SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

Bachelor of Commerce 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
71778  Bachelor of Commerce 
ORIGINATOR
Regent Business School (Pty) Ltd t/a Regent Business School 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
CHE - Council on Higher Education  HEQSF - Higher Education Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National First Degree  Field 03 - Business, Commerce and Management Studies  Generic Management 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  360  Level 6  NQF Level 07  Regular-Provider-ELOAC 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2021-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2022-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

The primary purpose in establishing this programme is to provide learning opportunities for a very large group of successful matriculants who are unable to study on a full-time basis. The programme also caters for adults, who may or may not be in full time employment.

The secondary purpose is to provide a convenient and appropriate avenue into business management studies and eventual vocations for students who are seeking employment.

The third purpose is to provide a Qualification that would fulfil the admission requirements for the flagship MBA programmes offered by Regent Business School (RBS).

Rationale:

There is an increasing need to produce commerce graduates with a broader range of skills to further enhance capacity building and human resource development in management for the economic development in the Southern African Development Community.

The Bachelor of Commerce Degree will empower learners with skills and competencies necessary to function in both the private and public sector environments. This Qualification will also cater for the career and economic needs of learners who are in employment and prepare learners for further post-graduate study. 

LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
  • The learner is proficient in the language of instruction, presently English.
  • The learner is computer literate.
  • The learner is able to work independently.
  • The learner has obtained the general theoretical, practical and academic knowledge and understanding at NQF Level 4.

    Recognition of prior learning:

    Admission to this programme may be obtained through the recognition of prior learning. Candidates who do not qualify for admission in terms of the minimum admission criteria may be considered for admission through a process of RPL in keeping with the RBS RPL policy.

    Access to the qualification:

    Access to the Bachelor of Commerce Degree is:
  • A senior certificate with exemption or equivalent.
  • Possession of an appropriate certificate or diploma at NQF Level 5.
  • The programme will further accept candidates who provide evidence of formal/in-formal prior learning in this field of study. (Recognition of Prior Learning). 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    Learning Components; Number of credits allocated:
  • Compulsory Fundamental; 96 Credits at NQF Level 5.
  • Compulsory Core; 120 Credits at NQF Level 6.
  • Compulsory Electives: Fundamental; 24 Credits at NQF Level 5.
  • Compulsory Electives: Core; 120 Credits at NQF Level 6. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    Overall Exit Level Outcomes:

    A learner attaining the Bachelor of Commerce Degree will be able to:
  • Display the necessary knowledge and skills, attitudes and applied competence to enable them to demonstrate administrative proficiency.
  • Display knowledge of management in general.
  • Apply skills of rational judgement and planning.
  • Recognise and appreciate changes within organisations.
  • Make appropriate use of information technology.
  • Analyse and solve operational problems.
  • Display skills for the recording and processing of information.
  • Display ethical behaviour in a corporate management context.

    Specific Level Outcomes (for each Module):

    Accounting 101, 12 Credits, Fundamental, Compulsory:

    This module is designed to introduce the students to fundamental concepts and principles of accounting; the collecting of and processing of accounting data of an enterprise; the accounting treatment and disclosure of non-current assets and current assets, non-current liabilities and current liabilities, sole enterprises, non profit organizations and the recording of transactions from incomplete records.

    At the end of this module, the learner will be able to:
  • Describe and apply the basic concepts and principles of accounting.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of:
    > Collection and analysis of accounting data.
    > Accounting treatment of transactions.
    > Recording of transactions.

    Accounting 102, 12 Credits, Fundamental, Compulsory:

    This module familiarises the student with recording, classifying and interpreting financial data for a business. It includes a study of the journals, ledgers and financial statements used by these entities. It also covers credit instruments, depreciation of plant assets, internal control, liabilities, and partnerships, as well as a study of the journals, ledgers and financial statements used by service and merchandising businesses. At the end of this module a student will be able to classify and interpret financial data for a business.

    Accounting 201, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    This module covers a study of short-term assets, inventories, long-term assets, current liabilities, the partnership and corporate form of ownership, long-term liabilities, the statement of cash flows, financial statement analysis, and long-term investments. At the end of this module a student will be able to understand and work with the accounts of a variety of business entities.

