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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

National Certificate: Warship Command and Control 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
58783  National Certificate: Warship Command and Control 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Maritime Defence 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
SAS SETA - Safety and Security SETA  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Certificate  Field 08 - Law, Military Science and Security  Safety in Society 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  192  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2023-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2024-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

This qualification is aimed at people who are working within an Officer Training Programme with a view to being recognised as fully-fledged Commanding Officers. Typically, they will be people in SAN training schemes, developing their skills towards this qualification. Learners may also already be warfare officers or Executive Officers who wish to develop their skills for command. In particular this qualification will be useful for:
  • Warship Safety Officers (Bridge Watch).
  • Warfare and Principal Warfare Officers (Surface or sub-surface).

    This qualification is designed to be flexible and accessible so that people are able to demonstrate the competencies required to work safely and productively at a strategic level in a surface operations environment. Recipients of this qualification will have knowledge and skills to assume command of a warship.

    Recipients of this qualification will be able to:
  • Communicate effectively in a leadership role.
  • Navigate and/or handle the ship.
  • Execute maritime operations.
  • Manage Damage Control and Safety Activities.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the legal aspects of maritime operations.
  • Demonstrate understanding of SANDF regulations and Force Preparation procedures pertaining to warship management.

    Commanding Officers will carry out their role within the context of:
  • Set SAN operational procedures.
  • Given administration systems.
  • Given Naval doctrine.
  • Given tactical procedures.
  • The framework of the Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC) and current rules of engagement.

    Rationale:

    The Defence Force has taken the decision to align its training of personnel to qualifications registered on the NQF. The SA Navy (SAN) wishes to provide for the recognition of key clusters of leadership and management competencies, which coincide with SAN command requirements.

    The majority of the learners for this qualification are likely to have completed the qualifications and training dealing with warship safety management and bridge watch-keeping within a naval context and, one of the areas of specialisation (anti-air, anti-surface and sub-surface warfare) within warfare operations management. This qualification will give learners the opportunity to develop and balance their practical skills with the essential knowledge needed to earn a formal qualification in Warship Command and Control.

    Learners may either access this qualification as warfare and principal warfare officers, or as watchkeepers and officers with extensive experience on board, but without extensive practical operational knowledge and skill, and this qualification provides for this eventuality.

    A decision has also been made that the SAN must comply with, or exceed, international maritime standards. Traditionally, SAN training has been of a high standard in defined areas, but has not always produced people capable of working at the levels required by international maritime license requirements for ship Masters. The qualification recognises and makes provision for these additional requirements.

    In addition, the policy of the Defence Force, as part of a broader skills development process in South Africa, wishes to provide for mobility of its personnel (Learners) and for portability of competencies and learning obtained from one qualification to another where at all possible.

    A further consideration is that, for transformation purposes, large numbers of generally poorly educated and trained people need access to high quality learning and assessment opportunities if they are to meet the requirements of the maritime sector in general, and the SAN in particular. The possibilities for incremental learning, which builds on generic officer training, must be created if the SAN is to make the equitable distribution of skills a reality. This qualification will assist the SAN to meet this objective.

    Finally, there are people who have been working in the SAN for some time, and who have gained the additional skills and expertise required through systematic on-the-job training. This qualification and its constituent unit standards can make an invaluable contribution to personal and SAN skills development by providing for the recognition of the skills gained in this manner, through a systematic RPL process.

    In summary, the rationale for this qualification and its constituent unit standards is to:
  • Describe the standard required for competent command performance in the Defence Force and international arena.
  • Provide clear guidelines and "targets" for SAN and other training providers, which also promotes accountability.
  • Provide a means to recognise prior learning in a formal way.
  • Provide access and progression via coherent learning pathways for mariners and officer trainees wishing to consider a career in naval warfare.
  • Provide access to learners formerly denied opportunities for a career in maritime defence, which in turn promotes personal (and thus national) skills development. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
  • It is assumed that learners are competent in Mathematics and Science at NQF Level 4.
  • The international Language in the maritime sector (Navy and merchant marine) is English and it is assumed that Learners are competent in English at NQF Level 4.

