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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

National Certificate: Polygraphy 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
59258  National Certificate: Polygraphy 
ORIGINATOR
Task Team - Polygraphy 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
SAS SETA - Safety and Security SETA  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Certificate  Field 08 - Law, Military Science and Security  Safety in Society 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  120  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2023-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2024-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

The National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 will equip learners to undertake industrial and legislative enquiries or investigations. It will upgrade the standard of polygraphy training and testing in South Africa and provide a necessary standard for the development and assessment of polygraphy courses.

The focus of the National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 is the ethical administration and interpretation of polygraph examinations. Learners are expected to understand the main areas of polygraphy, including an understanding of the key terms, concepts, facts, established principles, rules, theories and origins. They are required to select and apply standard methods, procedures, and/or techniques of polygraphy within a supported environment. Learners should be capable of identifying, evaluating and solving defined, routine and new problems within a familiar context, and to applying solutions based on relevant evidence and procedures and/or other forms of explanation. They are expected to act in accordance with organisational ethical codes of conduct, values and practices and to seek guidance on ethical and professional issues where necessary. They are required to gather information from a range of sources, to select information appropriate to the task, and to apply basic processes of analysis, synthesis and evaluation on that information. They require an ability to communicate information reliably, accurately and coherently, using conventions appropriate to polygraphy, either in writing, verbally or in practical demonstration, including an understanding of and respect for conventions around intellectual property, copyright and plagiarism.

The purpose of the Qualification is to:
  • Give more credibility to the examination and protection of a subject.
  • Give more credibility to the weighing of the examiner's opinion.
  • Promote legal acceptance.
  • Produce properly trained polygraphers who have a moral obligation to conduct ethical polygraph examinations.

    The National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 will be useful for:
  • Graduates (ideally with psychology as a major) as an add-on occupational Qualification to equip learners to practise as polygraphers.
  • In the interim for people currently operating as polygraphers who do not hold a formal qualification in polygraphy.
  • Polygraph examiners in Private Practice, employees in Statutory Intelligence, the South African Police Service, National Prosecuting Authority and Lawyers.

    Rationale:

    The National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 was developed at the request of the polygraph industry as there is an urgent need for accredited training for polygraphers. In the 1980's most South African polygraphers were trained in Israel. Post 1994 many polygraphers previously employed by Government went into private practice. Most new learners in the field were trained in the United States of America (USA) where training is governed by Federal and State legislation. From 1998, two American Schools offered polygraph training courses in South Africa based on the American Curriculum. The training does not take into account the issues of diversity which are significant features of the South African situation and learners are required to contextualise and apply their learning to the South African situation themselves. The American training is very expensive and beyond the reach of most South Africans.

    Polygraph Examinations are increasingly being used in both the public and private sectors to protect economic activities and maintain security. There are polygraphers in the Statutory Intelligence Services and both the Public and the Private Sector make use of polygraphers for, among other things, employment and security screening, and as part of investigations into financial loss and sexual harassment. Polygraphers are required to testify in a number of dispute resolution bodies including the Council for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA), the Labour Court and in District and Regional Courts in respect of bail applications and confessions during polygraphy examinations.

    There are very few trained Black polygraphers in South Africa and this Qualification will provide access to the industry to people who are able to conduct polygraph examinations in the various official languages without the use of interpreters. Correctional Services will, in the near future, use polygraph examinations in association with correctional release conditions. This has implications for the number of new polygraphers that will be needed across the provinces. South African Polygraph examiners often work in other countries in Africa and there is a growing need in the South African Development Community (SADC) for well trained polygraphers.

    The National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 is essential for the regulation of training in an industry that is based on ethical principles and where there is currently no legislation or other form of governance. At present there are short courses for polygraphers, but no Qualification. The National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 is a first step towards accredited training and future governance of the industry. Representatives of both the Polygraphy Association of South Africa and the South African Professional Polygraphy Association have indicated that once there is a Qualification registered on the NQF they intend approaching the relevant Minister with a view to regulating the profession.

    The learning pathway for learners in Polygraphy:

    It is anticipated that learners who wish to become polygraphers will have a first degree preferably with psychology, physiology, forensic science or criminology as a subject. The National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 will provide the occupational competencies required to operate in the industry.

