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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

Bachelor of Public Administration 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
62151  Bachelor of Public Administration 
ORIGINATOR
Management College of Southern Africa (MANCOSA) 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
CHE - Council on Higher Education  HEQSF - Higher Education Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National First Degree  Field 03 - Business, Commerce and Management Studies  Generic Management 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  360  Level 6  NQF Level 07  Regular-Provider-ELOAC 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 091/21  2021-07-01  2023-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2024-06-30   2029-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

The qualification will equip graduates to work as able business administrators, and will equip them to study further in the same or a related field. The essence of what a graduate will know is described below, in the description of the exit-level outcomes of the programme, which patently promotes the objectives of the NQF.

Rationale:

The mission of the Management College of Southern Africa (MANCOSA) focuses on the provision of affordable, accessible and accredited management programmes. The Bachelor of Public Administration (BPA) will provide access to higher education to persons wanting to make careers in the Public Service and will complement the existing accredited qualifications that MANCOSA offers.

The programme offers persons in employment the opportunity to improve their qualifications and become empowered in their quest to be managers and administrators in the Public Service.

The public administration degree is of special interest to the working professional in public and not-for-profit organizations and those who wish to pursue a career in public management. The course work is designed to provide the student with an understanding and working application of the principles essential to the effective management of all public agencies. The Bachelor of Public Administration (BPA) program is designed for aspiring and mid-career professionals at all levels of government; those working in nonprofit, service, and educational organizations, and for-profit professionals who work with public agencies or who desire to pursue a career in the public sector.

The programme also contributes to the human resource development needs of the Southern African region. The envisaged MANCOSA programme is in line with catering for the needs of students in employment in and aspiring to employment in the public sector in Southern Africa through a flexible supported distance-learning programme.

The programme will address the issue of shortages of qualified personnel and contribute to the development of ethical practices and good governance in the public sector. 

LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
The student will need to be in possession of the knowledge normally acquired in studying for an appropriate FETC. As the medium of instruction of the programme is English, the student will need to be able to read and write fluently in that language, and as much of the work in the programme is mathematical in nature the student will be expected to have a good command of NQF Level 4 mathematics before entering the programme.

Recognition of Prior Learning:

The qualification may be obtained as a whole or in part through the student's engaging in MANCOSA's process for the recognition of prior learning.

Access to the qualification

Candidates for admission to the programme are required to have an appropriate FETC or an equivalent, or to have passed one of the Certificates offered in the MANCOSA Open Learning programme. No additional qualifications or experience are required. The programme will accept candidates straight from school or those who have been in employment for a number of years, regardless of their current employment status. Candidates who do not qualify for admission in terms of any of the above but who feel that they are adequately equipped to cope with the programme will be invited to apply for admission through a process of RPL involving detailed motivation of the candidate's ability to succeed, and a process of reflection and portfolio production facilitated by a member of the MANCOSA staff. Students in possession of the MANCOSA Diploma in Advanced Management will be admitted into the programme with exemption from certain parts of the curriculum. 

RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

QUALIFICATION RULES 
The qualification consists of 22 modules of 15 credits each, giving a total of 330 credits (each credit being the equivalent of 10 hours of notional study time). In addition, there is a project carrying 30 credits. This gives a final total of 360 credits for the programme. The level of the programme is pitched at NQF Level 6.

Learning Components; Number of credits allocated; NQF Level:
  • Fundamental; 120 Credits; NQF Level 4 and 5.
  • Core; 210 Credits; NQF Level 5 and 6.
  • Elective; 30 Credits; NQF Level 6.

    Total = 360 Credits.

    The table below gives the detailed Programme Structure:

    Year 1:

    Fundamental Components:
    Semester; Module Name; Credits:
  • One; Economics 101; 15 Credits.
  • One; Communication 101; 15 Credits.
  • One; Public Law 101; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Information Technology 102; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Values and Ethics in the Public Sector 102; 15 Credits.

    Core Components:
    Semester; Module Name; Credits:
  • One; Public Administration 101; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Public Administration 102; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Local Government 102; 15 Credits.

