SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

Further Education and Training Certificate: Volunteer Support 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
61609  Further Education and Training Certificate: Volunteer Support 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Sport, Recreation & Fitness 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
The individual Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary for each Learning Programme recorded against this qualification is shown in the table at the end of this report.  SFAP - Sub-framework Assignment Pending 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
Further Ed and Training Cert  Field 02 - Culture and Arts  Sport 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  138  Level 4  NQF Level 04  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2021-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2022-06-30   2025-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

This qualification is intended to meet the needs of individuals involved in or envisaging involvement in a voluntary capacity in a broad range of sectors making use of voluntary workers. The skills and competencies gained will enable effective contribution in operational environments in a voluntary capacity.

The focus of the qualification enables learners to be competent in a range of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values including:
  • Understanding the role and function of volunteers.
  • Applying customer care and service.
  • Understanding cultural differences and diversity in the operational environment.
  • Working as part of a team.
  • Gathering and analyzing information.
  • Complying with operational standards and requirements.
  • Applying ethical behaviour in operational environments.
  • Communicating effectively as per operational requirements.

    Learners achieving this qualification will be able to demonstrate competencies in volunteer operations relating to a specific environment. In particular, learners will be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of volunteerism as it applies to the operational environment.
  • Participate in and support the operational objectives of a project, initiative or event on a voluntary basis.
  • Work with members of a team to meet operational standards and objectives.
  • Interact with clients to meet operational objectives.

    Rationale:

    The involvement of individuals in a voluntary capacity in different environments within a range of sectors in South Africa is a reality. Examples of volunteerism include:
  • Sport: Involvement in sport coaching, officiating, administration and hosting of events in all codes of sport at all levels.
  • Events: Participation and support of events such as conferencing, exhibitions, expos, workshops, indabas, product launches, marketing and retail and promotional events.
  • Tourism: Involvement in tourism promotions, destination promotion, functions, guided experiences and similar initiatives by the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT) for tourism promotion in South Africa.
  • Community Development: Involvement in community outreach programmes and community development initiatives.
  • Recreation: Involvement in Leisure and Recreation activities or events including festivals, music and cultural events, celebrations, coordinating competitions and fundraising.
  • Social Development programmes and initiatives: Involvement in social development programmes and initiatives such as feeding programmes or victim empowerment.

    Two of the main benefits of volunteerism are economical and social. The provision of services in a voluntary capacity adds to the overall economic output and human resources develoment of a sector and the country at large, whilst social benefit is derived from the facilitation of community cohesion and the fostering of trust between citizens.

    Over and above these two benefits, a culture of volunteerism has the potential of enabling contribution towards nation building and transformation. This is achievable both in terms of the provision of voluntary service for philanthropic and altruistic reasons as well as the enabling of opportunties for the gaining of experience through the involvement of individuals in voluntary activities for the purpose of gaining experience in and access to a specific field of interest.

    The approach followed will largely be influenced by the diverse demographic profile of the individual involved in volunteering. The utilisation of the qualification in volunteer operations will support access, redress and a culture of life-long learning.

    South Africa is hosting the FIFA 2010 World Cup and there are endless opportunities for South Africans to contribute to and benefit from this major sporting event. The South African Government commenced with a strategy of exploring volunteerism towards 2010 and beyond and the qualification thus enables the mobilization of volunteerism within this context.

    This qualification will fast track the development of individuals in the volunteer movement and mass participation opportunities to achieving nationally recognised, occupationally directed competencies and skills, thus establishing a pool of highly skilled, competent individuals who will deliver professional performance in the sectors where their services are accessed. Voluntary participation will enhance service delivery and will provide opportunities to the unemployed, youth, people with disability and women for the obtaining of skills, which could lead to job-creation and self-employment. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    It is assumed that learners are competent in:
  • Communication at NQF Level 3.

    Recognition of Prior Learning:

    This Qualification can be achieved wholly or in part through the Recognition of Prior Learning and the Qualification may be granted to learners who have acquired the skills and knowledge without attending formal courses providing they can demonstrate competence in the outcomes of the individual Unit Standards as required by the Fundamental, Core and Elective areas stipulated in the Qualification and by the Exit Level Outcomes.

    An RPL process may also be used to credit learners with Unit Standards in which they have developed the necessary competency as a result of workplace and experiential learning. RPL may also be used by learners, who are not in possession of a GETC or equivalent qualification, to gain access to the Qualification.

