SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

National Diploma: Trade Union Practice 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
63369  National Diploma: Trade Union Practice 
ORIGINATOR
Task Team - Trade Unions 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
ETDP SETA - Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Diploma  Field 05 - Education, Training and Development  Adult Learning 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  260  Level 5  NQF Level 05  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2023-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2024-06-30   2028-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

This Qualification is for any individual who is, or wishes to be, involved in a trade union environment and be able to perform a range of activities to support the processes and activities within a trade union. Typical learners will be persons who are currently working in a trade union environment who have not received any formal recognition for their skills and knowledge, or learners with a broad knowledge and skills base who work within the trade union structures and who want to specialise in certain aspects of the trade union environment. While the Qualification is primarily aimed at the local/branch/regional organiser in the trade union movement, it does not preclude any other individual both within and outside the trade union movement from accessing it.

While this Qualification contains all the competencies required by a learner at NQF Level 5, it also contains critical competencies and skills from the FETC: Trade Union Practice so as not to disadvantage any learner who might not have had access to or completed that Qualification.

The Core component contains generic competencies covering:
  • Collective and individual representation as it pertains to workers in the trade union movement.
  • Strategies to recruit, unionise and service workers in the workplace.
  • Knowledge of the sociology of work as it relates to trade union organisation in South Africa.
  • Planning and administering projects and campaigns within a trade union context.
  • Interpreting and applying knowledge and understanding of financial information.
  • Developing leadership skills in a trade union context.
  • Knowledge of labour law to advance the interests and defend the rights of workers and the working class.
  • Knowledge of the South African and global political economies as it pertains to the trade union movement.
  • Health, safety and environmental issues and their implications for workers and society.
  • Knowledge of theories and history of working class organisations.

    The Elective component consists of specialisation streams. Initially only two streams have been included in the Qualification namely gender empowerment and administration but other streams including conflict resolution, negotiation, education, research, media and communication may also be added. Each of these streams constitutes a set of appropriate unit standards that allow the learner to obtain competencies in particular areas within the trade union sector.

    The Qualification ensures progression of learning, enabling the learner to meet standards of service excellence required within the trade union field of learning and provide access to a higher Qualification within the same or a related sector.

    The Qualification also focuses on the skills, knowledge, values and attitudes required by a learner at this level and is designed to:
  • To release the potential of people.
  • To provide opportunities for people to improve their career opportunities.
  • To provide opportunities for people to explore different activities within the trade union sector.

    Rationale:

    This National Diploma: Trade Union Practice at NQF Level 5 is the second in a series of Qualifications for anyone wishing to pursue a career in a trade union environment. The Qualification reflects the competencies required to participate effectively as a branch or regional coordinator or operate in a number of different contexts (education, research, communication, media) within the trade union environment.

    In terms of the learning pathway, the National Diploma: Trade Union Practice at NQF Level 5 will allow a learner to progress to the proposed national qualification at NQF Level 6 at which point the learner would operate at the level of a national organiser, policy coordinator for research, gender coordinator, treasurer, education coordinator.

    The trade union movement in South Africa is in need of highly qualified individuals who can contribute to meeting its many local and international challenges, develop the requisite skills to efficiently manage trade union activity at its diverse levels and to strengthen the trade union movement. This sector employs a large number of people, most of whom do not enjoy any formal recognition for the skills that they deploy in performing their tasks.

    In terms of transformation in the country, learners will require skills and competencies to gain access to positions within management structures by completing other Qualifications and training. It will be in the interest of the country and the sector to ensure that those who operate in the trade union movement are trained according to this Qualification.

    This national Qualification and its related Unit Standards were developed to standardise the accreditation of learning programmes, resulting in improved quality management in terms of programme delivery.

    The National Diploma: Trade Union Practice at NQF Level 5 supports the objectives of the NQF in that it gives the learner access to a registered Qualification. It will ensure that the quality of education and training in the sub-field is enhanced and of a world-class standard. The Qualification will allow learners to benchmark their competencies against international standards. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
  • It is assumed that learners are competent in Communication and Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 4 or equivalent.
  • It is recommended that learners have acquired the FETC: Trade Union Practice NQF Level 4 or any other relevant FETC Qualification.

    Recognition of Prior Learning:

    This Qualification may be achieved in part (or whole) through the recognition of relevant prior knowledge and/or experience. The learner must be able to demonstrate competence in the skills, knowledge, values and attitudes implicit in this Qualification. As part of the provision of recognition of prior learning providers are required to develop a structured means for the assessment of individual learners against the Unit Standards of the Qualification on a case-by-case basis. A range of assessment tools and techniques during formative and summative assessment procedures should be used which have been jointly decided upon by the learner and the assessor. Such procedures, and the assessment of individual cases, are subject to moderation by independent assessors. The same principles that apply to assessment of this Qualification also apply to recognition of prior learning.

    Learners may provide evidence of prior learning for which they may receive credit towards the Unit Standards and/or the Qualification by means of portfolios or other forms of appropriate evidence as agreed to between the relevant provider and relevant ETQA or ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding in place with the relevant ETQA.

    RPL is particularly important, as there are people in the sector or trade union movement with a variety of skills and competencies of differing quality and scope. It is important that an RPL process be available to assist in making sense of existing competencies and skills, and helping to standardise these competencies and skills towards a common standard.

    Access to the Qualification:

    There is an open access to this Qualification, keeping in mind the "Learning Assumed to be in Place". 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    A minimum of 260 credits is required to complete the Qualification which is made up of the following components:
  • Fundamental: 25 credits.
  • Core: 215 credits.
  • Electives: 20 credits.
  • Total: 260 credits.

    Motivation for the number of credits assigned to the Fundamental, Core and Elective Components:

    Fundamental Component:

    There are 25 credits allocated to this component at the level of the Qualification. All the Unit Standards designated as Fundamental are compulsory.

    Core Component:

    215 credits have been allocated to Unit Standards designated as Core for the purpose of this Qualification. These Unit Standards provide the generic knowledge and skills related to trade union practice in general, issues that have been highlighted in the Purpose Statement.

    All the Unit Standards indicated as Core are compulsory.

    Elective Component:

    Electives that add up to a minimum of 20 credits must be completed. The Elective component consists of specialisation streams. Initially only three streams have been included in the Qualification, namely gender and administration. Other streams, listed below, will be developed in the future. Each of the current streams constitutes a set of appropriate unit standards that allow the learner to obtain competencies in particular areas within the trade union sector.

    These Elective streams provide opportunities for the holistic development of the learner and allow for maximum flexibility and multi-skilling to enable the learners to achieve a Qualification that is relevant to the context in which they work. Learners who complete a specialisation may complete Unit Standard Standards from other streams (as they become available) if they relate directly to the learner's context or focus area of practice.

    The identified streams are:
  • Administration.
  • Gender.
  • Leadership.
  • Media.
  • Communication.
  • Education.
  • Research.
  • Conflict Resolution.
  • Negotiation.

    Learners must choose 20 credits from the streams of specialisations below. Where the credits of the Unit Standards in the specialisation do not add up to 36 credits, the learner may choose any other Unit Standard/s from the Elective component to complete a minimum of 36 credits.