    There are two routes for learners who wish to qualify as polygraphers:
  • An academic route where the learner first achieves an academic qualification or first degree from a Higher Education Institution and then completes an occupational qualification to gain the competencies necessary to practise as a polygrapher. This route would be be:
    > B degree in Criminology, Forensic Science, Physiology, Human Resources, Psychology or Law.
    > National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5.
    > National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 6.
  • An interim occupational route where a learner with a senior certificate or NQF Level 4 equivalent, acquires an occupational qualification at NQF Level 5 that allows access to the industry and then proceeds to a proposed occupational qualification at Level 6 or a B degree (subject to the admission requirements of the Higher Institution). This route would be:
  • Grade 12 equivalent/Further Education and Training certificate/Senior Certificate.
  • National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5.
  • National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 6.
  • B degree in Criminology, Forensic Science, Physiology, Human Resources, Psychology or Law. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    It is assumed that learners are competent in Communication and Mathematical Literacy, NQF Level 4.

    Recognition of Prior Learning:
  • Provision has been made for prior learning to be recognised if a learner is able to demonstrate competence in the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes implicit in this Qualification. Application for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) should be made to a relevant accredited ETQA.
  • Credit towards a Unit Standard is subject to quality assurance by a relevant accredited ETQA and is conducted by a workplace assessor.
  • This Qualification can be obtained in part or in whole through Recognition of Prior Learning.
  • RPL will be done using a range of assessment tools and techniques that have been jointly decided upon by the learner and the assessor.
  • The same principles that apply to assessment of the Qualification and its associated Unit Standards apply to RPL.

    Access to the Qualification:
  • There is open access to this Qualification for any learner in possession of an FETC or equivalent qualification. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    A minimum of 120 credits are required to complete the Qualification which is made up of the following components:
  • Fundamental: 19 credits.
  • Core: 70 credits.
  • Electives: 31 credits.
    Total: 120 credits.

    Fundamental Component:

    There are nineteen credits designated as fundamental for the purpose of this qualification. These address communication skills and study skills as a means of scaffolding learning for the research required and understanding of democracy and investigative interviewing that are fundamental to the learning required for this qualification.

    All the Unit Standards designated as Fundamental are compulsory.

    Core Component:

    Seventy credits have been allocated to Unit Standards designated as Core for the purpose of this Qualification, which ensures that the qualification has a strong polygraphy focus. These Unit Standards provide the knowledge, competencies and skills related to polygraph examinations as well as knowledge and understanding of human behaviour, physiology, knowledge of the industry in both the South African and international contexts and issues of ethics and legislation necessary for people who conduct polygraph examinations to detect deception.

    All the Unit Standards indicated as Core are compulsory.

    Elective Component:

    Electives that add up to at least thirty one credits should be selected from the Unit Standards listed as electives or from other qualifications if they relate directly to the learner's work context. The Electives provide opportunities for the holistic development of the learner provide for maximum flexibility and multi-skilling and allow learners to achieve a qualification that is relevant to the context in which they work:
  • Two Unit Standards at Level 6 have been included that address quality assurance and the use of polygraphs for correctional release and monitoring.
  • Unit Standards from Victim Empowerment are included as Electives as Polygraphers frequently assist in investigations involving violence against women and children.
  • There is a Unit Standard on xenophobia as polygraphers are involved with cases relating to illegal immigration and xenophobia in the workplace.
  • Three Unit Standards in the list of possible Electives relate to the emotional intelligence, interactive style and stress management and should contribute to the personal development of learners who work with people on a daily basis is often stressful situations.
  • There are five Unit Standards that relate to management as a number of Polygraph Examiners run their own business and require management competencies.
  • One Unit Standard on recruitment will be useful for polygraphers who screen individuals for employment purposes.
  • There is a Unit Standard on anti-corruption as fighting corruption is a priority for the South African Government. Many polygraphers are employed in Government Service and will be required to receive training in the Minimum Anti-Corruption Capacity which will be established in all national and provincial departments and organisational components to prevent and combat corruption in their spheres of operation.
  • A Unit Standard on mainstreaming of gender has been included for employees in Government Services as mainstreaming gender for women's empowerment is a Government priority in the Public Service where there will be systemic integration of gender considerations into all aspects of public service delivery. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    The Exit Level Outcomes and their Associated Assessment Criteria are the following, which means that the learner will be able to:

    1. Apply a polygraph examination process.

    2. Substantiate a specialist opinion as to whether or not an individual displays an indication of deception.

    3. Demonstrate knowledge and application of ethical conduct in the polygraph examination process.

    4. Collect interpret, analyse, synthesise, evaluate and present information related to a polygraph examination.

    5. Communicate effectively in a polygraph examination context.

    The Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:
  • The learner is able to identify and solve problems in which responses show that responsible decisions using critical and creative thinking have been made in analysing the facts, determining the critical elements of information and compiling test questions.
  • The learner is able to work effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organisation or community in that polygraph examination may be part of a larger investigation and polygraph examiners interact with Human Resource Practitioners and Unions and may be required to assist in situations of conflict.
  • The learner is able to organise and manage him/herself and his/her activities responsibly and effectively by conducting a polygraph examination efficiently and giving feedback to all the relevant stakeholders timeously.
  • The learner is able to collect, organise and critically evaluate information in researching information relating to the detection of deception, gathering information to develop questions and selecting an appropriate test format.
  • The learner is able to communicate effectively using visual, mathematics and language skills in the modes of oral and/or written presentations in communicating the results of his/her own research, communicating with clients, subjects and representatives of Unions and giving evidence as an expert witness.
  • The learner is able to use science and technology effectively and critically showing responsibility towards the environment and the health of others in using polygraph instruments to conduct polygraph examinations and in using the Internet for research purposes.
  • The learner is able to demonstrate an understanding of the world as a set of related systems by recognising that problem-solving contexts do not exist in isolation in understanding the relationship between detection of deception and human physiology and behaviour.
  • The learner is able to reflect on and explore a variety of strategies to learn more effectively in demonstrating application of efficient study skills.
  • The learner is able to participate as a responsible citizen in the life of local, national and global communities in assisting with investigations and uncovering deception thereby protecting the right of individuals to truth and protecting economic activity and assisting in the maintenance of security.
  • The learner is able to demonstrate cultural sensitivity in conducting polygraph examinations with due regard for aspects of diversity and in using the services of an interpreter where appropriate.

    Before The National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 is awarded, learners are required to demonstrate competence in the required Unit Standards and complete a summative assessment based on the Exit Outcomes of the Qualification.

    Experienced polygraphers could request Recognition of Prior Learning against the Exit Level Outcomes of the Qualification and could achieve the Qualification by completing a summative assessment based on the Exit Outcomes. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:
  • The polygraph examination meets international standards of good practice.
  • A decision is made to proceed with an examination based on analysis of the case facts and accurate identification of the problem.
  • The suitability of a subject is assessed based on basic knowledge of human physiology and behaviour and expert opinion is sought if necessary.
  • Techniques and methodology of polygraph examination are used effectively to achieve a valid result option.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:
  • Polygrams are interpreted to inform a specialist opinion.
  • An opinion is expressed and substantiated based on the interpretation of the polygraph tracings.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:
  • International good practice is contextualised for an African environment and applied to provide an ethical service.
  • Knowledge of democracy, human rights and ethics is applied to a polygraph process.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:
  • Efficient study skills are applied to collect and synthesise information from a variety of sources.
  • Developments in the field are researched to inform or improve current practice.
  • Knowledge of the polygraph environment is applied to operate as an informed polygraph examiner.
  • Issues relating to detection of deception are discussed and an informed opinion is expressed that contributes to the current debate.
  • Sources are acknowledge with due regard for intellectual property rights and copyright.
  • Knowledge of investigative interviewing is applied to the polygraph process.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 5:
  • Information from research is presented using the conventions of polygraph examination and without resorting to plagiarism.
  • Verbal and written feedback to clients and examinees is coherent, reliable and accurate.

    Integrated Assessment:

    Assessment practices must be fair, transparent, valid and reliable and should ensure that no learner is disadvantaged. Learners who wish to be assessed against the competencies in the Qualification and/or associated Unit Standards should direct enquiries to the relevant ETQA.

    The focus of assessment must be on the assessment of the learning outcomes rather than learning outputs. The Specific Outcomes guide the learning and training process towards the outcomes on a continuous basis. The purpose is to determine whether the outcomes have been attained. Situations should present a wide range of options. Applications should require significant choices from a wide range of procedures and in a number of contexts.