    Year 2:

    Fundamental Components:
    Semester; Module Name; Credits:
  • One; Introduction to Politics 201; 15 Credits.
  • One; Organisational Theories 201; 15 Credits.

    Core Components:
    Semester; Module Name; Credits:
  • One; Public Administration 201; 15 Credits.
  • One; Local Government 201; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Public Administration 202; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Public Sector Human Resource Management 202; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Public Financial Management 202; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Local Government 202; 15 Credits.

    Year 3:

    Fundamental Components:
    Semester; Module Name; Credits:
  • One; Research in the Public Sector 301; 15 Credits.

    Core Components:
    Semester; Module Name; Credits:
  • One; Public Administration 301; 15 Credits.
  • One; Local Government 301; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Public Administration 302; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Local Government 302; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Strategic Management in the Public Sector 302; 15 Credits.
  • Two; Project; 30 Credits.

    Except for IT 101, all of the modules with code numbers beginning with 100 or 200 are pitched at level 5 at least. (Some of them are worthy of being pitched at Level 6 on the NQF-old style.) All of the modules with code numbers beginning with 300 are pitched at level 6 on the NQF (old style-NQF Level 7 in the New Academic Policy). A student is therefore required to take at least 120 credits at the exit level of the qualification.

    A schema of the array of modules making up the qualification would look as follows:
  • Accounting 101; Bus Com 102; Accounting 201, 202: Project 300 (30 credits).
  • Business Management 101, 102; Business Management 210, 202; Business Management 301, 302.
  • Bus and Society 101, Economics 102; Economics 201, 202; Economics 301, 302.
  • IT 101; Statistics 102; Business IS 201; Statistics 202.

    Two of the Electives 310, 320, 330.
  • The fundamental components amount to 120 credits, 15 at NQF Level 4 and 105 at NQF Level 5.
  • The core components amount to 210 credits; 105 of them at NQF Level 5 and 105 at NQF Level 6.
  • The electives amount to 30 credits at NQF Level 6.

    An award of the Management College of Southern Africa (MANCOSA) will be conferred when the following conditions are satisfied:
  • The candidate was an enrolled and registered student of or at the College at the time of his or her assessment for an award and was not in debt to the College.
  • Details of the candidate's full name, date of birth, sex, programme and award have been registered by the College.
  • It has been confirmed that the candidate has completed a programme of study approved by the Examinations Board as leading to the award being recommended.
  • The award has been recommended by a Board of Examiners convened, constituted and acting under regulations approved by the Academic Board and including members approved as external examiners for the programme.
  • The recommendation of the award has been signed by the Chair of the Board of Examiners and by the Examinations Officer, confirming that the assessments have been carried out in accordance with the College's requirements. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    The curriculum consists of 360 credits progressively arrayed in 30 modules over a minimum of 3 years of study. Students must pass a particular module before proceeding to the consecutively numbered module with the same title. Six of the modules (90 credits) are fundamental. Three of the modules (among the modules comprising the 'majors') are electives, of which the student is required to take three. And the Project is the capstone module.

    All students take the same (fundamental and core) modules in the first two levels of the curriculum. These modules induce the students to learn the basic skills which the programme demands, to understand the theoretical core of the disciplines of Economics and Business Management, and to understand something of the context in which these disciplines are practised. At the third level all students take 30 credits in Economics, 30 credits in Business Management, and a further 30 credits made up of a choice of elective 15-credit modules in Business Management and/or Economics. A student will therefore be able to take what would effectively be a double major degree, or a single major degree with a minor in the discipline not selected. The student is also required to round off the degree programme by doing a 30-credit Project demonstrating mastery of the discipline(s) selected.

    Students will be informed that they may request permission to replace any appropriate one of the modules other than the capstone Project with a project in experiential learning, to be conducted under the remote guidance of a facilitator designated by MANCOSA. The learning to be derived from the experiential learning project will have to relate closely to the learning required of students taking the module to be replaced.