    Accounting 202, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    This module covers a study of managerial accounting including cost allocations for activity-based costing and product costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, variable costing, budgeting, standard costing, operating and capital decision making analysis.

    At the end of this module a student should be able to demonstrate the ability to keep the accounts of a simple business entity, and to read and grasp the essence of the accounts of a variety of more complex business entities with sufficient accuracy to be able to take appropriate managerial decisions.

    Accounting 301, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    This module covers the preparation of financial statements based on the accounting framework; the requirements for the presentation of financial statements taking into account certain items which affect the income statement and the balance sheet: the accounting treatment and disclosure of income tax and secondary tax on companies; net profit or loss for the period and the accounting treatment and disclosure of fundamental errors and changes in accounting policy, events after balance sheet date, revenue recognition, provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent assets, share capital-transaction costs and the tax implication of the proceeding topics.

    Accounting 302, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    This module covers the recognition and measurement as well as the disclosure and presentation of financial instruments; the accounting treatment and disclosure of foreign exchange transactions property, plant and equipment (excluding the deferred tax implications of revaluations), investment properties, intangible assets, impairment of assets (excluding cash generating units and deferred tax implications), discontinuing operations and the tax implications of the preceding topics.

    Business Communication 102, 12 Credits, Fundamental, Compulsory:

    This module focuses on the presentation of concepts in a concise, complete manner in memos, letters and reports. Topics dealt with include composing, editing and revising reports and proposals, and other business-related communications including resumes and letters of application. The module also addresses reading skills, including the comprehension and evaluation of challenging materials.

    At the end of this module students will be expected to be able to read and clearly understand business communications in their fields, and to write clear and precise business communications in a variety of forms.

    Marketing 101, 15 Credits, Fundamental, Elective:

    The purpose of this module is to expose students to the subject terminology, marketing concepts, the role of marketing management; the nature of goods and services; derived customer demand, consumer marketing; product complexity; introduction to the concept of effective marketing strategy.

    Marketing 102, 15 Credits, Fundamental, Elective:

    The purpose of this module is to allow students to understand the task of the marketing manager; understand the market environment; and different sales techniques; the model of buyer behaviour; the buyer-seller relationships; customer service.

    Marketing 201, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the concepts of target marketing; product distribution; pricing and consumer behaviour strategies; market segmentation; strategic market segmentation; positioning; macro segmentation; micro segmentation; vertical market segmentation; segmentation in practice.

    Marketing 202, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    The purpose this module is make students aware of the development of management techniques; to identify problems and formulate solutions in the form of scientific marketing plans; the product life cycle; the competitive market structure; product portfolio analysis; new product strategy development; innovations including the role of R and D; and market pioneering.

    Marketing 301, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    The purpose of this module is to introduce students to market research; advertising and the different applications of the marketing and sales functions; pricing concepts; flexible and skimming versus penetration strategies; pricing methods; price leadership; push versus pull strategies; role of the distributor.

    Marketing 302, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    This module focuses on the application of theoretical knowledge to practice; the role of selling personnel; organization and management of the sales force; marketing communication and advertising; strategic planning for marketing; environment analysis; the importance of market share; and development of marketing programmes.

    Human Resource Management 101, 10 Credits, Fundamental, Elective:

    The purpose of this module is to introduce students to HR, the concept of the Organisation and the vital role of intellectual capital Advantage; Strategic Human Resource Management; Structuring the Organisation, the Flow of Work and Individual Jobs; Human Resource Planning, Recruitment and Selection; Employment Equity; Retaining Key Employees in South African and SADEC Organisations; Training; Performance Management; Employee Development and Understanding Careers in the Modern World; Compensation and Employee Benefits; Managing HIV/AIDS in the workplace.

    Human Resource Management 102, 15 Credits, Fundamental, Elective:

    In this module students will focus on the introduction to Organisational Behaviour - Understanding People and Organisations; Understanding Individual Behaviour in Organisations; Culture; Organisational Communication; Motivation; Stress Management; Group Dynamics and Teamwork; Power and Leadership in Organisations; Decision Making and Ethics; The Management of Change; Introduction to Organisational Behaviour-Understanding People and Organisations.