    Learners submitting themselves for RPL should be thoroughly briefed prior to the assessment, and will be required to submit a Portfolio of Evidence in the prescribed format to be assessed for formal recognition. While this is primarily a workplace-based Qualification, evidence from other areas of endeavour may be introduced if pertinent to any of the exit level outcomes.

    Access to the Qualification:

    Access to this qualification is open however learners should have access to a suitable workplace environment. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    The qualification is made up of Fundamental, Core and Elective unit standards. A minimum of 138 Credits is required to complete the qualification.

    Fundamental component:
  • All unit standards totalling 56 Credits are compulsory.

    Core component:
  • All unit standards totalling 57 Credits are compulsory.

    Elective component:
  • Learners must choose an Elective stream and select unit standards totalling a minimum of 25 Credits from the unit standards listed for this specialisation stream.

    Where a specialisation stream has unit standards totalling less than 25 credits, learners can select additional credits from the other elective streams of the qualification in order to meet the minimum required for the qualification.

    The following Elective Streams are provided for specialisation purposes in the qualification:

    Management and Leadership (Learning Programme ID 64109):
  • ID 252179: Manage volunteers in sport, NQF Level 5, 5 Credits.
  • ID 243947: Develop self within the job role, NQF Level 4, 4 Credits.
  • ID 119730: Co-ordinate volunteer activities, NQF Level 3, 4 Credits.
  • ID 8665: Lead a team, NQF Level 5, 4 Credits.
  • ID 120384: Develop a simple schedule to facilitate effective project execution, NQF Level 4, 8 Credits.
  • ID 110025: Process data using information technology, NQF Level 4, 5 Credits.

    Total credits for elective stream: 30 Credits.

    Sport Operations (Learning Programme ID 64110):
  • ID 243298: Apply administrative skills and knowledge in a sport organisation, NQF Level 4, 11 Credits.
  • ID 243296: Apply values and ethics to a sport organisation, NQF Level 4, 3 Credits.
  • ID 243300: Lead a community sport activity, NQF Level 4, 12 Credits.
  • ID 243293: Promote sport activity in a community, NQF Level 4, 4 Credits.
  • ID 242810: Manage Expenditure against a budget, NQF Level 4, 6 Credits.

    Total credits for elective stream: 36 Credits.

    Community Recreation Operations (Learning Programme ID 64111):
  • ID 243615: Manage and lead volunteers in a community recreation environment, NQF Level 4, 4 Credits.
  • ID 254068: Recruit, induct and manage volunteers, NQF Level 5, 6 Credits.

    Total credits for elective stream: 10 Credits.

    Security Operations (Learning Programme ID 64112):
  • ID 244184: Apply legal aspects in a security environment, NQF Level 3, 8 Credits.
  • ID 244177: Conduct a security patrol in a area of responsibility, NQF Level 3, 7 Credits.
  • ID 244179: Handle complaints and problems, NQF Level 3, 6 Credits.
  • ID 244181: Perform hand over and take over responsibilities, NQF Level 3, 2 Credits.
  • ID 244189: Conduct access and egress control, NQF Level 4, 7 Credits.
  • ID 242825: Conduct evacuations and emergency drills, NQF Level 4, 4 Credits.
  • ID 11505: Identify, handle and defuse security related conflict, NQF Level 4, 12 Credits.
  • ID 244335: Conduct security at an event, NQF Level 4, 5 Credits.
  • ID 242835: Operate x-ray screening equipment within a security environment, NQF Level 4, 3 Credits.

    Total credits for elective stream: 54 Credits.

    Events Operations (Learning Programme ID 64113):
  • ID 256114: Perform logistic functions for an event or events business, NQF Level 5, 4 Credits.
  • ID 256075: Plan events, NQF Level 5, 3 Credits.
  • ID 256074: Co-ordinate registration/arrival system for an event, NQF Level 5, 3 Credits.
  • ID 120374: Contribute to the management of project risk within own field of expertise, NQF Level 4, 5 Credits.

    Total credits for elective stream: 15 Credits. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of volunteerism as it applies to the operational environment.

    2. Provide operational support to a project, initiative or event on a voluntary basis.

    3. Work with members of a team to meet operational standards and objectives.

    4. Interact with clients to meet operational objectives.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:

    The qualification addresses all Critical Cross-Field Outcomes as embedded in the unit standards making up the qualification. 

    ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:

    1.1 The concept of volunteerism is defined and described as it applies to the operational environment.
    1.2 Organisational policies and requirements relating to volunteerism are clarified from a personal and operational perspective.
    1.3 Specific operational protocols, reporting structures and requirements are understood as they apply to the environment in which services are provided.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:

    2.1 Operational objectives of the project, initiative or event are clarified and understood in the context of the individual's role and responsibilities as a volunteer.
    2.2 Operational safety requirements are clarified as they apply to the individual's role, responsibilities and levels of authority.
    2.3 Ethical conduct is applied in the execution of individual tasks and responsibilities.
    2.4 Operational tasks and responsibilities are implemented according to identified standards and requirements.
    2.5 Administrative records in support of operational objectives are concluded according to operational standards and requirements.
    2.6 Success of the project, initiative or event is supported through active participation on an individual and team level.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:

    3.1 The individual role and functions of team members are identified in terms of support of operational planning and objectives.
    3.2 Team interaction and feedback requirements are identified and maintained in order to meet operational standards and objectives.
    3.3 Tasks and responsibilities of the team are implemented and maintained according to identified time frames.
    3.4 Team cohesion and dynamics are maintained in the addressing of challenges, the solving of problems and making of decisions required to meet operational standards and objectives.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:

    4.1 Client interaction is described, conducted and promoted according to operational standards and requirements.
    4.2 Spoken and written communication, including listening skills are maintained to enable the flow of information in support of customer service requirements and objectives.
    4.3 Client queries are dealt with accurately and consistently.
    4.4 Special needs and the maintaining of customer care are considered in client interaction.

    Integrated Assessment:

    Integrated assessment at this level will evaluate the learner's ability to combine actions and ideas across a range of activities and knowledge areas. The integrated assessment must specifically assess the learner's ability to:
  • demonstrate competence by means of the practical application of the embedded knowledge in a manner that meets the required performance standards required.
  • illustrate a clear understanding of the concepts, theory and principles that underpin the practical action taken.

    The assessment will require assessment methods, which measure and evaluate evidence generated during on-the job activities. Because assessment practices must be open, transparent, fair, valid and reliable; ensuring that no learner is disadvantaged in any way whatsoever, an integrated assessment approach is incorporated into the qualification.

    A variety of methods must be used in assessment and tools and activities must be appropriate to the context in which the learner is working or will work. Where it is not possible to assess the learner in the workplace, simulations, case studies, role-plays and other similar techniques should be used to provide a context appropriate to the assessment.

    The term integrated assessment implies that theoretical and practical components should be assessed together. Whenever possible the assessment of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values shown in the Unit Standards should be integrated and, during integrated assessment, the assessor should make use of a range of formative and summative assessment tools and methods. Combinations of practical, applied, foundational and reflective competencies should be assessed. Assessment should further ensure that all specific outcomes, embedded knowledge and critical cross-field outcomes are evaluated in an integrated way.

    Assessors must assess and give credit for the evidence of learning that has already been acquired through formal, informal and non-formal learning and work experience as the assessment process is capable of being applied to RPL, subject to the rules and criteria of the relevant ETQA. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    Volunteer services in South Africa are unregulated and dependent on community, organisational and individual initiative. This results in under utilisation of resources. Our country would benefit enormously if a culture of volunteerism and participation in nation building, community service and participative transformation can be established.

    Research on training interventions for volunteers indicated a tendency towards shorter orientation and training interventions, in particular where skilled individuals and individuals such as senior citizens bring a vast range of know-how and experience to the table, are concerned. This is evident from training interventions offered in countries such as Britain, the United States of America, Canada, UK and Singapore. However, the need for training and skills development within the operational focus area appears to be a constant, even in developed countries with well-established volunteer service structures and participation.

    International best practice in volunteer operations training is found in United Nation's countries, especially the G7. The following comparability was made:

    USA and Canada:

    A "Volunteer Training Needs" survey conducted by Sigma Social Research in British Columbia, (incorporating empirical data from 20 established and 4 emerging volunteer centres) and a European Union study towards the promotion of volunteer services in EU member states, highlights the following training needs and requirements for individuals operating as volunteers:
  • Communication Skills.
  • Assertiveness training.
  • Conflict resolution.
  • Self care.
  • Facilitation skills.
  • Interviewing skills.
  • Computer literacy.
  • Basic knowledge of the organisation.
  • Teamwork.
  • Safety.
  • Ethics.
  • Crisis management.
  • Finance.