    Cluster of Unit Standards recommended for specialisation in Administration:
  • Unit Standard ID 10003: Develop administrative procedures in a selected organisation, Level 4, 8 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 120301: Formulate and evaluate public sector policies and regulations, Level 5, 8 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 110000: Generate information and reports for internal and external use, Level 4, 10 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 120306: Manage service delivery improvement, Level 6, 8 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 110009: Manage administration records, Level 4, 4 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 252030: Analyse compliance to legal requirements and recommend corrective actions, Level 5, 4 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 243267: Apply and continuously improve company policies and procedures, Level 5, 10 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 15234: Apply efficient time management to the work of a department/division/section, Level 5, 4 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 252044: Apply the principles of knowledge management, Level 5, 6 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 15231: Create and use a range of resources to effectively manage teams, sections, departments or divisions, Level 5, 4 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 115855: Create, maintain and update record keeping systems, Level 5, 5 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 116924: Implement a programme of diversity management in the workplace, Level 5, 14 credits.

    Cluster of Unit Standards recommended for specialisation in Gender:
  • Unit Standard ID 244254: Manage the mainstreaming of gender in programmes and projects, Level 6, 10 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 254417: Assess, monitor and evaluate organisational compliance with policies on gender equality and women's empowerment, Level 6, 10 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 254418: Design and develop policy in respect of gender equality and women's empowerment, Level 5, 10 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 254458: Design and implement a communication strategy that supports gender equality and women's empowerment, Level 6, 8 credits.

    Cluster of Unit Standards recommended for specialisation in Leadership:
  • Unit Standard ID 120304: Analyse, interpret and communicate information, Level 5, 9 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 252026: Apply a systems approach to decision making, Level 5, 6 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 252031: Apply the principles and concepts of emotional intelligence to the management of self and others, Level 5, 4 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 15219: Develop and implement a strategy and action plans for a team, department or division, Level 5, 4 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 116926: Implement skills development as workplace learning to support organisational transformation, Level 5, 12 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 120392: Apply the principles of knowledge management to leadership, Level 4, 8 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 120311: Apply visionary leadership to develop strategy, Level 5, 10 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 120390: Develop and apply a service culture to a leadership role, Level 4, 8 credits.
  • Unit Standard ID 252027: Devise and apply strategies to establish and maintain workplace relationships, Level 5, 6 credits. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    Qualifying learners will be able to:

    1. Apply knowledge and understanding of collective and individual representation as it pertains to workers in the trade union movement.

    2. Explore and apply strategies to recruit, unionise and service workers in the workplace within the local economic context.

    3. Explore the sociology of work as it relates to trade union organisation in South Africa.

    4. Plan and administer projects and campaigns within a trade union context.

    5. Interpret and apply knowledge and understanding of financial information procedures.

    6. Demonstrate knowledge and application of leadership theory and skills in a trade union context.

    7. Demonstrate and apply knowledge of labour law to advance the interests and defend the rights of workers and the working class.

    8. Analyse and apply knowledge of South African political economy as it pertains to the trade union movement.

    9. Evaluate health, safety and environmental issues and their implications for workers and society.

    10. Analyse theories and history of working class organisations. 

    ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:

    1.1 Collective bargaining, strikes and labour disputes and mediation are discussed in terms of current legislation.
    1.2 Challenges related to collective bargaining are discussed and solutions are presented to suit a collective bargaining context.
    1.3 The steps to resolve a grievance at the workplace level are understood and explained in order to prevent the matter from being declared a dispute.
    1.4 The types of dispute are identified and distinguished in terms of their complexity and the matter referred to the appropriate commission and institution.
    > Range: Dispute includes interests (economic) disputes and rights disputes.
    1.5 A strategy and an implementation plan are developed to manage and control a strike by workers.
    1.6 The consequences of non-adherence to strike procedures are explained to ensure legality of the strike.
    1.7 The types of procedures and rules to represent workers in a variety of contexts are described and understood in order to ensure that proper representation takes place.
    > Range: Contexts include but are not limited to bargaining councils, company structures, CCMA, labour courts.
    1.8 Mediation, conciliation and arbitration processes and techniques are understood and applied to enhance representation of worker's interests.
    1.9 Cases are analysed and the process of managing them from the workplace to the Labour courts is described in order to reach resolution.
    1.10 Workers are prepared for hearings at different levels so that they understand the dynamics and requirements of the process.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:

    2.1 Workers are recruited and mobilised according to trade union procedures and through mobilisation campaigns.
    2.2 Membership structures are established and maintained to promote worker interests.
    2.3 The importance of establishing and maintaining gender equality in the trade union movement is discussed in terms of constitutional imperatives and the transformational agenda of the country.
    2.4 Worker education is conducted to ensure transparency and worker participation in trade union processes.
    2.5 Information on the workplace is collected, interpreted, and communicated to advance worker's interest and for research purposes.
    2.6 Local and global solidarity networks are established to strengthen workers' rights and power and ensure mutual benefits.
    2.7 Communication and facilitation skills are implemented in promoting worker education and solidarity.
    2.8 National and international trade union concerns and challenges are addressed to improve workers' conditions.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:

    3.1 The concept of the labour market is understood and analysed in terms of how labour can respond to the economic challenges.
    3.2 The concept of precarious work in a capitalist society is explained using examples, to demonstrate impact on workers.
    3.3 The changing nature of work, production processes and the impact of technology is analysed to develop strategies and policies to limit impact on workers.
    3.4 Race, class and gender within the context of the workplace are explored to generate ways to address the levels of inequalities.
    3.5 Power relations and power dynamics between trade union movements and capitalist formations are explained to develop tactics and strategies to achieve worker control and success.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:

    4.1 Research is conducted to assess the viability of a project and/or campaign.
    4.2 Skills to plan, implement and manage projects/campaigns are applied to ensure success of the project and/or campaign.
    4.3 Knowledge of budgets and logistics is applied to ensure the financial viability and organisation of the projects/campaigns.
    4.4 A funding proposal is developed to ensure that financial resources are available and managed for the implementation and completion of the project.
    > Range: Funding proposal to include objectives, activities, timelines, human resources, risk factors and detailed costing.
    4.5 Communication strategies and skills are used to ensure the success of the projects and/or campaigns through liaising with all stakeholders.
    4.6 Projects and/or campaigns are monitored and evaluated to gauge their effectiveness in terms of the objectives and budget and interventions are made, where necessary.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 5:

    5.1 Financial statements of a company are interpreted when assessing its financial situation in order to protect workers' interests and to participate in the restructuring of a company.
    5.2 Corporate governance principles and ethics are applied to ensure fiduciary responsibility.
    5.3 Internal trade union financial procedures are applied to ensure compliance with current legislation and trade union policy.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 6:

    6.1 Different leadership models are analysed and compared to determine the appropriate model for a trade union context.
    6.2 Collective leadership principles are applied to ensure worker confidence, cooperation and equality.
    6.3 The decision making process is facilitated through consultation in line with the mandate.
    6.4 The process of obtaining mandates from workers to make decisions is described and applied in a context.
    6.5 The concept and principles of worker control are defined and explained to clarify power relations within the trade union.
    6.6 Areas of responsibility are demarcated and accountability procedures are agreed upon in terms of the constitution of the trade union.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 7:

    7.1 Relevant aspects of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa are understood and applied in order to promote workers' rights.
    7.2 Legislation pertaining to labour law is interpreted and applied to protect workers in the workplace.
    > Range: Legislation includes Range: Labour Relations Act (LRA), Basic Conditions of Employment Act (BCEA), Skills Development Act (SDA), Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA), Employment Equity Act (EEA), Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act (COIDA).
    7.3 The strengths and weaknesses of legislation are analysed in order to determine challenges and opportunities to advance the interest of workers.
    7.4 Activities and campaigns to advance workers' rights are performed within a human rights framework.
    7.5 The role and powers of commissions and institutions relevant to labour law are described and the inter-relationships between them explored.
    > Range: Commissions include Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA), bargaining councils.
    7.6 Institutions include but are not limited to the National Economic Development and Labour Advisory Council (NEDLAC), labour courts and those established through the recognition agreement, etc.
    7.7 The roles and functions of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) are understood and explained to benchmark local labour demands against international standards.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 8:

    8.1 The origins and differences in economic theories are explained to show their interpretation of and impact on human society.
    8.2 The labour theory of value is explained as a tool of analysis.
    8.3 The Links between economics and social structures (social analysis) are explored to indicate how the hegemony and power of the dominant class is asserted and maintained.
    8.4 The various economic systems are described and assessed to indicate the advantages and disadvantages for the working class.
    8.5 The ideology of Neo-liberal capitalism is analysed to show its effects on development in South Africa and the Southern African region.
    8.6 The structure of the South African economy is described to determine the shift in policy from the pre- to post-1994 periods.
    8.7 The role of the trade union movement within the political economy of SA is explored to show how the movement has responded to the economic imperatives of the country.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 9:

    9.1 Workplace hazards are analysed to determine measures for prevention, control, elimination or avoidance to work.
    9.2 The rights of workers to refuse to work in unsafe conditions are analysed with examples of how their health and safety is compromised and in line with relevant legislation.
    9.3 Workplace Safety, Health and Environment (SHE) aspects are analysed to determine their impact on the workers and the community.
    9.4 The company's SHE policies and practices are analysed to check compliance with national and international standards.
    9.5 A company's compliance is monitored in line with occupational health and safety legislation, international and industry conventions and codes of practice.
    9.6 HIV/AIDS and dread diseases are explained to highlight the dangers these pose to workers' health and wellbeing.
    > Range: Diseases include cancer, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), heart disease including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes and Tuberculosis (TB).

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 10:

    10.1 The history of solidarity of the working class locally and internationally is explored to understand the inter-relationships between them and the role of this in advancing working class struggles.
    10.2 The way in which the history of the trade unions has been informed by the history of production is analysed in terms of the importance of organising workers and building worker unity.
    10.3 The role of working class movement in the struggle against colonisation is analysed to show how the working class movement challenged the power relations during various historical periods.
    10.4 Different ideological orientations are analysed to show how they influenced the development of the trade unions movement in South Africa.
    10.5 Trade union history is analysed to show the role and impact of gender dynamics on women.
    10.6 The concept of social movement unionism is explained to show the parallels between union and working class issues.

    Integrated Assessment:

    The importance of integrated assessment is to confirm that the learner is able to demonstrate applied competence (practical, foundational and reflexive) and ensure that the purpose of this Qualification is achieved. Both formative and summative assessment methods and strategies are used to ensure that the Exit Level Outcomes and the purpose of the Qualification are achieved through achieving the Unit Standards. Learning, teaching and assessment are inextricably linked.

    Learning and assessment should be integrated and assessment practices must be fair, transparent, valid and reliable. A variety of assessment strategies and approaches must be used. This could include tests, assignments, projects, demonstrations and/or any applicable method. Evidence of the acquisition of competencies must be demonstrated through the Unit Standards, which enhance the integration of theory and practice as deemed appropriate at this level.

    Formative assessment is an on-going process which is used to assess the efficacy of the teaching and learning process. It is used to plan appropriate learning experiences to meet the learner's needs. Formative assessments can include a mix of simulated and actual (real) practice or authentic settings. Feedback from assessment informs both teaching and learning. If the learner has met the assessment criteria of all the Unit Standards then s/he has achieved the Exit Level Outcomes of the Qualification.

    Summative assessment is concerned with the judgement of the learning in relation to the Exit Level Outcomes of the Qualification. Such judgement must include integrated assessment(s) which test the learners' ability to integrate the larger body of knowledge, skills and attitudes, which are represented by the Exit Level Outcomes. Summative assessment can take the form of oral, written and practical examinations as agreed to by the relevant ETQA.

    Integrated assessment must be designed to achieve the following:
  • An integration of the achievement of the Exit Level Outcomes in a way that reflects a comprehensive approach to learning and shows that the purpose of the Qualification has been achieved.
  • Judgement of learner performance to provide evidence of applied competence or capability.

    Assessors and moderators should make use of a range of formative and summative assessment methods. Assessors should assess and give credit for the evidence of learning that has already been acquired through formal, informal and non-formal learning and work experience.

    Assessment should ensure that all specific outcomes, embedded knowledge and Critical Cross-Field Outcomes are assessed. The assessment of the Critical Cross-Field Outcomes should be integrated with the assessment of specific outcomes and embedded knowledge. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    The National Diploma: Trade Union Practice at NQF Level 5 primarily addresses the competencies required of a branch or regional organiser within the trade union movement. These competencies are captured manly in the Core component of the Qualification.

    These are:
  • Arbitration.
  • Collective Bargaining.
  • Gender.
  • Political Economy.
  • Protest action.
  • Sociology of Work.
  • Legislation.
  • Negotiation.
  • Leadership.
  • Human rights.
  • Occupational Health and Safety.
  • Communication.

    This international comparability exercise has revealed that almost every country has trade unions and/or federations that conduct some kind of trade union education. The extent to which training in this context takes place depends on a variety of factors: history of the country, trade union tradition, size of the unionised population and so on.

    Various countries were looked at; some with a strong trade union culture and others quite the opposite. Europe, the Americas, some African and Asian countries have strong trade union movements. African trade union movements are becoming stronger and more organised in terms of their training capacity.

    Very few countries offer this sort of Qualification with these competencies at the relevant NQF Level. However, most countries offer seminars, workshops, short courses for trade unionists, which cover the competencies outlined above.

    England:

    The East Riding College offers a Union Reps Course which consists of two stages. For purposes of comparing this qualification the focus will be on Stage 2 which is attempted after one has undergone training to a shop steward.

    This consists of the following aspects:
  • Collective bargaining aims and techniques.
  • Find and using information.
  • Analysing documents and surveys.
  • Improving union organisation.
  • Developing skills for union work.
  • Applying employment law.
  • Addressing industrial relations issues.
  • Public speaking.

    The college also offers the Safety Reps Course. Again Stage 2 of this course has resonance with this qualification although its focus is on health and safety.

    Stage 2 runs for twelve weeks and covers the following:
  • Communicating with members.
  • Negotiating improvements in health and safety.
  • Analysis of workplace hazards experience by course members.
  • Proposed solutions to such workplace problems.
  • Updating knowledge of new regulations and standards.

    However, of greater relevance to this qualification is the TUC Certificate in Contemporary Trade Unionism which is a 210 hour course over 3 terms.

    This course will develop the learner's understanding of industrial society and the role of trade unions past and present and includes modules on:
  • Development of trade unionism in Britain.
  • Trade unions today.
  • Future of trade unions.
  • Research, communication, problem solving.
  • Project writing.

    Of limited relevance but still important for comparability purposes is the TUC Certificate in Employment Law which is a 30 week course over 3 terms.

    This course will develop understanding of current Employment Law and includes modules on:
  • Employment relations.
  • Sex, race, disability discrimination.
  • Work-life balance/protecting workers.
  • Representation and union recognition.
  • Research, communication, problem solving.
  • Project writing.