    The numbering of modules suggests the increasing complexity of the material contained in them. Evenly numbered modules are to be offered in the second semester, and oddly numbered modules in the first. Students will not be permitted to proceed to consecutively numbered modules with the same title without passing the previous modules in the sequence.

    The modules are as follows.

    Accounting 101, 15 credits (fundamental):

    This module familiarises the student with recording, classifying and interpreting financial data for a business. It includes a study of the journals, ledgers and financial statements used by these entities. It also covers credit instruments, depreciation of plant assets, internal control, liabilities, and partnerships, as well as a study of the journals, ledgers and financial statements used by service and merchandising businesses.
    By the end of this module a student will be able to classify and interpret financial data for a business.

    Accounting 201, 15 credits (core):

    This module is a continuation of the work performed in Accountancy 101. It covers a study of short-term assets, inventories, long-term assets, current liabilities, the partnership and corporate form of ownership, long-term liabilities, the statement of cash-flows, financial statement analysis, and long-term investments.
    By the end of this module a student will be able to understand and work with the accounts of a variety of business entities.

    Accounting 202, 15 credits (core):

    This module continues the work performed in Accountancy 101 and 201. It covers a study of managerial accounting including cost allocations for activity-based costing and product costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, variable costing, budgeting, standard costing operating and capital decision making analysis.
    By the end of this module a student should be able to demonstrate the ability to keep the accounts of a simple business entity, and to read and grasp the essence of the accounts of a variety of more complex business entities with sufficient accuracy to be able to take appropriate managerial decisions.

    Business and Society 101, 15 credits (fundamental):

    This module constitutes an introductory study of the impact of societal influences and ethical considerations on business decision-making. Topics will include-business ethics; corporate responsibility and accountability; income inequality; price controls and subsidies; management and labour; ethnicity and business; women in business; non-profit organisations; business and activism.

    At the conclusion of the module students will be expected to be able to analyse and evaluate current changes in work and society in a broad disciplinary and conceptual framework, and to identify and trace in relation to business management the major forces for change in society, with special reference to their current manifestations and trends.

    Business Communication 102, 15 credits (fundamental):

    This module focuses on the presentation of concepts in a concise, complete manner in memos, letters and reports. Topics dealt with include composing, editing and revising reports and proposals, and other business-related communications including resumes and letters of application. The module also addresses reading skills, including the comprehension and evaluation of challenging materials.

    At the conclusion of the module students will be expected to be able to read and clearly understand business communications in their fields, and to write clear and precise business communications in a variety of forms.

    Business Information Systems 201, 15 credits (core):

    The overriding purpose of this module is to give students the theoretical underpinning they need to link together their knowledge of business environments and the use of IT in business, but the student will also be expected to develop her or his practical computer skills. Topics will include the systems development life cycle (SDLC); security; backup; networks; an introduction to programming; further spreadsheets; the nature and use of data-management systems for administrators and end-users; principles of sound data management; word-processing; and the internet.

    At the end of the module the student will be able to discuss typical IT solutions for practical business, to outline the electronic tools which help managers to manage, and to describe the issues involved in operating a secure, legal IT environment. Students will be also able to use a word-processing package, and to plan, design, create and use spreadsheets and databases.

    Business Management 101, 15 credits (core):

    This module introduces students to the field of study of business management, focusing on the management environment, the management process, and the evolution of management theory.

    At the conclusion of the module students should be able to understand some of the theoretical content of business management and discuss it critically in relation to certain simple selected situations that might arise in the context of managing a business.

    Business Management 102, 15 credits (core):

    This module exposes students to an array of organisational structures and theories in relation to central and strategic management. It also involves students in the study of functional areas of management, including operations management, marketing management, human resource management and financial management.

    At the end of the module students should be able to understand and discuss organisations and organisational theory, and to propose solutions to a variety of more complex problems that might arise in the course of managing a business.

    Business Management 201, 15 credits (core):

    This module will develop students' insight into the nature of business management through consideration of the role of leadership in management, the role of groups and teams, and ways of motivating them. It will also briefly consider the importance of managerial communications and information technology.

    By the end of the module students should be able to evaluate and critically discuss various modes of management, and display an understanding of some of the factors essential to reaching sound managerial decisions.