    When these identified needs are compared with the envisaged FETC: Volunteerism the following areas of alignment are identified:
  • Communication Skills: Communication Literacy as included in the fundamental component.
  • Conflict resolution: Solve problems, make decisions and implement solutions.
  • Computer literacy: Create, maintain and update record keeping systems.
  • Basic knowledge of the organisation: Conduct volunteer services in a specific operational environment.
  • Teamwork: Function in a team and Prioritise time and work for self and team.
  • Safety: Prevent and manage safety and emergency incidents.
  • Ethics: Incorporated in Principles of Volunteering.
  • Crisis management: Prevent and Manage safety and emergency incidents.
  • Finance: Numeric Literacy as included in the fundamental component.

    It was interesting to note that an understanding of volunteerism was not identified as a need and this could potentially be a result of volunteerism featuring so prominently in the countries from where information for comparison was researched.

    The envisaged qualification excludes the following training needs identified internationally:
  • Self care.
  • Facilitation skills.
  • Interviewing skills.
  • Assertiveness training.

    Instead, the addressing of specific South African needs and in particular, the focus of volunteering on the recipients of services, the following competency areas were included:
  • Care for Customers.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of HIV/AIDS in a workplace and its effects on a business sub-sector, own organisation and a specific workplace.
  • Analyse external factors influencing people with special needs.

    It should be noted that the areas of focus incorporated in the envisaged qualification reflects good alignment in terms of a range of shorter courses identified for comparison of international practices:

    United Kingdom:

    Volunteering England identifies the following learning focus areas:
  • Volunteer policies.
  • Health and Safety.
  • Problem solving.
  • Equal opportunities and Diversity.
  • Induction including:
    > History of the organisation.
    > Services orientation.
    > Client groups identification.
    > Clarification of the roles and responsibilities of volunteers.

    Singapore:

    Similar competency focus areas are supported in terms of information obtained from the "Senior Corps Tech Centre", a service of the Corporation of National and Community Service providing support services to volunteer organisations predominantly using volunteer services offered by Senior Citizens in the United States of America; whilst the shorter training interventions indicated as focus areas by the Singapore Civil Defence Volunteers programme focuses more extensively on areas of specialisation relevant to the operational environment.

    China:

    Comparison with the approach followed for the training of volunteers for the Olympic Games, and in particular the training envisaged for the 2008 Beijing Olympic and Paralympic Games, indicates the following general training areas:
  • Basic knowledge about the Olympic and Paralympic Games.
  • Training on the history and culture of China.
  • Knowledge of skills in the service for the disabled.
  • Knowledge and skills for emergency rescue.
  • General knowledge of Olympic Events.
  • General knowledge of Paralympic Events.

    In this instance, the specific focus area in which voluntary services will take place is highlighted and it is interesting to note that there is direct access on the official website.

    Australia:

    Perusal of the approach followed for the training of 50 000 Olympic volunteers in Australia highlights the following training focus areas:
  • Orientation.
  • Job Specific training.
  • Venue Training.
  • Event leadership.
  • Team development - (directed to each functional area of Volunteering).

    The above examples stresses the importance of enabling the application of personal and life skills within a specific operational context to enable event specific training - this approach as followed in the envisaged qualification indicates good comparison with international trends in volunteer training programmes and is enabled by the inclusion of a range of specialisation streams in the elective component of the qualification.

    Although a direct comparison with the Degree in Voluntary Sector Studies Programme offered by the Virtual University in the United Kingdom is not possible because of the differences in NQF Level, it adds value by highlighting the included learning areas.

    The qualification consists of compulsory core modules and optional modules on each of the three levels making up the qualification to a total value of 360 credits. Comparison indicates good alignment in terms of the following focus areas:
  • Interpersonal skills for Volunteers.
  • Organisational Structure.
  • Interpersonal skills in practice.
  • Introduction to Information Technology.
  • Supervision of group workers.
  • Advanced client based voluntary practice.
  • Experiencing disability.
  • Facing the challenges of HIV/AIDS.

    Specific subject areas where comparison was not enabled, include areas such as Volunteer Management, Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology, Religious as well as Organisational Change Management components offered as first, second and third year courses.

    TAFE New South Wales provide 530 course units/modules applicable to specialised areas in which voluntary services are often evident. These include specific modules on volunteering such as unit SRCCRD005B "Apply the principles and issues of volunteering" and unit 1846H "Working with volunteers".

    Units are found in programme and vocational areas including Community Service, Health promotion, Tourism, Recreation, Sport courses including Community Recreation, Fitness, Mental health work, Disability work, Youth work, and Alcohol and other drugs and mental health practices. Although a separate full qualification for Volunteerism could not be accessed, the importance of provision for skills associated with volunteerism can be inferred from the evident inclusion of volunteerism study units as electives in such a broad range of qualifications.