    Human Resource Management 201, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    The module will focus on the introduction to Labour Relations; The Historical Development of Labour Relations in South Africa; Participants in South Africa's Labour System; The South African Labour Market; The South African Labour Legislative Framework; Labour Relations at the Workplace: Discipline and Dismissal; Collective Bargaining and Organisational Rights; Negotiation; Dispute Resolution; Worker Participation; Industrial Action. SADEC students will be taken into account.

    Human Resource Management 202, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    The module will focus on the introduction to Training and Development; Strategic Training; The Needs Assessment; Theories and Approaches to Learning and Programme Design; Transfer of Training; Training Evaluation; Methods of Training; Employee Development; Careers and Career Management; training and Development in South Africa: Issues and Challenges.

    Human Resource Management 301, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    This module will focus on International HRM Issues-International Human Resource Management; Organisational Design, Compensation Management; Diversity Management (including employment equity), Performance Management- Aligning People with Strategy; Organisational Strategy: An Overview.

    Human Resource Management 302, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    The module will focus on the context of Human Resources in South Africa and the SADEC region; Human Resource Planning; Leadership and strategic directions-vision, mission and values; Linking Human Resource Practice to Strategy; Competitive Advantage through Human Resources; Incentive Pay, and Executive Compensation; Training and Development; Team Work for Effective Human Resource Strategy; Managing Change through Human Resources.

    Commercial Law 201, 12 Credits, Core, Compulsory:

    In this module students will be exposed to the law of obligations; introduction to the law of contract; the formation of a contract; principles and rules concerning valid and binding contracts; breach of contract, remedies on the ground of breach of contract; the transfer and termination of obligations; Specific contracts of lease; contract of purchase and sale; insurance contract; employment contract; Law of agency; forms of business enterprise, security, law of competition, franchising, alternative dispute resolution.

    Information Systems 202, 12 Credits, Core, Compulsory:

    The overriding purpose of this module is to give students the theoretical underpinning they need to link together their knowledge of business environments and the use of IT in business, but the student will also be expected to develop her or his practical computer skills. Topics will include the systems development life cycle (SDLC); security; backup; networks; an introduction to programming; further spreadsheets; the nature and use of data-management systems for administrators and end-users; principles of sound data management; word-processing; and the internet.

    At the end of the module the student will be able to discuss typical IT solutions for practical business, to outline the electronic tools which help managers to manage, and to describe the issues involved in operating a secure, legal IT environment. Students will be also able to use a word-processing package, and to plan, design, create and use spreadsheets and databases.

    Business Management 101, 12 Credits, Fundamental, Compulsory:

    This module introduces students to the field of study of business management, focusing on the management environment, the management process, and the evolution of management theory. At the conclusion of the module students should be able to understand some of the theoretical content of business management and discuss it critically in relation to certain simple selected situations that might arise in the context of managing a business.

    Business Management 102, 12 Credits, Fundamental, Compulsory:

    This module exposes students to an array of organisational structures and theories in relation to central and strategic management. It also involves students in the study of functional areas of management, including operations management, marketing management, human resource management and financial management.

    At the end of the module students should be able to understand and discuss organisations and organisational theory, and to propose solutions to a variety of more complex problems that might arise in the course of managing a business.

    Business Management 201, 15 Credits, Core, Compulsory:

    This module will develop students' insight into the nature of business management through consideration of the role of leadership in management, the role of groups and teams, and ways of motivating them. It will also briefly consider the importance of managerial communications and information technology.

    By the end of the module students should be able to evaluate and critically discuss various modes of management, and display an understanding of some of the factors essential to reaching sound managerial decisions.

    Business Management 202, 15 Credits, Core, Compulsory:

    This module expands a student's knowledge of business management by situating it in a global environment, by considering the development of management strategies especially in relation to change, and the management of information.

    At the conclusion of this module students should be able to demonstrate a detailed grasp of the nature of business administration in a variety of contexts, especially the global perspective, and to demonstrate the ability to evolve and describe management strategies relating to a variety of aspects of business management.

