grassroots Adult Education and Training Trust 
    27. Igugu Training and Investments 
    28. Institute of Training and Education for Capacity Building 
    29. Iscariota Trading Enterprise cc 
    30. Isibani Community College 
    31. Itireleng Bokamoso Training and Development 
    32. Katlehong Early Learning Resourse Unit (KELRU ) 
    33. Khanimamba Training and Resource Centre 
    34. Khululeka Community Education Centre 
    35. Kids Academy 
    36. Kitso Bokamoso Training Solution 
    37. KITSO TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT SERVICES 
    38. Klein Karoo Resource Centre 
    39. KWAZULU NATAL EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE 
    40. Lathibha Training & Development Services 
    41. Leap Projects 
    42. Learning For Sustainability 
    43. Lesedi Educare Association 
    44. Letlhokoa Management Services CC 
    45. Mary Hope Health Care 
    46. Masikhule Early Childhood Development Centre 
    47. MD Goba & Associates 
    48. Mnambithi FET College - Ladysmith Campus 
    49. Motheo Training Institute Trust 
    50. MTL Training and Projects 
    51. NCHEBEKO SKILLS CONSULTANCY 
    52. New Beginnings Training and Development Organisation 
    53. Northern Cape Rural Public FET College - Kathu Campus 
    54. Northlink College - Tygerberg Campus 
    55. NTATAISE 
    56. Ntataise Lowveld Trust 
    57. Ntevho-Ketso Training and Recruitement Consultancy (PTY) Ltd 
    58. Pro-Ed Training cc 
    59. Professional Child Care College 
    60. Read Educational Trust 
    61. Retshetse Training Project 
    62. SAFE AND SOUND LEARNING ASSOCIATION 
    63. SANTS College 
    64. Siragelaphambili Abet Skills Development 
    65. Siyathela Early Learning Association 
    66. Siyathuthuka Nursery School 
    67. South African Congress For Early Childhood Development 
    68. South Cape Public FET College - Oudtshoorn Campus 
    69. Spotru Training Centre (PTY) Ltd 
    70. SPS Consulting (Pty) Ltd 
    71. Teachers Learning Centre cc 
    72. Tembe Service Providers 
    73. The Port Elizabeth Early Learning Centre 
    74. Thusanang Early Childhood and Community Development 
    75. Thuto Botshabelo Training Academy 
    76. TLHALEFO SKILLS DEVELOPMENT CC 
    77. Training and Resources in Early Education (TREE) 
    78. Tshepang Educational Centre 
    79. Vuselela FET College - Potchefstroom Campus 
    80. WESTERN COLLEGE FOR FURTHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING 
    81. Wkids Training Institute (Pty) Ltd 
    82. Woz'obona Early Childhood Community Service Group 
    83. X Simelane and Associates 



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