    Learning, teaching and assessment are inextricably linked. Where appropriate, assessment of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values indicated in the various Unit Standards should be integrated.

    Assessment has a formative monitoring function. Formative assessment should be used to assess gaps in the learners' skill and knowledge and to indicate where there is a need for expanded opportunities. The goal is to promote learning and to assess the efficacy of the teaching and learning process. Feedback from assessment informs teaching and learning and allows for the critique of outcomes, methodology and materials. Formative assessment is diagnostic and as such it should guide the learner and the trainer. It is continuous and is used to plan appropriate learning experiences to meet the learner's needs. It provides information about problems experienced at different stages in the learning process. As it is criterion referenced, if the learner has met the assessment criteria, he/she has achieved the outcomes.

    Assessment should also have a summative component. Summative assessment may be used on completion of a Unit Standard, but should not be the only form of assessment.

    Assessment should take place in an authentic context as far as is possible. A variety of methods must be used in assessment and tools and activities must be appropriate to the context in which the learner is working. Where it is not possible to assess competence in the workplace, simulations, case studies and other similar techniques should be used to provide a context appropriate to the assessment.

    Integration implies that theoretical and practical components should, where possible, be assessed together. Integrative techniques should be used to assess applied competence. Learners should be required to demonstrate that they can perform the outcomes with understanding and insight.

    Assessment should ensure that all Specific Outcomes, embedded knowledge and Critical Cross-Field Outcomes are evaluated. Assessment of the Critical Cross-Field Outcomes should be integrated with the assessment of the Specific Outcomes. The Critical Cross-Field Outcomes are implicit in some Unit Standards and programmes should be designed to extend and further reflect the integration. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    The USA and Israel are regarded as leaders in the field for training of Polygraph professionals. Numerous polygraph schools and associations exist internationally with one common accreditation requirement: that is to be accredited through the American Polygraph Association (APA). Most of these sites do not list the standards for qualifying polygraph examiners.

    The qualification authorities of the UK, New Zealand and Australia were also researched but no standards were found. The report that follows indicates all the sites researched, the associations contacted, feedback received as well as course overviews. In some cases Curricula were sourced that facilitated this comparison.

    Notes: Americanized spelling is used where material is quoted from American sources].

    International Standard:

    The current international standard is a ten-week course presented under the auspices of the American Polygraph Association. Standards of practice are set by the American Standards for Materials and Techniques (ASTM). This is the leading professional body internationally. The Department of Defence in the USA has a 14 week polygraph course followed by a three-month internship to train Federal Government Polygraphers. Polygraph examinations are conducted in at least 69 countries.

    American Polygraph Association (APA):

    Established in 1966, the American Polygraph Association (APA) consists of over 2500 members dedicated to providing a valid and reliable means to verify the truth and establish the highest standards of moral, ethical, and professional conduct in the polygraph field. The American Polygraph Association is the leading polygraph professional association, establishing standards of ethical practices, techniques, instrumentation, research, and advanced training and continuing educational programs.

    Mr. Donald Krapohl, President of the American Polygraph Association responded very favourably to the proposed South African Polygraphy Qualification as follows, "I congratulate you for the excellent drafts of polygraph instruction standards you sent. They are thorough and well conceived. I have made a few minor edits and suggestions to the drafts, which are attached to this e-mail".

    He also verified that the current international standard is a ten-week course presented under the auspices of the American Polygraph Association.

    Standards of practice are set by the American Standards for Materials and Techniques (ASTM). The Department of Defence in the United States of America (USA) has a 14-week polygraph course to train Federal Government Polygraphers, followed by a three-month internship. Polygraph examinations are conducted in at least 69 countries.