    This approach is presently not evident from a South African perspective, where the envisaged qualification will enable the acquiring of volunteerism related skills both in terms of the application of skills and competencies obtained and the potential accessing of such areas of learning through articulation and portability.

    Again, the strong culture of volunteerism from an Australian perspective could be the reason why the incorporation of units enabling volunteering specific skills is included on a relatively broad scale. This might also explain the difficulties in identifying volunteerism qualifications in isolation as research indicated that the majority of qualifications available in the field of volunteerism focus on the "Management of Volunteers" rather than the provision of skills for individuals operating as volunteers.

    SADC:

    Volunteering South Africa (VOLSA) reported to the United Nations Volunteering (UNV) division on the requirements for national policy development and structuring of volunteering shortly after the conclusion of the Department of Social Development's "Year of Volunteering" initiative in 2002, whilst a SADC study conducted by Volunteer and Service Enquiry Southern Africa (VOSESA) in a cross national study investigating the use of volunteerism in Botswana, Malawi, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe draws attention to the fact that civic service and volunteering programmes are growing in South Africa but that promotion of volunteerism and the development of volunteers in respect of practical and life skills require attention. No specific details on training requirements or offerings could however be identified over and above the affirmation that training is a critical success factor to volunteer programme implementation.

    Conclusion:

    Within the context of 2010 FIFA World Cup, the National Government's goals for the implementation of volunteer programmes, the vision of establishing an African Volunteer Corps via a United Nations Development programme (presently supported by our Department of Social Services) as well as the identified need to address volunteerism training and development, for application beyond 2010, the envisaged qualification enables opportunities for training and development which is aligned with international practices in volunteer training.

    Not only does the qualification compare favourably with the learning areas identified for volunteer training identified from internationally based research studies, it provides for the specific focus areas to enable the addressing of skills from a South African perspective. In particular the focus on customer care, understanding of diversity and the dealing with realities such as HIV/AIDS enables the gaining of relevant personal and life skills as well as the operational competencies required in a specific environment in which voluntary services are provided.

    The international comparison against shorter interventions as observed in a number of volunteer organisations abroad, shows good alignment, and the provision of an option for a full qualification once again can be motivated and supported from a South African perspective where formal volunteerism is clearly in its infancy.

    The South African Youth Service programme (focusing on volunteers between the ages of 16 and 35) clearly states their aim to utilise volunteerism as a vehicle for the enabling of experience gain and the promotion of learning that enable participants to, undertake activities to the standard required by the service in which they are involved, access future learning, access economic empowerment and be active citizens.

    The above clearly supports the need for a qualification enabling volunteer training from a South African perspective.

    It is thus critically important to ensure that volunteer training and a qualification developed to address training interventions for the acquiring of skills and competencies not only compare well with good practices observed internationally, it should likewise enable the addressing of the objectives identified for volunteerism from a South African and African perspective.

    All information obtained in the conducting of international practices considered, there is no particular area of focus identified that raises concern in terms of the meeting of standards of training for volunteerism internationally.

    From a perspective of the recurring indications of and confirmation of the need for training of volunteers, this qualification could enable a first formal full qualification for volunteerism which could add benefit not only from a South African perspective but could also bring benefit from an African perspective in the advancement of an African Volunteer Corps. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This Qualification provides the following articulation opportunities:

    Horizontal articulation:
  • ID 57712: Further Education and Training Certifcate: Generic Management at NQF Level 4.
  • ID 58009: Further Education and Training Certificate: Sport Administration at NQF Level 4.
  • ID 58163: Further Education and Training Certificate: Community Recreation at NQF level 4.
  • ID 49872: Further Education and Training Certificate: Victim Empowerment Coordination at NQF Level 4.

    Vertical articulation:
  • ID 59201:National Certificate: Generic Management at NQF Level 5. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
    Anyone assessing a learner, or moderating the assessment of a learner, against this Qualification must be registered as an assessor/moderator with the relevant ETQA, or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.

    Any institution offering learning that may enable the achievement of this Qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA, or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.

    Assessment and moderation of assessment may be overseen by the relevant ETQA according to the policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation of that ETQA, in terms of agreements reached around assessment and moderation between various ETQAs (including professional bodies), and in terms of the moderation guideline detailed immediately below.

    Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments at all exit points of the Qualification, unless ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described both in individual Unit Standards as well as the integrated competence described in the Exit Level Outcomes of the Qualification.