    The TUC Certificate in Occupational Health and Safety which is a 30 week course over 3 terms is also relevant.

    This course will develop your understanding of health and safety principle and practice and includes modules on:
  • Health and safety organisation.
  • Health and safety law.
  • Health, safety, welfare in the environment.
  • Research, communication, problem solving.

    The London Metropolitan University offers a Certificate in Professional Development. The course aims to enable participants to critically reflect upon and develop their practice as Trade Union Learning Representatives (ULRs) in the context of Trade Union and industrial strategies and in the wider Lifelong Learning and Skills agenda. The Certificate in Professional Development offers a unique pathway into higher education as the modules map onto the BA in Labour and Trade Union studies. The course has been developed in collaboration with trade unions.

    Core modules:
  • Ways of Learning.
  • The Learning Agenda: Organising, Communicating and Bargaining.
  • The Struggle for Workers' Education.
  • Trade Unions, Industrial Globalisation, Change at Work and the Role of Union Learning.
  • Trade Union Activity and Governance.
  • An Introduction to Trade Unions, Work and the Environment.
  • Equalities, Trade Unions and Work.
    The institution also offers a BA (Hons) many of whose aspects are covered in this diploma. Only those aspects that are relevant have been listed below.

    Level 1 modules include:
  • Health and Work.
  • Law and Employment Rights.
  • Context of Workplace Bargaining.
  • Industrial Relations and Collective Bargaining.

    Level 2 modules include:
  • Trade Unions and the Environment.
  • Early Trade Union Formations 1780-1867.
  • Technology and Change at Work.
  • Political Economy II.

    Level 3 modules include:
  • Global Political Economy.
  • Women in the Labour Movement II.
  • Race, Anti-racism and the Black Presence.
  • Coming of Age 1867-1939.

    Southampton City College offers a TUC Stepping Up - Union Reps course over 10 days during which they cover the following aspects relevant to this qualification.

    The course has 5 modules.

    1. The Trade Union Context: This module will help you to build a broad perspective of where you fit in the scheme of things and explore union priorities, structures and support and build understanding of the employment context.
    2. Planning, Organising, Campaigning: This module provides a focus for you to consider your union's central purposes and the importance of these being reflected in your everyday actions.
    3. Rights at Work: This module aims to do more than provide an introduction to the law at work.
    4. Collective Bargaining: Collective bargaining is one of the key functions of the union rep.
    5. Leading on the Collective Agenda: As a rep you will have been elected as part of a democratic structure and process and are expected to provide a lead on behalf of members.

    Union Learn is an organisation that provides trade union training across England, Scotland and Wales.

    Some of the courses relevant to this qualification are:
  • Handling Casework.
  • Employment Law.
  • Communications and Campaigning.
  • Equality.
  • Employment Law update.
  • Communications and Campaigning.

    Philippines:

    The University of the Philippines' School of Labor and Industrial Relations offers the Master of Industrial Relations (MIR) program which aims to train qualified students, staff/supervisors, and managerial members of business enterprises, unions, NGOs and government agencies, and educational institutions for a professional career in labour relations and human resource development/management.

    Some of the Core and Elective Courses for the MIR Degree which are addressed by this qualification are:
  • Organization and Work. Perspectives on organization and work, workplace diversity and change, workplace flexibility.
  • Collective bargaining, strikes, and disputes settlement in the context of industrial democracy. This is very pertinent to this qualification.
  • Work conditions, safety and health, gender equality and related issues in hiring and promotion and affirmative action.
  • Basic research concepts.

    Areas of Specialisation:

    Labour-Management Relations:
  • Collective Bargaining and Negotiations (3 units). Philosophy, structures.
  • Practice of collective bargaining and negotiations.
  • Forms of workers' protest and the resolution of industrial conflicts.

    Comparative Industrial Relations:
  • IR 231: Comparative Labour Movements.
  • Evaluation and role of labour movements in selected countries of Europe, North America, Africa, Latin America and Asia.

    The United States:

    Wayne State University in Detroit in the United States offers a number of short courses between four to seven weeks on a variety of subjects for organisers in the trade union movement.

    Designed for union leaders, staff and activists, these courses and workshops present union skills in a concentrated format. Case histories, simulations, and up-to-date materials give participants the chance to learn new skills and refine old ones.

    The Four to Seven Week Courses:

    Leading a Diverse Union:

    This course is designed to increase cultural awareness, examine the changing nature of the workforce, and develop practical skills to ensure all members are treated with respect and that diversity is valued as strength in the union.

    Labour Law:

    Learn the legal principles that govern the relationship between unions and employers and, unions and its members by reviewing federal and state laws, court decisions and NLRB-MERC rulings. You will examine the laws around "concerted activity", the duty to bargain in good faith, unfair labour practices, the duty of fair representation and the rights granted unions during organizing campaigns.

    Grievance Handlers Series:

    This training series covers the essential knowledge and skills for effective grievance handling which is an important part of this trade union qualification.

    Investigating, Writing and Presenting Grievances.

    Be an effective advocate when investigating, writing and presenting grievances. This course shows you the dos and don'ts of effective grievance handling, how to access employer held information and how to write and present a grievance confidently.

    Arbitration Preparation:

    This course will develop the skills of the novice and strengthen the skills of any experienced advocate. You will analyze sample disciplinary cases and prepare effective arguments around "just cause" principles and evidence gathered in preparation for an arbitration hearing.

    Bargaining and Negotiation Series:

    Collective Bargaining:

    Whether you are a union negotiator or simply want a better understanding of this important process, this two-week course provides practical skills and knowledge related to contract negotiations. This course examines the legal framework of collective bargaining: the dynamics of the collective bargaining process; reaching an agreement and avoiding impasse; costing wages and benefits; and contract campaigns and the strategic use of power.

    Costing-Out the Contract:

    Both union and management employer negotiators must be able to estimate the cost of any proposed change to the collective bargaining agreement. This course enables the learner to calculate the costs associated with changes in wages, paid holidays, and pension and health care benefits, as well as roll-up costs associated with the impact of wage changes on fringe benefit costs.

    Negotiating Effectively: Interest-Based Bargaining:

    This course will enable union (and management) participants to recognize and avoid the biases and psychological traps that limit bargaining effectiveness; utilize the principles and practices of highly effective negotiators; and apply a systematic framework for improving negotiation outcomes. Special attention will be given to the application of these principles and practices of labor-management negotiations and problem solving.

    Custom Training for Union Leaders and Staff:

    The courses below are designed to increase the leadership abilities and personal effectiveness of union leader and staff. They can all be customized to fit specific needs.

    Leadership Development:

    This course examines the nature of leadership and its critical role in building the union. Participants develop a practical set of skills for use in their everyday leadership of than union. These include planning, problem solving, communicating effectively, building a team and leading volunteers.

    Valuing Diversity:

    This course increases awareness and understanding of diversity, the changing nature of the work force, barriers to cultural diversity, and policies and practices to ensure that all members are treated with respect and that diversity is valued as a strength.

    Union Involvement:

    This course examines the nature and development of the union and its role in the workplace and the larger society. Among the topics covered are the history and development of the union and the American labor movement; the role of union in the social, political and economic life of the United States; the structure and administration of the union; and an examination of current issues facing the union.

    Financial Officer Training:

    This course provides union members with the knowledge and skills necessary to function effectively as local union financial officers and trustees. Topics include: the duties and responsibilities of financial officers and trustees, accounting policies and procedures, preparing budgets and financial statements, preparing audits, and financial reporting requirements. Specific topics will vary from year to year.

