SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED UNIT STANDARD THAT HAS PASSED THE END DATE: 

Construct and maintain infrastructure 
SAQA US ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE
8368  Construct and maintain infrastructure 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Nature Conservation 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY
-  
FIELD SUBFIELD
Field 01 - Agriculture and Nature Conservation Nature Conservation 
ABET BAND UNIT STANDARD TYPE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
Undefined  Regular  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
REGISTRATION STATUS REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE SAQA DECISION NUMBER
Passed the End Date -
Status was "Reregistered" 
2004-12-02  2007-12-02  SAQA 1657/04 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2008-12-02   2011-12-02  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This unit standard does not replace any other unit standard and is not replaced by any other unit standard. 

PURPOSE OF THE UNIT STANDARD 
The qualifying learner assessed as competent against this unit standard will be able to construct and maintain infrastructure usually associated with or found on conserved areas. This competence contributes to the effective management of the area and enhanced tourism. Achieving this unit standard will enhance the qualifying learner's employability in a numbers of sectors. 

LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
First Aid certificate. 

UNIT STANDARD RANGE 
Guides to the scope and complexity of the specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge are provided in bullet points beneath each. These are prefaced by "for example" since they are neither comprehensive nor necessarily appropriate to all contexts. Alternatives must however be comparable in scope and complexity.
These are intended only as a general guide to scope and complexity of what is required. 

Specific Outcomes and Assessment Criteria: 

SPECIFIC OUTCOME 1 
Maintain basic infrastructure on a protected area. 
OUTCOME NOTES 
  • Maintain appropriate infrastructure; buildings; machinery and equipment, according to a maintenance plan and within a given budget. 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit Standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which practitioners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment; formative and summative assessment.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a practitioner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent. Similarly, if a practitioner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.


    Method of Assessment:

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-realistic, out-of-classroom simulation.


    Integrated assessment:

    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity.
  • Work out how practitioners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment. 
  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
  • Direct observation - watch the practitioner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions
  • Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the practitioner
  • Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the practitioner to demonstrate in a simulated environment
  • Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard
  • Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (eg: reports from a third party)
     

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 2 
    Repair leaks, blockages, inoperable plumbing equipment (sewerage) and construct ablution facilities 
    OUTCOME NOTES 
  • Do basic repair work to plumbing such as fixing leaks; unblock stoppages; replacing tap washers and taps.
  • Building of water borne and biological / bacterial toilet facilities. Construction of septic tanks and french drains. Erection of showers etc. 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit Standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which practitioners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment; formative and summative assessment.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a practitioner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent. Similarly, if a practitioner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.

    Method of Assessment:

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-realistic, out-of-classroom simulation.


    Integrated assessment:

    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity.
  • Work out how practitioners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment. 
  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
  • Direct observation - watch the practitioner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions
  • Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the practitioner
  • Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the practitioner to demonstrate in a simulated environment
  • Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard
  • Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (eg: reports from a third party)
     

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 3 
    Repair gas appliances and replace lights and fuses. 
    OUTCOME NOTES 
  • Do basic maintenance on gas equipment such as change gas bottles; clean jets in geysers, lights and stoves; repair leaks in gas lines.
  • Maintain electrical system by changing light bulbs; checking circuit breakers and referring repair work to qualified personnel. 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit Standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which practitioners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment; formative and summative assessment.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a practitioner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent. Similarly, if a practitioner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.


    Method of Assessment:

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-realistic, out-of-classroom simulation.


    Integrated assessment:

    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity.
  • Work out how practitioners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment. 
  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
  • Direct observation - watch the practitioner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions
  • Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the practitioner
  • Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the practitioner to demonstrate in a simulated environment
  • Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard
  • Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (eg: reports from a third party)
     

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 4 
    Do basic carpentry, bricklaying, painting, paving and barricading. 
    OUTCOME NOTES 
  • Laying out buildings; casting foundations; raising walls and plastering them. Making roof trusses and erecting them and affixing various roof types.
  • Mix and throw various concrete mixes for various applications such as simple flooring and paving; reinforced concrete and the use of shuttering.
  • Preparing the area to be paved using various paving techniques with various paving materials and boarders. Erect wood and steel barricades.
  • Paint various surfaces including brick; plastered walls; wood and steel surfaces. Includes the application of primers and sealing layers as well as different finishing layers. 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit Standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which practitioners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment; formative and summative assessment.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a practitioner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent. Similarly, if a practitioner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.


    Method of Assessment:

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-realistic, out-of-classroom simulation.


    Integrated assessment:

    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity.
  • Work out how practitioners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment. 
  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
  • Direct observation - watch the practitioner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions
  • Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the practitioner
  • Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the practitioner to demonstrate in a simulated environment
  • Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard
  • Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (eg: reports from a third party)
     

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 5 
    Erect log or wooden structures. 
    OUTCOME NOTES 
  • Erect wooden or log structures such as log and wood cabins; bridges and walkways.
  • Have knowledge of foundations; placing of pillars; modularising pallets and boarding. 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit Standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which practitioners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment; formative and summative assessment.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a practitioner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent. Similarly, if a practitioner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.


    Method of Assessment:

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-realistic, out-of-classroom simulation.