    Anyone wishing to be assessed against this Qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA, or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.

    The options as listed above provide the opportunity to ensure that assessment and moderation can be transparent, affordable, valid, reliable and non-discriminatory. 

    CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    For an applicant to register as an assessor or moderator of this Qualification the applicant needs:
  • To be declared competent in all the outcomes of the National Assessor Unit Standards.
  • To be in possession of a relevant Qualification at NQF Level 5 or above in the specialist stream chosen. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  13915  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of HIV/AIDS in a workplace, and its effects on a business sub-sector, own organisation and a specific workplace  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  246740  Care for customers  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255915  Conduct volunteer services in a specific environment  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255916  Describe volunteer operations  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  120077  Implement volunteer projects  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255914  Minimise and manage safety and emergency incidents  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  242811  Prioritise time and work for self and team  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  256094  Provide operational support for a minor event  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  242817  Solve problems, make decisions and implement solutions  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  115855  Create, maintain and update record keeping systems  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244594  Identify and recommend support needs of people with disabilities  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  119472  Accommodate audience and context needs in oral/signed communication  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119457  Interpret and use information from texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119467  Use language and communication in occupational learning programmes  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119465  Write/present/sign texts for a range of communicative contexts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9015  Apply knowledge of statistics and probability to critically interrogate and effectively communicate findings on life related problems  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119462  Engage in sustained oral/signed communication and evaluate spoken/signed texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119469  Read/view, analyse and respond to a variety of texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  9016  Represent analyse and calculate shape and motion in 2-and 3-dimensional space in different contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  7468  Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal, business, national and international issues  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  12153  Use the writing process to compose texts required in the business environment  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119459  Write/present/sign for a wide range of contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  244184  Apply legal aspects in a security environment  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  119730  Co-ordinate volunteer activities  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  244177  Conduct a security patrol in an area of responsibility  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  244179  Handle complaints and problems  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  244181  Perform hand over and take over responsibilities  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  116720  Show understanding of diversity in the workplace  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  243298  Apply administrative skills and knowledge in a sport organisation  Level 4  NQF Level 04  11 
    Elective  243296  Apply values and ethics to a sport organisation  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  244189  Conduct access and egress control  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  242825  Conduct evacuations and emergency drills  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  244335  Conduct security at an event  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  8490  Contribute to sustainable tourism in South Africa  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  120374  Contribute to the management of project risk within own field of expertise  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  117499  Demonstrate entrepreneurial competence  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Elective  120384  Develop a simple schedule to facilitate effective project execution  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  243947  Develop self within the job role  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  11505  Identify, handle and defuse security related conflict  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Elective  243300  Lead a community sport activity  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Elective  243615  Manage and support volunteers in a community recreation environment  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  242810  Manage Expenditure against a budget  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  242835  Operate x-ray screening equipment within a security environment  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  110025  Process data using information technology  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  243293  Promote sport activity in a community  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  243949  Source information about self-employment opportunities  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  7935  Analyse the tourism industry and the links between the various sectors  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  256074  Co-ordinate registration/arrival system for an event  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  8665  Lead a team  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  252179  Manage Volunteers in sport  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  256114  Perform logistic functions for an event or events business  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  256075  Plan events  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  254068  Recruit, induct and manage volunteers  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    LP ID Learning Programme Title Originator Pre-2009
    NQF Level
    NQF Level Min Credits Learning Prog End Date Quality
    Assurance
    Functionary
    NQF Sub-Framework
    64111  Further Education and Training Certificate: Volunteer Support: Community Recreation Operations  Generic Provider - Field 02  Level 4  NQF Level 04  138     CATHSSETA  OQSF 
    64113  Further Education and Training Certificate: Volunteer Support: Events Operations  Generic Provider - Field 11  Level 4  NQF Level 04  138     CATHSSETA  OQSF 
    64109  Further Education and Training Certificate: Volunteer Support: Management and Leadership  Generic Provider - Field 03  Level 4  NQF Level 04  138     CATHSSETA  OQSF 
    64112  Further Education and Training Certificate: Volunteer Support: Security Operations  Generic Provider - Field 08  Level 4  NQF Level 04  138     SAS SETA  OQSF 
    64110  Further Education and Training Certificate: Volunteer Support: Sport Operations  Generic Provider - Field 02  Level 4  NQF Level 04  138     CATHSSETA  OQSF 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THESE LEARNING PROGRAMMES: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.