    Business Management 202, 15 credits (core):

    This module expands a student's knowledge of business management by situating it in a global environment, by considering the development of management strategies especially in relation to change, and the management of information.

    At the conclusion of this module students should be able to demonstrate a detailed grasp of the nature of business administration in a variety of contexts, especially the global perspective, and to demonstrate the ability to evolve and describe management strategies relating to a variety of aspects of business management.

    Business Management 301, 15 credits (core):

    This module will focus students' attention on managing conflict and change in the context of managerial ethics and corporate social responsibility. It will also examine the related topic of industrial relations, with particular reference to the relevant legislative framework.

    At the conclusion of the module students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the need to address issues of change and conflict with honesty and sympathy, in the context of the relevant regulatory environment.

    Business Management 302, 15 credits (core):

    This module will deal with the notion of an organisational culture, and the elements that go to make up such a culture. It will in that context address the need for management of workforce diversity and the promotion and monitoring of quality in the organisation and its work.

    At the conclusion of the module students should be able to demonstrate that they have a firm grasp of the elements of organisational culture, and to analyse and make effective recommendations relating to hypothetical situations pertaining to issues in organisational culture.

    Business Management 310, 15 credits (elective):

    This module will focus on the nature of entrepreneurship and issues relating to small business management in general. Various related topics will receive attention during the course of the study. These will include topics such as start-up, business plans, finance options, and franchises.

    At the conclusion of the module students should demonstrate that they are able on paper to set up and run a small business successfully.

    Economics 102, 15 credits (fundamental):
    Principles of Microeconomics:

    This module introduces core definitions, concepts and tools for understanding economics and economic decision-making at the micro level. Students will be able to understand the principles of the market mechanism, the market forces of demand and supply, their elasticities and interactions, and apply them to management and economic problems. Students will also be able to understand basic theories of consumer behaviour, production and costs, market structures, pricing and distribution, including collection bargaining and wage determination across different labour market structures, and apply these to the analysis of managerial situations and decision making.

    Economics 201, 15 credits (fundamental):
    Principles of Macroeconomics:

    This module introduces and develops the concepts of demand, supply, output, income, expenditure and price levels, and requires the student to understand these concepts fully. Students are required to understand the processes and outcomes of macro policy making in South Africa, and their impact on the individual firm. To this end students are required to grasp the circular flow of economic activity in open and closed economies in the context of classical Keynsian and neo-Keynsian theories. Students are required to engage in the debate of growth vs development, and to demonstrate that they can collect elementary secondary/economic data using conventional measures of macroeconomic trends. Students are also required to demonstrate that they can relate macro- to microeconomic factors in reaching management decisions for private firms.

    Economics 202, 15 credits (core):
    Monetary and Public Economics:

    Students are introduced to the concepts of money, money supply, and measures of money. They grasp basic theories of money and the meaning, significance and role of monetary policy, in which context they understand the role of central and commercial banks. Students are thus able to analyse the South African banking structure, and its role and impact on organisations. Students are also made aware of the process, role and impact of monetary policy formulation in South Africa, and are given a brief overview of monetary policies in other countries, of the World Bank, and of the IMF.

    In the section devoted to Public Economics students understand the meaning and role of fiscal policy and its role in the modern economy. They are required to be able to describe the workings of the fiscal tools such as taxation, expenditure, and borrowing. They are required to be able to analyse the role and impact of fiscal policy in South Africa.

    Students are also made aware of the processes of lobbying and budget formulation. As a result they should be able to analyse recent national, provincial and local budgets and understand their economic impact on a manager's decision making at the organisational level.

    Economics 301, 15 credits (core):
    International Economics:

    This module explains classical and modern international trade theories so that a student understands the basis of trade and why trade is inevitable. Students are made to understand the problem of comparative cost differences and purchasing power parity, and their relevance in the modern economy.