    Business Management 301, 15 Credits, Core, Compulsory:

    This module will focus students' attention on managing conflict and change in the context of managerial ethics and corporate social responsibility. It will also examine the related topic of industrial relations, with particular reference to the relevant legislative framework. At the conclusion of the module students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the need to address issues of change and conflict with honesty and sympathy, in the context of the relevant regulatory environment.

    Business Management 302, 15 Credits, Core, Compulsory:

    This module will deal with the notion of an organisational culture, and the elements that go to make up such a culture. It will in that context address the need for management of workforce diversity and the promotion and monitoring of quality in the organisation and its work. At the conclusion of the module students should be able to demonstrate that they have a firm grasp of the elements of organisational culture, and to analyse and make effective recommendations relating to hypothetical situations pertaining to issues in organisational culture.

    Entrepreneurship 301, 15 Credits, Core, Compulsory:

    This module will focus on the nature of entrepreneurship and issues relating to small business management in general. Various related topics will receive attention during the course of the study. These will include topics such as start-up, business plans, finance options, and franchises. At the conclusion of the module students should demonstrate that they are able on paper to set up and run a small business successfully.

    Economics 101, 12 Credits, Fundamental, Compulsory:

    This module is designed to give insight into how the basic economic problem is solved in different economic systems, how economic activity is measured and how prices are determined through decisions made by individual households and firms under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition.

    Economics 102, 12 Credits, Fundamental, Compulsory:

    Principles of Microeconomics:

    This module introduces core definitions, concepts and tools for understanding economics and economic decision-making at the micro level. Students will be able to understand the principles of the market mechanism, the market forces of demand and supply, their elasticities and interactions, and apply them to management and economic problems. Students will also be able to understand basic theories of consumer behaviour, production and costs, market structures, pricing and distribution, including collection bargaining and wage determination across different labour market structures, and apply these to the analysis of managerial situations and decision-making.

    Economics 201, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    Principles of Macroeconomics:

    This module introduces and develops the concepts of demand, supply, output, income, expenditure and price levels, and requires the student to understand these concepts fully. Students are required to understand the processes and outcomes of macro policy making in South Africa, and their impact on the individual firm. To this end students are required to grasp the circular flow of economic activity in open and closed economies in the context of classical Keynesian and neo-Keynesian theories. Students are required to engage in the debate of growth vs. development, and to demonstrate that they can collect elementary secondary/economic data using conventional measures of macroeconomic trends. Students are also required to demonstrate that they can relate macro to microeconomic factors in reaching management decisions for private firms.

    Economics 202, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    Monetary and Public Economics:

    Students are introduced to the concepts of money, money supply, and measures of money. They grasp basic theories of money and the meaning, significance and role of monetary policy, in which context they understand the role of central and commercial banks. Students are thus able to analyse the South African banking structure, and its role and impact on organisations. Students are also made aware of the process, role and impact of monetary policy formulation in South Africa, and are given a brief overview of monetary policies in other countries, of the World Bank, and of the IMF.

    In the section devoted to Public Economics students understand the meaning and role of fiscal policy and its role in the modern economy. They are required to be able to describe the workings of the fiscal tools such as taxation, expenditure, and borrowing. They are required to be able to analyse the role and impact of fiscal policy in South Africa. Students are also made aware of the processes of lobbying and budget formulation. As a result they should be able to analyse recent national, provincial and local budgets and understand their economic impact on a manager's decision making at the organisational level.

    Economics 301, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    International Economics:

    This module explains classical and modern international trade theories so that a student understands the basis of trade and why trade is inevitable. Students are made to understand the problem of comparative cost differences and purchasing power parity, and their relevance in the modern economy.

    The workings of foreign exchange rates, their determination and fluctuation, and related concepts such as arbitrage, hedging and speculation, are explored with the help of everyday examples. Students are led to an understanding of the implications of foreign trade for the domestic economy through considering the role of imports and exports, their impact on domestic prices, arguments for free or protected trade, and the statement of the balance of payments. Students are expected to be able to analyse different statements of the balance of payments and to understand their impact on the organisation and the work environment.