    Human and Civil Rights Committees:

    This course provides participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to function effectively as members of local union human and civil rights committees. Topics include: the duties and responsibilities of human and civil rights commit- tees; racism, sexism, and ethnocentrism; other diversity issues - age, religion, sexual preference, disabilities; employment discrimination law; and union strategies to build solidarity. Specific topics will vary from year to year.

    Health and Safety Committees:

    This course provides participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to insure a safe and healthy workplace. Topics include: worker rights under OSHA and the union contract, the identification and control of workplace hazards, the reduction of the use of hazardous materials, the use of ergonomics in the workplace, and the role of health and safety committees. Specific topics will vary from year to year.

    Canada:

    The Department of Labour Studies of Athabasca University in Canada also offers a series of course which parallel the competencies in the National Diploma: Trade Union Practice at NQF Level 5 through distance education.

    History of Canadian Labour:

    This course is designed to provide you with an extensive and detailed investigation of Canadian labour and working-class history. It consists of eight units covering the period from 1800 to 2000.

    Outline of the Course:
  • Unit 1: Producers and Paternalism in Pre-Industrial Society.
  • Unit 2: Industrial Capitalism and Early Unionism, 1850-1880.
  • Unit 3: The First Working-Class Movement, 1880-1895.
  • Unit 4: The Growth of Labour Militancy, 1895-1920.
  • Unit 5: The Defeat and Reorganization of Labour, 1920-1940.
  • Unit 6: Wartime Militancy and Post-War Compromise, 1940-1960.
  • Unit 7: The Public Sector and the Remaking of the Labour Movement, 1960-1975.
  • Unit 8: The Compromise Ends and the Counter-Attack Begins, 1975-1995.

    Industrial Relations: Labour Relations:

    This is an introduction to the nature and purpose of labour unions in Canada. The course places contemporary labour unions in a labour relations setting. It describes the institutional framework, relates theoretical issues with practical concerns, and encourages students to undertake their own investigations.

    Outline of the Course:
  • Unit 1: Introduction: Labour Unionism.
  • Unit 2: Union Organization.
  • Unit 3: Maintaining and Changing the Organization.
  • Unit 4: Unions and the Political Economy: Context and Impact.
  • Unit 5: Labour Law and Strikes.
  • Unit 6: Challenges Facing Labour Unions.

    Industrial Relations: Rights at Work: Grievance Arbitration:

    This examines the conflicting rights of workers and management under a collective agreement, conventionally known as "grievance arbitration." The course is intended primarily for trade unionists and managers whose work requires a detailed understanding of the politics of the collective agreement.

    Outline of the Course:
  • Unit 1: A Critical Look at Grievance Arbitration.
  • Unit 2: Substantive Issues.
  • Unit 3: Procedural Issues.
  • Unit 4: Preparing and Presenting a Grievance at Arbitration.

    Industrial Relations - Collective Bargaining:

    The course is designed to satisfy the needs of both trade unionists and human resource managers who are or might be involved in collective bargaining, as well as students who simply want a better understanding of this important Canadian institution. The course presents collective bargaining within a theoretical framework that highlights some of its historical and legal underpinnings and aspects of industrial relations theory. In addition, it provides practical skills and knowledge related to negotiation and interpretation of collective agreements that will prove useful if planning to practice in the field: insight into some of the main approaches to bargaining and the major principles that guide interpretation; an understanding of selected technical aspects of the process; and an appreciation of the manner in which the institution is being affected by changes in the workplace, society, and our global environment.

    Outline of the Course:
  • Unit 1: Winners and Losers in Collective Bargaining.
  • Unit 2: Parties to Collective Bargaining.
  • Unit 3: Legal and Political Aspects of Collective Bargaining.
  • Unit 4: Collective Bargaining Outcomes: The Agreement.
  • Unit 5: The Bargaining Process.
  • Unit 6: Developments Affecting Collective Bargaining.

    Industrial Relations: Occupational Health and Safety:

    This course examines issues of life and death on the job within their political and economic context. An extensive base of scientific and technical knowledge has been built up in the occupational health and safety field. However, conflicts often persist among practitioners and scholars on even the most basic questions. This is partly because the conflict between workers and managers (or between labour and capital, if you will), which is inherent in the field of industrial relations, is superimposed on the inevitable scientific disagreements. Some of these disagreements are legitimate, viewed on their own terms. Others involve the attempt to use scientific argument as a cloak for policy decisions about the value that should be attached to preserving life and health on the job.

    Outline of the Course:
  • Unit 1: Occupational Health and Safety: An Orientation.
  • Unit 2: Occupational Health and Safety: The Interplay of Law, Politics, and Economics.
  • Unit 3: Occupational Health and Safety: The Interplay of Science, Politics, and Economics.
  • Unit 4: Legal and Institutional Structures: The Politics of Implementation and Enforcement.
  • Unit 5: Globalization and Future Occupational Health and Safety.

    Industrial Relations: Industrial Relations: A Critical Introduction:

    This course provides an overview of industrial relations, and takes a critical look at the following issues:
  • Nature of the employment relationship and its legal framework.
  • Nature of collective bargaining and the politics of collective agreements.
  • Management of industrial relations.
  • Trade unions and the logic of collective actions.
  • Influence of the state on employment relations.

    The thread linking these issues is the interconnection between workplace control, collective bargaining, and the broader economic and political context of work organizations. These interconnections are illustrated by reference to contemporary influences on industrial relations.

    Outline of the Course:
  • Lesson 1: The Labour Market and the Labour Process.
  • Lesson 2: Industrial Relations Theory.
  • Lesson 3: A Closer Look at Industrial Relations Theory.
  • Lesson 4: The Nature of the Employment Relationship.
  • Lesson 5: The Rules of the Game in Legislation.
  • Lesson 6: The Raison d'Ítre of Trade Unionism.
  • Lesson 7: Trade Unions as Organizations.
  • Lesson 8: Collective Bargaining and Collective Agreement.
  • Lesson 9: An Overview of Management.
  • Lesson 10: The Origins of Modern Management.
  • Lesson 11: Human Resource Management.
  • Lesson 12: Restructuring and Globalization.
  • Lesson 13: The New Management of Work.

    Industrial Relations: Labour Law in Canada:

    This course is a senior-level introductory course that examines the legal framework of labour relations and collective agreements, introducing such areas as:

    This course is written primarily for non-lawyer practitioners, trade unionists and their representatives, managers, employers, and employees, who are involved in workplaces where collective bargaining is practiced. It is intended for those whose work requires a detailed understanding of the law governing labour relations including collective bargaining, as well as those who just want to further their understanding of this important area of study.

    Outline of the Course:
  • Unit 1: The Background of Labour Law.
  • Unit 2: Collective Labour Relations: Trade Unions.
  • Unit 3: The Right to Organize.
  • Unit 4: Legal Recognition of Collective Bargaining Rights.
  • Unit 5: The Collective Bargaining Process.
  • Unit 6: Industrial Conflict.
  • Unit 7: Collective Agreements, the International Framework, and Conclusions.

    Labour Studies: Introduction to Labour Studies:

    This course examines the field of labour studies and the place of working people and the labour movement in society. It provides an overview of Canadian labour history, a survey of the social organization of work, and an analysis of the role and function of trade unions.

    Outline of the course:
  • Unit 1: What is Labour Studies?
  • Unit 2: Labour History.
  • Unit 3: Work and the Workplace.
  • Unit 4: Unions, the Economy and Political Action.
  • Unit 5: The Future of Work and Unions.