    The workings of foreign exchange rates, their determination and fluctuation, and related concepts such as arbitrage, hedging and speculation, are explored with the help of everyday examples. Students are led to an understanding of the implications of foreign trade for the domestic economy through considering the role of imports and exports, their impact on domestic prices, arguments for free or protected trade, and the statement of the balance of payments. Students are expected to be able to analyse different statements of the balance of payments and to understand their impact on the organisation and the work environment.

    Economics 302, 15 credits (core):
    Southern Africa in the Global Economy:

    In this module students become familiar with the local, national, regional and global environment in which the manager and her organisation operate. They are given a statistical description of the Southern African economy in terms of various economic indicators, and are expected to be able to analyse a range of economic issues and problems from a historical, current and futuristic perspective. Students are also required to demonstrate that they have a sufficient grasp of the global economy to be able to analyse its impact on the local economy.

    Economics 310, 15 credits (elective):
    Development Economics:

    Students learn theories and models of economic growth and development with the characteristics of developing and developed economies, from the perspectives of income distribution, poverty, unemployment, population, urbanisation, and foreign aid. Students are thus able to characterise the role of their organisations in the context of the development of national, regional and global economies.

    Economics 320, 15 credits (elective):
    Quantitative Economics:

    Students are taught the use of quantitative methods which include mathematical models, input-output analysis, game theory, constrained optimisation, differentiation, and probability theory in solving decision-making problems with a quantitative perspective. Students are expected to be able to apply this econometric methodology in decision-making at the organisational level.

    Information Technology 101, 15 credits (fundamental):

    NB: Students will be required to attend and be awarded a certificate of competence in an appropriate programme offered by a provider of IT education to whom they have physical access. The choice of provider must be approved by MANCOSA. MANCOSA will thereafter accept the provider's certificate of competence issued to the student as satisfying the requirements of this module.

    The syllabus of a course which may be accredited as fulfilling the requirements of this module will ideally include an introduction of the student to the role that computers play in modern society, fundamental knowledge of the components of a computer and input/output devices, and of the factors determining the acquisition of appropriate computers in business. The student will also be able to demonstrate the possession of skills relating to word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, and the use of networks to a level sufficient to fulfil the requirements of the other modules in this learning programme.

    Project 300, 30 credits (capstone-core):

    In this module students undertake a project which provides them with a foundation on which to build future research, though which they are enabled to take rational, informed decisions in their professional lives.

    Students conduct a research project integrating disciplines and theoretical approaches studied during the course of the programme as a whole. They are expected to base their work on a problematic real or hypothetical department or process in an organisation or firm, to analyse the situation they have selected for attention (demonstrating an ability to work with secondary data, and showing evidence of the ability to conduct an empirical investigation), and to arrive at recommendations for alleviating the situation or improving the productivity of the selected department.

    The student's work must demonstrate the student's ability:
  • To think and work independently
  • To gain knowledge of and understand a business problem
  • And to apply sound business and economic principles to a work situation.

    Statistics 102, 15 credits (fundamental):
    Introduction to Probability and Statistics:

    The aim of this module is to provide a basic understanding of the quantitative methods used in business. Topics to be dealt with will include population samples, the presentation of data, probability, random variables and their distribution, the point and interval hypothesis, significance tests, regression, and correlation.
    At the conclusion of this module a student should be able:
  • To appreciate sources of data and survey methods.
  • To summarise data both graphically and by summary statistics.
  • To use appropriate statistics with bivariate data.
  • To understand basic forecasting techniques.
  • To appreciate the use of index numbers.
  • And to use appropriate statistical spreadsheet facilities.

    Statistics 202, 15 credits (fundamental):
    Introduction to Estimation Procedures:

    The aims of this module are to provide a basic understanding of the quantitative methods used in business, and to introduce the topics of business analysis and modelling. Topics to be dealt with include the design of sample surveys, the design of experiments and analysis of variance, sampling, goodness-of-fit tests, and non-parametric statistics.

    At the conclusion of this module students should be able:
  • To use simple probabilities appropriate to business problems.
  • To apply the binomial and poisson distributions to appropriate business problems.
  • To use standard normal distribution tables.
  • To understand and set up simple confidence intervals.
  • To apply a single sample test to a set of data.
  • And to use appropriate statistical spreadsheet facilities.