    Recognition of Prior Learning:

    There is a critical need in the SAN to identify people from different demographic and gender backgrounds who have a sound foundation in seamanship and warship safety management (alongside and bridge watchkeeping), and who have begun to specialise in one of the aspects of warship operations management (air, surface and sub-surface). This qualification will provide them with the opportunity to have the specific and complex skills demanded of those who manage warships at a strategic level recognised within a safety conscious and highly regulated sector.

    This qualification also recognises that there may be learners who are already warfare officers or Executive Officers with extensive experience of on-board operation, and who would like existing skills recognised so that they can gain access to further development opportunities, and provides for this eventuality.

    Evidence can be presented in various ways, including international and/or previous local qualifications, products, reports, testimonials mentioning functions performed, work records, portfolios, videos of practice and performance records.

    All such evidence will be judged in accordance with the general principles of assessment described above and the requirements for integrated assessment.

    This qualification can therefore be obtained in whole or in part through a process of RPL.

    Access to the Qualification:

    Access to this s qualification is open to all learners in possession of a National Senior Certificate with Mathematics and Science, or equivalent qualification.

    It is preferable that learners first complete a Watchkeeping Certificate or a Qualification in Warship Operations Management. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    Fundamental:
  • All fundamental Unit Standards totalling 18 credits are compulsory.

    Core:
  • All Core unit standards totalling 171 credits are compulsory.

    Elective:
  • Learners are to choose unit standards totalling 3 credits from the unit standards listed as elective.
  • To be awarded the whole qualification, learners must complete the unit standards specified above and obtain a minimum of 192 credits.
  • Should learners exit the qualification without completing the whole qualification, recognition may be given for unit standards successfully completed. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Communicate effectively in a leadership role.

    2. Navigate the ship.

    3. Execute maritime operations.

    4. Manage safety and damage control activities.

    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal aspects of a command role.

    6. Demonstrate understanding of SANDF regulations and Force Preparation procedures pertaining to warship management.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:
  • This qualification addresses all the Critical Cross-Field Outcomes, as detailed in the associated unit standards. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:
  • A range of communication principles, strategies and processes are applied to support effective communication and enhance meaningful interaction with key personnel.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:
  • Navigational planning and execution is directed, within the constraints of prevailing weather conditions and sea state, in such a way that the ship's position is consistent with plan at all times.
  • The ship is manoeuvred effectively and safely in a range of specific operations.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:
  • Planning of all missions, military and peacekeeping support, is done thoroughly and provides an effective basis for decision-making and execution.
  • Missions are executed so as to comply with legislative requirements and international agreements and regulations.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:
  • Damage is managed in a manner that supports the safe and effective operation of the platform within the bounds of acceptable risk.
  • Actions to limit, control and/or repair damage are decisive and effective, in accordance with established procedures.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 5:
  • Political implications of actions are appreciated in relation to mission and/or peace support operations.
  • Actions are taken that are consistent with international agreements, treaties and regulations.
  • Command role is executed in ways that support South Africa's position in the region.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 6:
  • Knowledge of vessel systems and capabilities is accurate and sufficient to support decision-making with respect to the principles of fight, move and float.
  • The ship and ship systems are monitored against agreed criteria for the required state of readiness, and actions maintain or improve readiness state, as required.
  • Planning and preparation is thorough and makes provision for effective operations in accordance with established procedures.

    Integrated Assessment:

    Assessment should take place within the context of:
  • Given Quality Assurance policies, procedures and processes.
  • A guided and supported learning environment.

    Assessment will take place according to the detailed specifications indicated in the unit standards associated with each exit level outcome (see "associated unit standards" above).

    Over and above the achievement of the specified unit standards, evidence of integration will be required as per the following broad criteria, all within the context of an active learning environment.

    Assessors should note that the evidence of integration could well be presented by learners when being assessed against the unit standards-thus there should not necessarily be separate assessments for each unit standard and then further assessment for integration. Well designed assessments should make it possible to gain evidence against each unit standard while at the same time gain evidence of integration.