    Labour Studies: Women, Workers, and Farmers: Histories of North American Popular Resistance:

    This course considers the historical experience of popular ideologies and social movements in North America. More specifically, it assesses the type of ideologies women, farmers, and workers created and utilized as they built social movements of resistance, opposition, and critique in the period between 1860 and 1960.

    In the century under study; feminism, populism, socialism, labourism, and other ideologies came into existence and were taken up by various peoples as they tried to make sense of their place in late nineteenth- and twentieth-century society.

    Outline of the course:
  • Unit 1: Producerism, Labourism, and Socialism in the North American Labour Movements, 1860-1919.
  • Unit 2: Agrarian Movements and the Populist Movement, 1880-1920s.
  • Unit 3: The Women's Movement, 1880s-1920s.
  • Unit 4: The Grounding of Modern Feminism, 1920s-1950s.
  • Unit 5: Communism, Reformism, and Labour, 1920-1960.
  • Unit 6: Twentieth-Century Agrarianism.

    Labour Studies: Women and Unions:

    This is about the relationship between women and unions in Canada. It looks at the development of unions around the turn of the century and how they responded to women who worked for pay, and then the changes in the nature of unions over time and the impact of the growth of women members. In the current context, the course examines what unions have and have not bargained to improve the conditions of women in the labour force; the place of women inside union structures; the concerns of minority group women and how the union movement is handling those; and the question of organizing the majority of non-union women workers.

    Outline of the course:
  • Unit 1: Women and the Early Development of Unions, 1880-1920.
  • Unit 2: The Changing Union Movement.
  • Unit 3: Working For Equality through Unions.
  • Unit 4: Women inside Unions.
  • Unit 5: Organizing the Unorganized.
  • Unit 6: Minority Group Women.

    Labour Studies: What Do Unions Do?:

    This investigates the theory and practice of trade unions in contemporary capitalist societies. The course requires students to read some theoretical and conceptual material on trade union behaviour in capitalist societies, two book-length case studies of unions, and a book-length case study of a strike.

    The purpose of the course is twofold. First, it will expand students' theoretical understanding of trade unionism and the labour movement by getting them to think about the purpose of trade unions. Second, it will encourage students to think critically about actual trade union practice by analysing a series of case studies.

    Upon completion, students should be able to:
  • Discuss the relationship between unions, strikes, workplaces, and the state.
  • Discuss the development of the Energy and Chemical Workers Union in light of Hyman's theoretical discussion of unions.
  • Evaluate the significance of the Hormel strike, and Rachleff's analysis of it in light of Hyman's theoretical discussion of unions.
  • Use Hyman's theoretical discussion of unions to assess White's analysis of women in the Canadian Union of Postal Workers.
  • Comment on the role of trade unions in capitalist societies.

    Outline of the Course:
  • Unit 1: The Political Economy of Trade Unionism.
  • Unit 2: Creating a Canadian Private-sector Union.
  • Unit 3: Private-sector Rank-and-file Militancy.
  • Unit 4: Women in a Public-sector Union.

    Sociology of Work and Industry:

    The focus of this course is work: how it developed into its present forms; how it is organized; how individuals experience it; and the social relationships and institutional frameworks so essential for it to occur.

    By critically examining key concepts, theories and research findings in the sociology of work and industry, the course provides students with a deeper understanding of the dynamics of change and continuity, the basis for cooperation and conflict, and the varieties of human experiences in the world of work.

    Outline of the Course:
  • Unit 1: Industrialization and Capitalism.
  • Unit 2: Theoretical Perspectives on Capitalism.
  • Unit 3: Labour Force Trends.
  • Unit 4: Sociology of Labour Markets.
  • Unit 5: Women's Employment.
  • Unit 6: Organizing and Managing Work.
  • Unit 7: Unions and Industrial Relations.
  • Unit 8: Critical Perspectives on Work.
  • Unit 9: How Individuals Experience Work.

    India:

    In India the Indian National Trade Union Congress constitutes of a large number of trade unions totalling 4.6 million members.

    The main activities of the federation are:
  • Occupational Health.
  • Information/training and education.
  • Monitoring of implementation of legislation.
  • Guiding industrial unions.

    They do conduct a large number of National/Regional/Local Training Courses/Seminars/Workshops for trade Union Leaders and workers at all levels for different durations.

    However, there are no details about the content of the training programmes that they conduct for their unions.

    Australia:

    The Australian Council of Trade Unions offers several courses for organisers.

    Fundamentals of Organising:

    The learning outcomes are:
  • Understand the historical context of unions in Australia and the need for growth.
  • Understand the industrial relations framework and how to operate in it in a way which promotes union growth.
  • Become familiar with the organising frameworks and practise some of the skills involved in identifying issues, developing activists, mapping the workplace and holding one on one conversations.
  • Understand the importance of developing networks such as workplace organising committees and developing an agenda for these networks.
  • Understand the principles of negotiation and learn how to apply them to promote union growth.
  • Conduct a SWOT analysis.

    Skills of Organising:

    The learning outcomes are:
  • Resolve some of the problems they have experienced in applying the organising frameworks.
  • Further develop their skills in building networks, developing activists, identifying issues and mapping workplaces.
  • Maximise opportunities for delegate and activist development.
  • Identify what is involved in identifying a target for a successful campaign.
  • Develop a detailed organising plan which incorporates the organising frameworks and which is suitable for the industry involved.
  • Understand how to step out the stages of the plan.
  • Develop strategies for dealing with management tactics aimed at weakening union organisation.

    Bargaining under the Federal Workplace Relations Laws:

    This course is designed for all organisers who carry out negotiations with management or organisers and officials who are about to do so.

    The learning outcomes are:
  • Understand agreement making under the Australian IR system.
  • Understand protected industrial action and how to conduct secret ballots successfully.
  • Develop bargaining strategies that involve members and lead to good outcomes.
  • Develop their bargaining skills and techniques.
  • Examine current management strategies and develop proactive union bargaining strategies.
  • Learn how to develop a bargaining plan which helps grow union membership and membership commitment.
  • Consider alternative dispute resolution mechanisms.
    Advanced Organising Skills - Delegate Development.

    This course is designed for organisers who want to find out more about how adults learn and develop their training and mentoring skills.

    On completion of this course, participants will be able to:
  • Understand the principles of adult learning.
  • Know how to use these principles in developing their key delegates and activists.
  • Develop ways of ensuring formal training is reinforced to promote activism.
  • Know how to organise and deliver an informal training session.
  • Identify opportunities in union bargaining and campaigning activities that promote learning at work.
  • Encourage delegates to look for learning opportunities for their own members that will strengthen the union.

    Craft of Organising:

    On completion of this course, participants will be able to:
  • Plan to improve their use of the organising frameworks and learn from other unions good practice.
  • Learn about the latest trends in the industrial relations climate and the capacity of unions to achieve growth and effectiveness.
  • Develop more complex campaign skills and learn how to link campaigns to a strategy for their industry.
  • Learn about the critical role of planning in all aspects of a campaign, including the need to maintain campaign plans and ensure accountability.
  • Put this learning into practice through a campaigning scenario.
  • Explore how to develop community and political involvement in campaign activities.
  • Understand the role of education and practice applying training skills to delegate and activist development.

    Occupational Health and Safety Skills for Organisers:

    This course is for organisers who need to know more about occupational health and safety issues and how to promote safe and healthy workplaces.