    What outcomes must learners demonstrate overall and in each section?

    Exit level outcomes are organised into a number of groups which together reflect the work of a competent business manager and which are together tested in the capstone module, the Project. The exit level outcomes relating to electives will apply and be assessed only where students have chosen those electives in completion of the curriculum. The critical outcomes are integrated into the exit level outcomes.

    1. Outcomes relating to fundamental learning, where the competencies are not subsumed in core modules that follow:

    1.1 Demonstrate the ability to interpret and use numerical and statistical knowledge in facilitating the learner's own further learning and the management of a business (relates to Statistics).

    1.2 Demonstrate the ability to read with understanding and to write in such a way that others understand the learner's writing (relates to Communication Skills).

    1.3 Demonstrate the ability to display ethical behaviour in business situations. Competence is evident when candidates are able (relates to Ethics).

    2. Demonstrate the ability to use and understand conventional accounting processes, and to take appropriate managerial decisions on the basis of such understanding (relates to financial management).

    3. Demonstrate the ability to manage the human resource and labour relations functions of a small or medium business organisation (relating to human resource management).

    4. Outcomes relating to general management:

    4.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the economic context in which businesses are situated, and the ability to relate that context to management functions.

    4.2 Demonstrate an understanding of and the ability to manage selected day to day management functions of a business enterprise.

    5. Demonstrate an understanding of and the ability to use computerised business information systems in the day-to-day management of a business ( relates to information systems).

    6. Demonstrate the ability to perform research in the field of business management and to make appropriate recommendations arising from the research (relates to research). 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Competence is evident when candidates are able:

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcomes 1.1:
  • To show through written discussion and problem solving that they understand the terminology and basic methods of statistics.
  • To perform simple statistical functions accurately. These functions include the display, interpretation and manipulation of data.
  • To report the results of these statistical operations accurately and concisely.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcomes 1.2:
  • To show through written discussion that they are able clearly to understand business communications in their field.
  • To show that they are able to write clear and precise business communications in a variety of forms.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcomes 1.3:
  • To show through written discussion evoking a broad disciplinary and conceptual framework that they understand the relationships between aspects of the economy and societal comity.
  • To show through written discussion that they have a grasp of the factors driving societal change and their impact on businesses and business management.
  • To show through written analysis of one or more hypothetical situations that they understand the ethics of the issues involved.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcomes 2:
  • To prepare an accurate financial statement for a business.
  • To show through written discussion that they understand the books of account and financial statements of more complex business entities.
  • To show through written exposition that they are able to take appropriate managerial decisions on the basis of information conveyed by such books of account.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcomes 3:
  • To analyse and plan for the person power needs of a business enterprise.
  • To show through written discussion that they understand the imperative of workforce diversity and are able to manage compliance to that requirement.
  • To show through written analysis of a hypothetical situation that they are able to understand and manage the interpersonal conflicts and stresses that arise from change in the workplace environment.
  • To show through written exposition relating to a hypothetical situation that they are able to plan and manage the quality control aspects of a business entity.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcomes 4.1:
  • To demonstrate in writing an understanding of the elements of microeconomics, and that they are able to take them fully into account in a hypothetical business management situation.
  • To show through written discussion that they grasp the nature and impact on business entities of policy making at a national and regional level, and are able to take such matters as changing monetary policy and fiscal policy into account in taking business decisions.
  • To show that they understand and are able to take into account matters having to do with international trade, such as the balance of payments, foreign exchange rates, and comparative cost differences.
  • To engage in an informed fashion in the growth vs development debate and to take appropriate strategic business decisions on the grounds of their understanding of the issues involved.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcomes 4.2:
  • To show through written analysis of a hypothetical situation that they are able to think strategically in matters pertaining to business management.
  • To show through written discussion of situations pertaining to a hypothetical business entity that they will be able to manage most common operations functions.
  • To show though analysis of a hypothetical situation that they understand the relation between leadership and team work, and that they might be able to motivate a workforce productively.
  • To show through analysis and consequent discussion that they are able to propose solutions to a variety of relatively complex problems that might arise in the course of managing a business entity.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcomes 5.
  • To show through written discussion that they understand the terminology and functions of computerised information systems.
  • To show that they can apply computer use in business information systems.
  • To show through written discussion of a hypothetical situation that they are able to propose appropriate solutions to practical business problems relating to or arising from the use of computerised information systems.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcomes 6:
  • To perform a sustained exercise in quantitative research in the field of business management.
  • To show through the performance of such an exercise that they have mastered the methodology of quantitative research in the field of business management.
  • To write up their research accurately and appropriately.
  • To draw conclusions and make appropriate recommendations arising out of their research.