    The following comparison is based on courses accredited through the American Polygraph Association (APA) as these appear to represent the APA standards:

    International Associations:
  • Global Association of Security and Polygraph:

    The Global Association of Security and Polygraph is an International Association and is the world's largest Security Association for Security Service Professionals/Organizations, Private investigators/Agencies, Polygraph examiners & all other Professionals providing services or products in the field of Civilian Security & loss prevention. It was formed to inter-alia:
  • To promote and maintain the highest ethical practices & professional skills in the profession of Security Service, Private investigations, Polygraph, Fraud & Loss prevention.
  • To further and establish a mutual feeling of professionalism, trust, goodwill and friendship among Security/Investigation/Polygraph agencies throughout the world.
  • The International League of Polygraph Examiners (ILPE):

    This organisation based in Kyiv, Ukraine, is a voluntary professional polygraph association composed of highly qualified polygraph examiners in the private, law enforcement and government sectors from around the world, determined to protect the public by verifying the truth. Working at the international level, the ILPE is dedicated to providing a valid and reliable means of verifying the truth, and advancing and defending lie detection as a scientific discipline and profession serving the public good. The ILPE assures the highest level of professionalism among polygraph examiners by establishing standards of ethical practices, techniques and instrumentation, as well as providing polygraph school accreditation and continuing polygraph education. The ILPE is committed to educating the public about the positive impact and benefits of the polygraph.

    In order to become an ILPE member, a polygraph examiner must graduate from an ILPE and/or an APA (American Polygraph Association) accredited polygraph school, and utilise ILPE and/or APA approved polygraph instrumentation meeting strict international quality standards. The ILPE governs the conduct of its members by requiring adherence to the ILPE Code of Ethics and a set of ILPE Standards of Practice.
  • Academy for Scientific Investigative Training (USA and Egypt):

    A.S.I.T. is accredited by American Polygraph Association (APA) and the American Association of Police Polygraphists (AAPP). Since 1980 The Academy for Scientific Investigative Training has educated law enforcement, government, security and private sector personnel from around the world in best practice polygraph, interview and interrogation techniques. Directed by two forensic experts known across the globe for their best-selling reference, Effective Interviewing & Interrogation Techniques, the Academy offers three levels of polygraph instruction.
  • Basic Polygraph, a ten-week program, includes two weeks of post-graduate assignment. Students learn analogue and digital instrumentation and all polygraph techniques including Peak o Tension, Keeler, Reid, Arther, Backster, Department of Defense.
  • Matte and A.S.I.T.'s proprietary Integrated Zone Comparison Technique. Chart interpretation and numerical scoring methods are also presented, including A.S.I.T.'s Horizontal Scoring System and its Algorithm for Manual Scoring.
  • Hands-on training in the Academy's new scoring software, A.S.I.T. PolySuite, an examiner-powered algorithm for both analogue and computerized polygraph systems is also included.

    For certified polygraph examiners, A.S.I.T. offers advanced training and continuing education that meets American Polygraph Association requirements for certification.

    United Kingdom and Europe:
  • The British Polygraph Association (BPA):

    This is the largest organisation of its type in Britain and the European Union. BPA governs the conduct of its members by requiring adherence to a Code of Ethics and a set of Standards and Principles of Practice. In order to become a BPA member, examiners must adhere to strict guidelines and educational requirements that include hundreds of hours of coursework at an accredited school, as well as an internship. BPA members must acquire continuing education and training in order to maintain membership. All members of the British Polygraph Association have graduated from a training organisation accredited by the American Polygraph Association. This ensures:
  • The examiner has been trained to the highest standard.
  • The examiner is using the latest polygraph techniques.
  • The polygraph test will be conducted in a professional manner.
  • Respect to privacy is paramount.
  • The polygraph examiner is committed to continuing education within the field of polygraph testing.

    Australasia:
  • The National Training Information Service (NTIS):

    The NTIS provides a search and browse function that allows one to find specific registered Australian Training Packages, Qualifications, Courses, Units of Competency and Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) that are licensed to provide training in one or many The Australian and New Zealand Forensic Science Society Inc. The Australian Forensic Science Society was formed in 1971 with the aim of bringing together scientists, police, criminalists, pathologists, and members of the legal profession actively involved with the forensic sciences. The Society's objectives are to enhance the quality of Forensic Science providing both formal and informal lectures, discussions and demonstrations encompassing the various disciplines within the science. It was decided in 1988 that the Australian Forensic Society should recognise its New Zealand members and changed its name to the Australian and New Zealand Forensic Science Society (ANZFSS).
  • The New Zealand Qualifications Authority's (NZQA):

    Its primary function is to coordinate the administration and quality assurance of national qualifications in New Zealand. The New Zealand Framework had various sub-fields under the domain law and security but no qualifications or standards could be assessed relating to polygraphy.
  • APS Training Australia:

    APS training is based in Melbourne, Australia and specialises in conducting in-house training programs for corporate clients throughout the world. The behavioural interviewing courses offered by APS Training are designed to provide attendees with dynamic and effective interviewing skills that get results. Conducting effective interviews is a critical process in weeding out those people that may have fabricated, embellished or omitted information.