    Economics 302, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    Southern Africa in the Global Economy:

    In this module students become familiar with the local, national, regional and global environment in which the manager and the organisation operate. They are given a statistical description of the Southern African economy in terms of various economic indicators, and are expected to be able to analyse a range of economic issues and problems from a historical, current and futuristic perspective. Students are also required to demonstrate that they have a sufficient grasp of the global economy to be able to analyse its impact on the local economy.

    International Business 302, 15 Credits, Core, Compulsory:

    The purpose of the module is to give students an insight into managerial implications involved in international business by making important theories accessible and interesting to students; explain how and why the world's countries differ; present a thorough review of the economics and politics of international trade and investment; explain the functions and form of the global monetary system; examine the strategies and structures of internal businesses; assess the special roles of an international business's various functions.

    Health Management 101, 12 Credits, Fundamental, Elective:

    Health Care Systems and the Regulatory Environment in the SADEC Region:

    This module introduces the role of health service managers as members of the health care team, the basic principles of health service management in health care facilities and beyond, and the functions of health care managers. Topics to be introduced include the regulatory environment, the varieties of systems available (such as primary health care, or African traditional medicine and other complementary therapies), sources of funding, and the health insurance industry.
    At the end of this module students will be able to demonstrate that they have a grasp of the role of a health service manager in a number of contexts.

    Health Management 102, 12 Credits, Fundamental, Elective:

    Health Education and Promotion:

    This module provides an inclusive overview of issues in health education and promotion, including programme management and evaluation, in the context of an overview of the cultural mores of the communities who live in the SADEC region.

    At the end of this module students will be able to demonstrate that they understand the factors that impinge on health education and promotion in the SADEC region, and will be able to design a hypothetical health education and promotion programme relating to a regional situation.

    Health Management 201, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    Health Information Management/Health Computer Systems:

    Prerequisite: A certificate of basic competence from a provider of computer skills training.

    This module deals with the principles and applications of electronic data processing in healthcare settings. Computerised health information systems are analysed from a variety of viewpoints including the objectives of the system, the technology which makes it operative, and the various ways information is transferred and used in health facilities. Topics to be introduced may include the application of computer use in health, clinical, and business information systems, in patient care, in management, and in public health. At the end of this module students will be able to demonstrate that they have a grasp of the technology in use in health systems management and the appropriate uses of this technology.

    Health Management 202, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    Community Analysis and Health Care Planning:

    This module is designed to facilitate insight into issues bearing on health care planning. The focus will be on identifying problems through the effective assessment of the health needs of the communities to be served and of the constraints imposed by the context in which the service is to be provided, including the availability or lack of availability of resources. Students will plan appropriate responses to the situations analysed. Factors to be considered will include the political, economic and cultural aspects of the situation, the actions of lobbying groups, and existing relevant policy.

    At the end of this module students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the contexts and constraints impinging on the planning of healthcare delivery, and will be able to plan appropriate responses to hypothetical situations.

    Health Management 301, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    Epidemiology:

    This module examines ways in which the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in populations is helpful in controlling or preventing the occurrence of disease. The module begins with the history of disease in human populations and examines how scientific concepts and methods changed our ability to predict and ultimately to control many diseases. Students are introduced to a range of study designs and measurement methods in areas such as clinical, environmental, genetic and behavioural epidemiology, and are required to consider ways in which this science can be applied to solving problems in practical settings.

    At the end of this module students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relation between epidemiology and healthcare policy and planning, and to demonstrate this relationship in action in a historical or hypothetical situation.

    Health Management 302, 15 Credits, Core, Elective:

    Quality Monitoring in Health Care Management:

    This module is designed to introduce students to a variety of aspects of quality management within the healthcare arena. Students will study legislated and voluntary processes and benchmarks, and various methods of assessing and improving the quality of healthcare provision. Students will learn how to carry out performance monitoring, focusing on evaluation of patient care, and physician and provider performance.

    At the end of this module students should be able to demonstrate that they have a good understanding of the methods of quality assurance and promotion in a healthcare setting, and should be able to propose appropriate methods of dealing with a hypothetical situation in such a setting.