    Integrated Assessment:

    As this is an international distance education programme the opportunities for using a variety of assessment tools are very limited. Students will be assessed on one assignment and one examination per module, except in the outsourced IT 101 module, where students will be required only to demonstrate competence in the skills required (in a test situation controlled by the providers to whom the module has been outsourced), and in the capstone Project 300, where students' research reports/dissertations will be the sole objects of examination. Where a student is allowed to replace a module with a project in experiential learning, the assessor will again assess only the final report. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    The programme was designed in accordance with the principles enunciated in Chapters Three and Four of the DoE publication A Qualification Structure for Universities in South Africa, Report 116, DoE (96/02). In addition, the draft programme was benchmarked against the programmes of a number of institutions, the details of which are available on the internet. The Institutions whose programmes were most particularly taken into account were:
  • Anderson College.
  • The University of Canberra (Asian Institute of Management).
  • The University of South Australia.
  • The University of Texas of the Permian Basin. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    The programme articulates vertically with the MBA, MANCOSA's flagship programme, and with other such postgraduate qualifications at other institutions of higher learning. It is designed to receive students with an FETC of equivalent, or from one of MANCOSA's Open Learning programmes, which are SAQA-accredited 120-credit FET programmes as follows:
  • Certificate in Business Management.
  • Certificate in Human Resource Management.
  • Certificate in Entrepreneurship.
  • Certificate in Local Government Administration.
  • Certificate in Bookkeeping.

    The programme articulates horizontally with the MANCOSA Diploma in Advanced Management, a 180-credit level 5 programme consisting of modules with the following titles:
  • Management Principles.
  • Financial Management.
  • Marketing.
  • Labour Relations.
  • Personnel Management.
  • Project Management.
  • Training and Development.

    Diplomats with this qualification will be in a position to apply for admission to the BBA programme and for exemption from credits in those modules of the BBA programme which most closely resemble modules they have completed in the Diploma programme. The BBA programme also articulates horizontally with first-degree programmes in the Faculties of Commerce at other South African higher education institutions. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • There is no established professional body to take responsibility for moderation of a programme such as this. A PHEI offering a BBA has therefore to make its own arrangements, as appropriate.
  • Assessors will be appointed only if they have relevant qualifications superior to those they are assessing. In addition, every effort will be made to recruit assessors who are well experienced in assessing students' work at this level.
  • External examiners/moderators are appointed only if they fulfil the above requirements and are significantly senior in their professions. In addition, a balance will be sought between professional academics and active businessmen and women. The appointment of assessors and moderators will be the responsibility of the Programme Committee charged with responsibility for managing the BBA programme. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    To qualify as an assessor an individual must:
  • Generally have a Higher Education qualification at least one level higher than the course being assessed.
  • Be appropriately qualified and experienced as assessors.
  • Generally be the tutor responsible for that particular module.
  • Be in the possession of qualifications that are relevant to the programme.

    The following criteria are used for appointing external examiners and moderators:
  • Their experience of examining this programme or its equivalent.
  • Their independence from MANCOSA and from the programmes team.
  • Their expertise in the subject area.
  • Their scholastic contribution to the field.

    External examiners and moderators are required to have a qualification at least 1 Level higher than the programme being assessed. They are also required to have at least 2 years experience lecturing in this programme or its equivalent. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2009; 2012; 2015. 

    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. Management College of Southern Africa (MANCOSA) 



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