    The training is directed at anyone involved in managing people, recruitment, government authorities, financial reporting services at all levels, investigators, customs, police workplace relations, human resource personnel, legal firms, banks, executives, auditors, risk management, fund managers, organisations large and small. This training is not aimed at polygraphers and no schools exist in Australia for the training of polygraphers who go to the USA for training.

    Israel:
  • The Horowitz Institute:

    The Institute is one of the largest private polygraph institutes in the world, administering thousands of polygraph tests per year to public and civil sectors. The Horowitz Institute has worked in Western Europe, Russia, Latin America and South Africa.
  • Reason for the Selection of Countries for Comparison:

    Most courses and organisations sourced align with the American Polygraph association (APA) Standards, and are accredited through this body. All the courses sourced indicate their course outcomes are APA accredited which provides some idea of the international standard for this comparison. Whilst their course brochures are not detailed enough for a full comparison every effort has been made to check for synergies and gaps in the proposed South African National Certificate in Polygraphy, NQF Level 5. Course selected for comparison are:
  • The Academy for Scientific Investigative Training (USA and Egypt) A.S.I.T
  • The Arizona School of Polygraph Science.

    Detailed Comparison:

    Academy for Scientific Investigative Training (ASIT) (USA Based With an Office in Egypt):

    Forensic Psychophysiology Course Outline (Eight Classroom Weeks 320 Hours/Post Graduate Work 80 Hours):

    Note: Only generalised conclusions can be made about the outcomes of the Academy for Scientific Investigative Training workshop (indicated in bold font) as these are not formulated as outcomes in the way that South Africa records specific outcomes. The course is a 400-hour course with 44 hours of practical work at the end of the theoretical section.
  • History and Development: Eight hours. The History of lie detection is traced from primitive man to its evolved state of art and will be presented to the student in an interesting and informative manner.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • The Unit Standard, Research the origins and use of polygraphy, covers the history of lie detection and contextualises this for the South African situation.
  • Psychophysiology: Forty-four hours. Students study the interrelationship between the mind and body, through an in-depth examination of the effects of emotions on the nervous system, and the subsequent changes in body organs and systems. These changes are what Forensic Psycho-physiologists monitor and record for interpretation of truth or deception.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • The Unit Standards, Apply knowledge of anatomy and physiology to polygraph testing and Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of human behaviour that has implications for polygraph examinations, cover the interrelationship between the mind and body and the effects of emotions on the nervous system, and the subsequent changes in body organs and systems that polygraphers monitor and record to detect deception.
  • Instrumentation: Twenty-six hours. Students are instructed in the complete nature of both state of the art and the more traditional instrumentation used in the detection of deception, including their construction, operation, calibration, and maintenance. Both mechanical and electronic polygraph instruments are covered.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • The Unit Standard, Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy examinations, requires learners to compare Polygraph instruments in terms of cost, ease of use and software and to operate and maintain polygraph instruments, adjusting settings on software, conduct maintenance of sensors and trouble shoot common problems.
  • Techniques: Sixty hours. This includes a comprehensive study of the various forensic psycho-physiological techniques in use today, including Keeler, Reid, Arther, Backster, Department of Defence, Marcy, Positive Control, Peak of Tension, and the Academy's Integrated Zone of Comparison Technique. The student acquires a working knowledge of each of major polygraph techniques and is capable of using any of them in the field for both law enforcement and commercial purposes.

    Comparison with South African Qualification: The Unit Standard, Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy testing, has the Specific Outcomes:
  • Explain the phases in the polygraph process.
  • Discuss different interview techniques used in polygraph examinations.
  • Construct questions used in polygraph examinations.
  • Investigate the use of different test formats.
  • Interpret polygrams.
  • Discuss the use of interpreters in polygraph examinations.