    On completion of this course, participants will be able to:
  • Articulate a union approach to OH&S, based on workers rights.
  • Critically examine management behaviour based approaches to OH&S.
  • Understand legal rights and their limitations, both state based and federal.
  • Understand how workplace hazards are identified and effectively controlled or eliminated.
  • Understand the importance of union involvement in monitoring the workplace and dealing with OH&S issues.
  • Explore how OH&S issues can strengthen union involvement in the workplace and contribute to organising and campaigning.

    Workplace Union Leaders:

    On completion of this course participants will be able to:
  • Understand our union history.
  • Plan an organising campaign.
  • See what is involved in moving people to join and become active in the union.
  • Develop a workplace organising committee.
  • Understand the industrial framework unions operate in.
  • Understand basic negotiation principles and practice putting these into action.
  • Identify what is involved in running a campaign.

    Courses for OHS Specialists:

    The following courses are offered in this aspect:
  • Certificate IV in Occupational Health ad Safety: Blended Course.
  • Certificate IV in Occupational Health ad Safety: Online Course.
  • OHS Skills of Organising.

    These courses are for union trainers who deliver OHS training; union officials and organisers involved in OHS issues and safety representatives who wish to gain a formal qualification and increase their knowledge and involvement in OHS application and policy-making in Australian workplaces.

    On completion of this course, participants will be able to:
  • Understand the union approach to occupational health and safety.
  • Explore the link between organising and OHS structures and issues in the workplace.
  • Familiarize themselves with OHS laws and the rights they contain.
  • Understand what is involved in hazard identification and the effective control of the hazards.
  • Critically examine the concept of risk assessment and management systems.
  • Explore the role unions can play in OHS consultative process.

    Advanced Negotiation Skills:

    On completion of this course, participants will be able to:
  • Identify the different phases of negotiation and understand what is involved in preparing for negotiations.
  • Identify a range of different styles and techniques of negotiations and understand the significance of body language.
  • Identify the use of conflict in negotiations and conflict resolution.
  • Develop an effective negotiating plan.
  • Know how to evaluate and review a negotiation.

    Qualifications in Australia:
  • Certificate IV in Occupational Health and Safety.
  • Certificate IV in Training and Assessment.
  • Diploma of Unionism.

    Certificate IV in Unionism:

    The program aims to recruit people into unions and train them in the skills of organising and recruitment. The program also seeks to inject resources into the union movement to enable effective and sustained campaigns, utilising new and innovative approaches to organising. The trainee's major role is to work at a grass-roots level recruiting and organising principally in non-union areas. The program has proven successful as a means of recruiting more women, young people and workers from diverse ethnic backgrounds into the union movement.

    ECC also delivers the Certificate IV in Unionism qualification to individual unions via face to face training sessions stretching over a number of weeks. There is some flexibility in the curriculum which can be negotiated to meet the specific needs of unions.

    Generally, the course covers a curriculum that includes:
  • Union values.
  • Union organising.
  • Negotiations and the bargaining process.
  • The Industrial Relations Framework in Australia.
  • Occupational Health and Safety.
  • IT skills for unionists.
  • Delegate development.
  • Unions and the wider society.

    Diploma of Unionism:

    ECC offers the following 3 units of competency from the Diploma:
  • Develop, implement and manage union policy.
  • Coordinate research and analysis.
  • Manage projects.

    European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC):

    The ETUI-REHS Education Department provides the training services of the ETUC.

    The Department's role is to devise and deliver training programmes for the ETUC as a whole and to develop the European dimension in trade union education at all levels. Its main tasks are to hold seminars and workshops at European level, and to offer support for the trade union training activities undertaken by the member organisations.

    The aims of some of ETUC's short courses are given below:

    Free movement of workers:

    Aims:
  • To have a better understanding of the role in which European trade unions can achieve minimum standards at the European level whilst respecting working conditions in host countries.
  • To get to know how to influence the national legislation process on regulating issues concerning the free movement of workers.
  • To exchange practical experiences and best practices on dealing with open labour markets.
  • To build up trade unions capacity to deals with the issue of migration (migrant workers).
  • To develop trade union activities for joint action and mutual support.

    Increasing the number of women in decision-making positions within trade unions.

    Aims:
  • To identify good practice in trade union policies to increase the number of women in decision-making positions.
  • To provide for an exchange of experiences on these trade union policies.

    Recruiting and organising:

    Aims:
  • To evaluate union recruitment and organising strategies and practices for union growth.
  • To analyse organisational change and steps towards overcoming resistance to organisational change.
  • To have a better understanding on the importance of change in recruitment methods and to consider introducing new recruitment methods.

    How to improve collective bargaining in Europe:

    Aims:
  • To analyse the latest trends in collective bargaining in EMCEF sectors in Europe.
  • To examine under what conditions cross-border agreements can be concluded at company level in Europe.

    Restructuring in the wood and furniture industry:

    Aims:
  • To analyse the trends in the wood and furniture industry regarding relocation, restructuring and their possible impacts on employment in the sector.
  • To examine how trade unions and EWCS can influence changes in those sectors by participating actively in anticipation of such changes.

    The Trade Union Education Network in Central and Eastern Europe (TUEN) also provides expensive trade union training for its members. The project aims to strengthen trade union organisations in Central and Eastern Europe by emphasising the importance of trade union education. Particular attention will be paid to three issues: integration of equality concern into negotiation of collective agreements, organising non-organised workers (employees) and better knowledge of the European Social "model" to develop organisations' own experience and practice.

    The ultimate aim of the project is to set up a proper trade union network across the region, capable of developing and running joint projects, on a bilateral or multilateral basis, of pooling resources to develop the tools they need, and of defining jointly proposals for the development of workers' and trade union education, to be discussed with employers' representatives and the public authorities.

    In Poland, Bulgaria and Hungary TUEN offers training in:
  • Organising.
  • Organising and Recruiting.
  • Trade Union Rights.
  • Equality in Transition Countries.

    Nigeria:

    The Nigeria Labour Congress\Commonwealth Trade Union Council Project has been promoting women's participation in the trade union movement through training.

    The Main activities outlined for the Project will be:
  • Monitoring and analysis of national policies and legislation from a gender perspective by the Programme Officer in cooperation with the NLC Gender Desk Officer.
  • Analysis of union collective bargaining agendas and agreements by the Programme Officer in cooperation with women members of NLC affiliates.
  • Training programmes on the research findings and bargaining skills for women staff, organizers, campaigners and women and men negotiators.
  • Gender awareness workshops for union leaders to encourage mainstreaming of gender issues in union programmes.

    The Canadian Labour Congress's Trade Union Education project aims to support the renewal process undertaken by the Nigeria Labour Congress (NLC) to institute a clear, accountable and comprehensive framework for trade union activity within strengthened internal democratic structures. In order to support this process, the project will assist in the implementation of a trade union education programme, inspired by the CLC Schools.

    A programme comprising two annual school sessions will be held, each one offering 5-day courses to three (3) target groups, namely shop stewards or workplace representatives, state-level representatives and national leaders. The courses will focus on organizational management, women leadership development, advanced leadership development, organizers skills development, and facilitators training.

    Angola:

    Trade Union Training will be conducted by Sindicato Nacional de Professores (SINPROF) in conjunction with Union of Education Norway (UEN).

    The aim of the training is to contribute to the work SINPROF is doing to strengthen the union's structure and become an influential trade union when the national educational policy is developed.