    Assessment should be in accordance with the following general and specific principles:
  • The initial assessment activities should focus on gathering evidence in terms of the main outcomes expressed in the titles of the unit standards to ensure assessment is integrated rather than fragmented. Where assessment at title level is unmanageable, then the assessment can focus on each specific outcome, or groups of specific outcomes.
  • Evidence must be gathered across the entire range specified in each unit standard, as applicable. Assessment activities should be as close to the real performance as possible, and where simulations or role-plays are used, there should be supporting evidence to prove that the candidate is able to perform in the real situation.
  • All assessments should be conducted in accordance with the following universally accepted principles of assessment:
    > Use appropriate, fair and manageable methods that are integrated into real work-related or learning situations.
    > Judge evidence on the basis of its validity, currency, authenticity and sufficiency.
    > Ensure assessment processes are systematic, open and consistent. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    The STCW Code (Seafarer's Training, Certification and Watchkeeping Code) as adopted by the 1995 Conference of the International Maritime Organization recognises the specific roles and responsibilities of a Master. It lays down duties and responsibilities and provides standards and criteria for the learning and assessment of Masters of vessels of 500 gross tonnage or more. Signatories to the Convention include some 71 countries, amongst them leading seafaring nations such as: Argentina, Australia, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, India, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Russian Federation, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

    Areas of specified competence include:
  • Plan a voyage and conduct navigation.
  • Determine position and resultant accuracy of the position fix by any means.
  • Determine and allow for compass errors.
  • Coordinate search and rescue programmes.
  • Establish watchkeeping arrangements and procedures.
  • Maintain safe navigation through the use of radar and ARPA and modern navigation systems to assist decision-making.
  • Forecast weather and oceanographic conditions.
  • Respond to navigational emergencies.
  • Manoeuvre and handle a ship in all conditions.
  • Operate remote controls of propulsion plants and engineering systems and services.
  • Monitor the loading, stowage, securing, care during the voyage and the unloading of cargoes.
  • Inspect and report defects and damage to cargo spaces, hatch covers and ballast tanks.
  • Plan and ensure the safe loading, stowage, securing, care during the voyage and the unloading of cargoes.
  • Assess reported defects and damage to cargo spaces, hatch covers and ballast tanks and take appropriate action.
  • Carriage of dangerous goods.
  • Control trim, stability and stress.
  • Monitor and control compliance with legislative requirements and measures to ensure safety of life at sea and the protection of the marine environment.
  • Maintain safety and security of the ship's crew and passengers and the operational condition of life-saving, fire-fighting and other safety systems.
  • Develop emergency and damage control plans and handle emergency situations.
  • Organise and manage the crew.
  • Organise and manage the provision of medical care on board.

    United States:

    The US Navy Officer Training curriculum includes the following areas:
  • Engineering: Candidates are introduced to the fundamentals of naval propulsion plants. These include steam, nuclear, gas turbine and diesel. In addition, candidates will be introduced to the basic theories of electrical distribution systems, hydraulic systems, evaporator plants, air conditioners and refrigeration systems.
  • Military Indoctrination: During military indoctrination candidates are taught basic military customs and courtesies, basic uniform assembly and requirements, inspection procedures and training requirements.
  • Naval History: Subjects include the history of the Navy from the Revolutionary War to the present, theories on sea power, the influence of geography, the elements of strategic deterrence, maritime strategy and a quantitative and qualitative comparison of US and foreign navies.
  • Navigation: Navigation training consists of dead reckoning, coastal piloting, Rules of the Road and electronic navigation. Candidates are required to plot simulated movements and positions of a ship at sea. Candidates receive practical application training aboard a yard patrol (YP) training ship in the Seamanship and Navigation phase of training.
  • Seamanship: Seamanship training at OCS familiarizes candidates with naval terminology, equipment and various deck operations. Candidates are acquainted with fiber lines, wire ropes, anchors and anchor chains as well as the supervision of their safe use. The different types of rigs used by ships under way in refueling and replenishment at sea are introduced. Candidates learn to use the maneuvering board and how to put this knowledge to practical use when sailing.
  • Damage Control: The damage control curriculum is designed to familiarize candidates with the types of damage, which can occur in the naval environment due to accidents, warfare and nautical disasters. Damage control also includes instruction in fire fighting theory and prevention of different kinds of fires common to sea, shore and air commands. It also includes principles of chemical, biological and radiological warfare defense. Practical demonstrations of flooding control are given in a mock-up of a shipboard space.
  • Naval Leadership: Subjects include leadership qualities, motivational theories, team building, management skills, decision-making, goal setting and action planning, and communication processes and public speaking skills. Candidates have many opportunities through practical application to demonstrate leadership skills.
  • Division Officer: Subjects include military rank structure, performance evaluations, educational programs, enlisted records, classified material handling, naval correspondence, officer designations, promotions, junior officer administrative duties, pay and allowances and advancement.
  • Military Law: Subjects introduced include the Military Code of Conduct, The Geneva Convention, the Uniform Code of Military Justice, investigations, non-judicial punishment, court-martial procedures, apprehensions, jurisdiction, pretrial restraints, administrative discharges and claims.
  • Naval Warfare: During this phase candidates study the equipment, shipboard spaces and weapons used in various operations. Amphibious, Mine, Strike, Electronic, Submarine, Surface, and Air warfare tactics will be studied. Candidates also examine the problems of detection and learn the weapons systems used in various types of combat.
  • Special Emphasis Program: Subjects include suicide awareness and prevention, Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor (DAPA), Human Resources and Safety Programs, counterespionage and AIDS briefings.