    Learners who are competent in this Unit Standard would be competent in the polygraph process at a greater depth and breadth required in the ASIT training and up to date on any of the newest techniques selected by the provider. Some of the interviewing techniques indicated in the ASIT course such as Reid, Arther, Marcy and Positive Control are no longer used in South Africa. The earlier techniques are included in the Unit Standard Research the origins and use of polygraphy.
  • Interviewing: Forty hours. The student is taught to properly prepare an examinee for a forensic psychophysiological examination, along with various methods of ascertaining critical information from the individual. The student will learn to analyze Nonverbal Behaviour and Unwitting Verbal Cues, with the latest advances in this field, such as, the Morgan Interview Thematic Technique, and Scientific Content Analysis. Students will be instructed in the Integrated Interrogation Technique, which will allow them to masterfully obtain confessions from deceptive examinees in a non-intrusive system.

    Comparison with South African Qualification: Interviewing is thoroughly covered in the South African Unit Standards:
  • Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy testing, specifically in the outcomes:
    > Specific Outcome 2: Discuss different interview techniques used in polygraph testing.
    > Specific Outcome 3: Construct questions for use in polygraph testing.
    > Specific Outcome 4: Investigate the use of different test formats.
  • Conduct a polygraph examination, specifically in the outcome.
    > Specific Outcome 2: Interview an examinee or suspect.
  • Analyse the facts and context of an incident in order to make a decision relating to polygraph.
  • Conduct an Investigative Interview.
  • Question Formulation: Thirty hours. This area of instruction covers one of the most vital phases of lie detection, the selection of the correct issue and formulation of questions which reflect both the needs of the examiner and the concepts of the examinee. Students will be trained to artfully develop polygraph questions.

    Comparison with South African Qualification:

    Formulating questions is thoroughly covered in the South African Unit Standards:
  • Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy testing, specifically in Specific Outcome 3: Develop questions for a polygraph format.
  • Conduct a polygraph examination, Specific Outcome 3: Develop questions for a specific polygraph test format.
  • Chart Interpretation: Fifty hours. Chart analysis is the final and most crucial part of any polygraph examination. This phase of study teaches the student how to understand the physiological phenomena recorded by the instrument, to make the proper and necessary comparisons, and to reach an accurate conclusion of truth or deception. The development of numerical evaluation is taught from its origin with the Backster technique to the latest advancement with the Academy's own Horizontal Scoring System.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • The Unit Standards, Quality assure a polygraph process and Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy testing specifically Specific Outcome 5: Interpret polygrams deal with chart analysis in detail.
  • Legal and Ethical Aspects: Fourteen hours. Ethical conduct by the forensic psychophysiologist is essential. A code of conduct prescribed by the American Polygraph Association is presented and discussed. Students are informed of the latest available legal opinions from the courts concerning lie detection and its application. The student is instructed in proper methods of testifying as an expert witness in civil and criminal court proceedings, and administrative hearings.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • Legal and ethical aspects are integrated into the Unit Standards, Research ethical and international trends in polygraphy and Research the origins and use of polygraphy, where they are contextualised for South Africa. Ethical aspects are based on the South African Constitution and issues relating to translation are included to reflect the realities of the South African demographics. The Unit Standard, Demonstrate insight into democracy as a form of governance and its implications for a diverse society is included to allow discussion on different forms of democracy and comparison with the American system and by implication polygraph examination in the two countries.
  • Forensic Psychophysiology Research and Methods: Four hours. The basis of any scientific technique requires that it be valid and reliable. Students are familiarized with current research regarding the validity and reliability of the forensic psychophysiological technique. Students are also acquainted with published scientific research data and journals, and ascertain a basic understanding of scientific experimental design.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • The Unit Standards:
    > Research ethical and international trends in polygraphy.
    > Research the origins and use of polygraphy.
    > Quality assure a polygraph process.
  • Introduce current research trends in from published scientific research data and journals.
  • Practicum: Forty-four hours. Students participate in, and observe, examinations in the Academy's modern polygraph laboratory. The student is presented with hypothetical case facts and be required to construct and administer a complete polygraph examination to resolve the issue in a mock crime paradigm. This practical experience allows the students to practice everything that they have been taught. This practice has been the most effective method in training examiners to be able to properly administer forensic psychophysiological examination in the field.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • The South African Unit Standards include Assessment Criteria that allow for naturally occurring workplace evidence. Laboratory activities are not available in South Africa and the National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 integrates on the job experience and academic knowledge. The following Unit Standards specifically require authentic practical work:
    > Quality Assure a polygraph process.
    > Conduct a polygraph examination.
    > Analyse the facts and context of an incident in order to make a decision relating to polygraph examinations.
  • In addition the Exit Outcomes focus on practical application of theory:
    > Apply a polygraph examination process.
    > Substantiate a specialist opinion as to whether or not an individual displays an indication of deception.
    > Demonstrate knowledge and application of ethical conduct in the polygraph examination process.
    > Collect interpret, analyse, synthesise, evaluate and present information related to a polygraph examination.
    > Communicate effectively in a polygraph examination context.
  • Post Graduate Assignment: Eighty hours. After the course graduates are required to postulate and complete a post graduate research project approved by the Director. Each student has individualized conferences with the Director and his staff to assist in choosing an appropriate project.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • There are two fundamental Unit Standards in the South African Qualification that are intended to scaffold learning and ensure that learners have the competencies necessary to conduct their own research. These are:
    > Demonstrate knowledge and application of efficient study skills.
    > Present an informed argument on a current issue in a business sector.
  • Two Unit Standards require learners to complete research projects:
    > Research ethical and international trends in polygraphy.
    > Research the origins and use of polygraphy.