    Public Services International (PSI) is a global union federation made up of more than 650 trade unions. It works in Ghana, Nigeria and Sierra Leone to strengthen the capacity of unions to effectively service their membership and safeguard their interests. An initial sub regional planning workshop assisted unions to select priority issues; recruitment, collective bargaining, gender equity, financial management and a capacity to respond to privatisation.

    Ghana:

    The Trades Union Congress (TUC) of Ghana is the main umbrella organization for trade union activities in Ghana. The Ghana TUC has made the education of its members one of its priority concerns. The Labour College, which is regarded as the focal point for developing and managing the educational programmes, has the following specific functions:
  • Train trainers and develop a pool of educators to handle trade union education and compile a list of trainers for the national unions and regions.
  • Implement a comprehensive education and training programme for the trade union movement.
  • Promote learning and studying in the labour movement by organizing seminars, outreach programmes, academic and non-academic courses and discussions.

    Training programmes are being organized for various categories of members and officers such as shop stewards, local/branch officers, union staff/field officers, national officers/members of the Executive Board, and women/youth activists.

    Training at the Labour College covers three broad areas; trade union education (collective bargaining, grievance handling, organizational skills, health and safety, conduct of meetings and labour laws); trade union history (in Ghana and generally, but with special reference to European trade union history); and special programmes, covering topical issues of interest both at home and worldwide. Basic accounting is offered for some levels of officers.

    Eritrea, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda:

    In Eritrea, the National Confederation of Eritrean Workers (NCEW) was established in 1994 with an independent structure; in Kenya, the Central Organization of Trade Unions - Kenya (COTU - K) has 32 affiliates; in Tanzania, the Trade Union Congress of Tanzania (TUCTA) has 12 affiliates and in Uganda, the National Organization of Trade Unions (NOTU) has 21 affiliates.

    Training of in employment policies and such kind are normally conducted at international level by global unions such as the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions ( ICFTU), International Union of Food, Agricultural, Hotel, Restaurant, Catering, Tobacco and Allied Workers' Associations (IUF), and Public Services International ( PSI). However, few trade union members are exposed to this kind of training generally. However, the focus is mainly trainers, educators and some of the General Secretaries.

    In Kenya COTU - K has offered the following training:
  • Paralegal training course.
  • Globalization, Regionalisation and Labour Movement challenges.
  • Arbitration/Productivity/Wage Setting/Negotiations.

    In conclusion, Qualifications similar to this one could not be found. Some certificates have been listed. Although these contain some of the competencies of this Qualification, they fall far short of the extent of learning contained in this Qualification. The National Diploma: Trade Union Practice is also much more intense and concentrated than the other training courses listed above. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This Qualification lends itself to both vertical and horizontal articulation possibilities.

    Horizontal articulation is possible with the following Qualifications:
  • ID 59201: National Certificate: Generic Management, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 49257: National Certificate: National Certificate: Conflict Management and Transformation, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 20159: National Diploma: ABET Practice, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 48641: National Certificate: Labour Relations Practice, Level 5
  • ID 49784: National Diploma: Labour Relations Practice: Dispute Resolution, Level 5

    Vertical articulation is possible with the following Qualifications:
  • ID 16759: National Diploma: Labour Relations, NQF Level 6.
  • Bachelor: Occupationally Directed Education Training and Development Practices, NQF Level 6.
  • ID 50331: National Certificate: Occupationally Directed Education, Training and Development Practices, NQF Level 6.
  • ID 20485: National First Degree: ABET Practice, NQF Level 6. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against this Qualification must be registered as an assessor with the relevant Education, Training, Quality, and Assurance (ETQA) Body.
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this Qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA.
  • Assessment and moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA according to the ETQA's policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation; in terms of agreements reached around assessment and moderation between ETQA's (including professional bodies); and in terms of the moderation guideline detailed immediately below.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments at exit points of the Qualification, unless ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described both in individual unit standards, the integrated competence described in the Qualification and will include competence within core sales and the elective standards relevant to the economic sector.

    Anyone wishing to be assessed against this Qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    For an applicant to register as an assessor, the applicant needs:
  • A relevant Qualification at NQF Level 6 or higher.
  • To be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  255762  Apply basic research methodology and ethics  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  243848  Demonstrate an understanding of the trade union movement  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  243847  Organise and mobilise workers  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Core  120300  Analyse leadership and related theories in a work context  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  258099  Analyse working class theories  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  242869  Apply an understanding of the characteristics of the South African Labour Market  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244514  Apply occupational health, safety and environmental legislation in the workplace  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
    Core  11983  Compile and administer a case docket for investigation purposes  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  258098  Conduct negotiations to advance the interests of workers  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  258097  Demonstrate an understanding of the legislative framework governing collective bargaining from a trade union perspective  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  258096  Demonstrate an understanding of the sociology of work  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
    Core  258101  Demonstrate an understanding of the theory of collective bargaining  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  114224  Demonstrate and apply an understanding of the CCMA rules  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  119665  Demonstrate understanding of the concept of human rights and democracy and its application in society  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
    Core  116948  Develop a programme that demonstrates effective ways of dealing with the effects of terminal and chronic illnesses, particularly HIV/Aids, in a workplace  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
    Core  10043  Develop, implement and manage a project/activity plan  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  123398  Facilitate the transfer and application of learning in the workplace  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  10044  Implement a generic communication strategy  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  119941  Manage and conduct an arbitration process  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
    Core  258095  Organise a strike to advance worker interests  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Core  252038  Prepare and manage a budget  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  119944  Analyse and interpret unfair dismissal in dispute resolution  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  10 
    Core  254418  Design and develop policy in respect of gender equality and women's empowerment  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  10 
    Core  13021  Provide advice to clients on the legal principles of labour law  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Fundamental  252042  Apply the principles of ethics to improve organisational culture  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  258100  Explain the theory of political economy  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  20 
    Elective  120392  Apply the concept and principles of knowledge management to leadership  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  110003  Develop administrative procedures in a selected organisation  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  120390  Develop and apply a service culture to a leadership role  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  110000  Generate information and reports for internal and external use  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  110009  Manage administration records  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  252030  Analyse compliance to legal requirements and recommend corrective actions  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  120304  Analyse, interpret and communicate information  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  252026  Apply a systems approach to decision making  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  243267  Apply and continuously improve company policies and procedures  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Elective  15234  Apply efficient time management to the work of a department/division/section  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  252031  Apply the principles and concepts of emotional intelligence to the management of self and others  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  252044  Apply the principles of knowledge management  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  120311  Apply visionary leadership to develop strategy  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Elective  15231  Create and use a range of resources to effectively manage teams, sections, departments or divisions  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  115855  Create, maintain and update record keeping systems  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  15219  Develop and implement a strategy and action plans for a team, department or division  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  252027  Devise and apply strategies to establish and maintain workplace relationships  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  120301  Formulate and evaluate public sector policies and regulations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  116924  Implement a programme of diversity management in the workplace  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  14 
    Elective  116926  Implement skills development as workplace learning to support organisational transformation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
    Elective  244254  Manage the mainstreaming of gender in programmes and projects  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Elective  13627  Analyse different perspectives on learning and learning processes  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  14 
    Elective  254417  Assess, monitor and evaluate organisational compliance with policies on gender equality and women's empowerment  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  10 
    Elective  254458  Design and implement a communication strategy that supports gender equality and women's empowerment  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Elective  120306  Manage service delivery improvement  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.