    Statistics 102, 12 Credits, Fundamental, Compulsory:

    Introduction to Probability and Statistics:

    The aim of this module is to provide a basic understanding of the quantitative methods used in business. Topics to be dealt with will include population samples, the presentation of data, probability, random variables and their distribution, the point and interval hypothesis, significance tests, regression, and correlation.

    At the conclusion of this module a student will be able to:
  • Appreciate sources of data and survey methods.
  • Summarise data both graphically and by summary statistics.
  • Use appropriate statistics with bivariate data.
  • Understand basic forecasting techniques.
  • Appreciate the use of index numbers.
  • Use appropriate statistical spreadsheet facilities. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcomes:

    The assessment of students' responses to questions in the assignments and examinations provide the assessors with an indication as to whether students are able to:
  • Apply communicative and numerical skills as lifelong learners and researchers.
  • Competently plan, design and reflect on the areas of business management.
  • Read academic and professional texts critically.
  • Apply the skills of rational argument, judgement, planning, and decision-making analysis to complex business management problems.
  • Recognise and respond effectively to social, economic, technological and political change within organisations in their national and international settings.
  • To produce and present clear business plans and reports.
  • And to critically evaluate the business plans and reports.
  • Analyze, interpret and make decisions from data contained in the financial statements of companies.

    Assignments and examinations will be weighted in the ratio of 40% and 60% respectively in each module.

    Integrated assessment:

    Students will be assessed on one assignment and one examination per module. Thus, the final mark will be made up of 40 % for the assignment and 60 % for the examination. A sub-minimum of 40 % is required in the written examination. Examinations will be of two hour duration.

    The assessment of students' responses to questions in the assignments and examinations provide the assessors with an indication as to whether students are able to:
  • Apply communicative and numerical skills as lifelong learners and researchers.
  • Competently plan, design and reflect on the areas of business management.
  • Read academic and professional texts critically.
  • Apply the skills of rational argument, judgement, planning, and decision-making analysis to complex business management problems.
  • Recognise and respond effectively to social, economic, technological and political change within organisations in their national and international settings.
  • Produce and present clear business plans and reports.
  • Evaluate the business plans and reports.
  • Analyze, interpret and make decisions from data contained in the financial statements of companies. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    The programme was designed in accordance with the principles enunciated in Chapters Three and Four of the Department of Education publication A Qualification Structure for Universities in South Africa, Report 116, Department of Education (96/02). The programme was benchmarked against the only other BCom offered by distance education in the country, that of UNISA, and against those of a number of international institutions whose curricula and syllabi are available on the internet. The RBS is convinced that the programme is as good as all those with which it was compared. The programme was also designed to link the RBS BCom programmes with the RBS MBA programme, which gives it added purpose and distinctiveness. The international institutions of which the curricula were taken most closely into account were:
  • Anderson College.
  • The University of Luton (United Kingdom).
  • The University of Canberra (Asian Institute of Management).
  • The University of South Australia.
  • The University of Texas of the Permian Basin. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
  • The RBS Bachelor of Commerce Degree builds on Degree and Diploma programmes offered by all higher education institutions. It articulates vertically into an Honours programme or a Master of Business Administration programme. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
    All examination question papers for Exit Level modules are externally moderated.

    The minimum number of examination scripts sent for moderation is 20 or 20% of the total. The Examinations Board approves both the appointment of moderators and final assessment marks. 

    CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    To qualify as an assessor an individual must:
  • Generally have a Higher Education Qualification at least one level higher than the course being assessed.
  • Be in the possession of qualifications that are relevant to the programme.

    The following criteria are used for appointing external moderators:
  • Their experience of examining similar programme.
  • Their independence from RBS and from the programmes team.
  • Their expertise in the subject area.
  • Have a Qualification at least one level higher than the programme being assessed. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    Rules governing the award of the qualification:

    An award of the Regent Business School (RBS) will be conferred when the following conditions are satisfied:
  • The candidate was bona-fide registered student of RBS for Bachelor of Commerce Degree.
  • Details of the candidate's full name, date of birth, gender, programme and award have been registered by RBS.
  • It has been confirmed that the candidate has completed the Bachelor of Commerce Degree of study.
  • The award is approved by the Examinations Board. 

  • LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. Regent Business School (Pty) Ltd t/a Regent Business School 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.