    Conclusion:

    The particular qualification in question is one that falls within a highly regulated sector where all parties operating ocean-going vessels have set and agreed to comply with standards key roles charged with the safety of shipping.

    The SAN's own approach is that the first stage of training for Commanding Officers should comply with STCW codes, and care has been taken to align this qualification with the provisions of the Code.

    The proposed National Certificate: Warship Command and Control NQF Level 6 complies with the requirements of the IMO STCW Code, and is similar to qualifications operating in allied Navies internationally. The Royal Navy are regarded as the leaders, and the SAN has closely followed the British approach. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    The qualifications for the navy have yet to be developed, so articulation at present is limited but includes qualifications in the merchant marine.

    Horizontal articulation is possible with the following qualification:
  • National Diploma: Maritime Studies, NQF Level 6.

    Vertical articulation is possible with the following qualifications:
  • National Higher Diploma: Maritime Studies, NQF Level 7. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Providers offering learning towards this qualification or the component unit standards must be accredited by the relevant ETQA.
  • Moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA according to moderation principles and the agreed ETQA procedures. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Assessors must be:
  • Registered as assessors with the relevant ETQA.
  • Be in possession of a relevant qualification at NQF level 7 or have at least 3 years relevant experience in the maritime sector. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  244540  Conceive and direct the required state of operational readiness  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244546  Control trim, stability and stress  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  117985  Demonstrate an understanding of the Law of Armed Conflict during multi-national operations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  118027  Demonstrate an understanding of the planning process at the operational level  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  13 
    Core  120040  Demonstrate understanding of the concepts of operational command and control  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244524  Demonstrate understanding vessel systems and capabilities  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244532  Determine position of the vessel and the accuracy of the resultant position  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244525  Ensure compliance with pollution prevention measures  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244538  Establish health and safety systems for vessel and crew  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244528  Establish watchkeeping arrangements and procedures  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244536  Forecast weather and oceanographic conditions  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  244526  Manage safe navigation through the use of radar and other navigational aids  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244530  Monitor compliance with legislative requirements and measures to ensure safety of life at sea  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244549  Operate remote controls of propulsion plant and engineering systems and procedures  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244533  Conduct military missions in accordance with national and naval doctrine  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Core  244547  Develop emergency and damage control plans and handle emergency situations  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Core  244544  Direct damage control activities  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Core  244548  Execute a peace support operation  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Core  244542  Manage vessel operations  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  10 
    Core  244535  Manoeuvre and handle the ship under all conditions  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  16 
    Core  244510  Organise and manage the crew  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Core  244545  Organise and manage the provision of medical care on board a vessel  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Core  244531  Plan voyage and conduct navigation  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Core  244527  Respond to navigational emergencies  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  10 
    Fundamental  115329  Develop competent officials  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Fundamental  119919  Manage resources within military operations  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  15 
    Elective  114846  Demonstrate an understanding of the historical, political, social and economic realities of South Africa  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Elective  15093  Demonstrate insight into democracy as a form of governance and its implications for a diverse society  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  114862  Explain South Africa's role in Africa and SADC countries  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  244520  Manage a hydrographic survey  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  244522  Control, conduct and respond to search and rescue operation  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.