    Integrated assessment:

    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity.
  • Work out how practitioners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment. 
  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
  • Direct observation - watch the practitioner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions
  • Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the practitioner
  • Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the practitioner to demonstrate in a simulated environment
  • Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard
  • Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (eg: reports from a third party)
     

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 6 
    Maintain wildlife fencing. 
    OUTCOME NOTES 
  • Maintain standard line and mesh fences and combinations of these. Erect basic electric fences and electrify existing fences (limited to direct current systems NOT alternat current systems). 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit Standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which practitioners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment; formative and summative assessment.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a practitioner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent. Similarly, if a practitioner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.


    Method of Assessment:

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-realistic, out-of-classroom simulation.


    Integrated assessment:

    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity.
  • Work out how practitioners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment. 
  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
  • Direct observation - watch the practitioner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions
  • Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the practitioner
  • Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the practitioner to demonstrate in a simulated environment
  • Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard
  • Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (eg: reports from a third party)
     

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 7 
    Do basic welding and brazing 
    OUTCOME NOTES 
  • Weld mild steel; cast iron; copper and brass using arc and gas welding in horizontal and vertical positions. 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit Standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which practitioners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment; formative and summative assessment.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a practitioner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent. Similarly, if a practitioner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.


    Method of Assessment:

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-realistic, out-of-classroom simulation.


    Integrated assessment:

    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity.
  • Work out how practitioners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment. 
  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
  • Direct observation - watch the practitioner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions
  • Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the practitioner
  • Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the practitioner to demonstrate in a simulated environment
  • Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard
  • Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (eg: reports from a third party)
     

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 8 
    Maintain pumps, boreholes and static plants 
    OUTCOME NOTES 
  • Maintain pumps such as submersible; mono and reticulating pumps. Maintain the diesel; petrol and electrical engines / motors driving them. Change fuel and oil filters. Drain oil and bleed diesel engines. 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit Standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which practitioners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment; formative and summative assessment.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a practitioner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent. Similarly, if a practitioner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.


    Method of Assessment:

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-realistic, out-of-classroom simulation.


    Integrated assessment:

    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity.
  • Work out how practitioners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment. 
  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
  • Direct observation - watch the practitioner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions
  • Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the practitioner
  • Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the practitioner to demonstrate in a simulated environment
  • Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard
  • Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (eg: reports from a third party)
     


  • UNIT STANDARD ACCREDITATION AND MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against this unit standard must be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA.
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this unit standard must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA.
  • Assessment and moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA according to the ETQAs policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation; in terms of agreements reached around assessment and moderation between ETQAs (including professional bodies); and in terms of the moderation guideline detailed under point 4 immediately below.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments at exit points of the qualification, unless ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described both in individual unit standards as well as the integrated competence described in the qualification.

    Anyone wishing to be assessed against this qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution which is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

  • UNIT STANDARD ESSENTIAL EMBEDDED KNOWLEDGE 
    The qualifying learner is able to demonstrate a basic knowledge and understanding of :
  • Basic plumbing - clearing blockages, piping (water & sewerage), joints, geysers, solar panels,
  • Pump maintenance (mono, submersible, lister etc), head of water, etc.
  • Occupational Health and Safety.
  • Power tool maintenance & operation.
  • Borehole maintenance.
  • Concrete mixes.
  • Basic carpentry - joints, cuts, tools, sizing.
  • Basic painting - spraying, painting with various paints, preparation, finishes, surfaces (metal, wood, concrete, brick), coastal and inland corrosion \ wear & tear.
  • Basic gas stove & lights maintenance - Junkers, connections, refills,
  • Integrated Environmental Management on new construction, soils, water, aesthetics, access, etc.
  • Welding and brazing methods
  • Basic knowledge of soils for new construction
  • Energy saving devices.
  • Safe storage of gas and fuels
  • Basic bricklaying and paving
  • The various thicknesses of glass
  • The sizing, cutting and fitting of various glass 


  • Critical Cross-field Outcomes (CCFO): 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO IDENTIFYING 
  • Information evaluation
  • Inter-relatedness of systems 

  • UNIT STANDARD CCFO WORKING 
    Teamwork 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO ORGANISING 
    Self-organisation & management 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO COMMUNICATING 
  • Communication 

  • UNIT STANDARD CCFO SCIENCE 
  • Use of science and technology 

  • UNIT STANDARD CCFO DEMONSTRATING 
  • Problem Solving 

  • UNIT STANDARD NOTES 
    Values:

    Demonstration of the knowledge and skills outlined in this unit standard must be consistent with the principles of:
  • Maintaining essential ecological processes and life-support systems.
  • Maintaining genetic, species and ecosystem diversity.
  • Considering ecological and social rights and responsibilities, whilst ensuring sustainable utilisation of species and ecosystems.
  • Thereby yielding the greatest sustainable and equitable benefit to present generations whilst maintaining the potential to meet the needs and aspirations of future generations.

    Supplementary Information:

    Draw up an annual planner of work to be done within given budgets.
    Demonstrate working cleanliness & neatness for all maintenance. 

  • QUALIFICATIONS UTILISING THIS UNIT STANDARD: 
      ID QUALIFICATION TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL STATUS END DATE PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QA FUNCTIONARY
    Core  20153   National Certificate: Conservation: Fisheries Resource Management  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  Passed the End Date -
    Status was "Reregistered" 
    2012-06-30  CATHSSETA 
    Core  20416   National Certificate: Conservation: Natural Resource Management: Terrestrial  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  Passed the End Date -
    Status was "Reregistered" 
    2008-03-12  Was CATHSSETA until Last Date for Achievement 
    Core  59949   National Certificate: Natural Resource Management: Terrestrial  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  Reregistered  2023-06-30  CATHSSETA 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS UNIT STANDARD: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.