    Overall comparison with the ASIT training:

    Learners who are competent in the National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 will be competent in the polygraph process and related knowledge, skills and competencies at a greater depth and breadth than is required in the ASIT training. They will have been exposed to attitudes and values aligned to the South African Constitution and an African context and will be aware of issues of diversity that influence polygraph examinations.

    The ASIT course is a 400-hour course with 44 hours of practical work at the end of the theoretical section. The South African Qualification requires 1200 hours of notional time that integrates theory and practice. It appears that the South African Qualification covers all aspects included in the ASIT training and has the advantage of being contextualised for an African situation. The major differences relate to the application of outcomes based education and integration of theory and practice.
  • Arizona School of Polygraph Science:

    This Polygraph Examiner's Course consists of up to 394 hours of intensive classroom and laboratory study. The course is designed to insure the graduate will be a competent polygraph examiner, equipped with the knowledge necessary to conduct conclusive polygraph examinations in a professional and ethical manner. The major subjects taught are as follows:

    Notes: The main topics of Training Curriculum for the Arizona School of Polygraph Science are indicated in bold font. The outline is in insufficient detail to allow for a full comparison to the specific outcomes only generalised conclusions can be made.
  • History of Polygraph: 8 class hours. A complete history is presented of the origin and development of the science of detection of deception, including various methods and techniques of the past and present. The history of polygraph schools, scientific research done and how it became related to the profession; as well as the many people who contributed to the advance of polygraph as we know it today.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • The Unit Standard, Research the origins and use of polygraphy, covers the history of lie detection and contextualises this for the South African situation.
  • Mechanics of Instrument Operation: 20 class hours. This is a comprehensive study of the instruments used in polygraph, how each component works and the functions each of the components perform. This includes how the polygraph chart is produced and the professional and ethical marking of the chart that is universally accepted.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • The Unit Standard, Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy examinations, requires learners to compare Polygraph instruments in terms of cost, ease of use and software and to operate and maintain polygraph instruments, adjusting settings on software, conduct maintenance of sensors and trouble shoot common problems. It includes the production of a polygram according to international standards.
  • Test Question Construction: 52 class hours Instructions and practical exercises on the theory, selection, preparation, and phrasing of the various types of questions used in polygraph.

    Comparison with South African Qualification:
  • Formulating questions and test construction is thoroughly covered in the South African Unit Standards:
    > Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy testing, specifically in Specific Outcome 3: Develop questions for a polygraph format.
    > Conduct a polygraph examination, Specific Outcome 3: Develop questions for a specific polygraph test format.
  • Polygraph Techniques: 85 class hours. A complete explanation of the nature, purpose, structure and sequence of the various types of polygraph tests administered during polygraph examinations: This includes the Zone Techniques, the MGQT Technique and the Relevant/Irrelevant Technique. A comprehensive study of the psychology and methodology of administering a pre-employment polygraph examination, the technique used, and how to construct and ask questions used in this type of examination for Federally-exempted positions.

    Comparison with South African Qualification:
  • The Unit Standard, Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy testing, has the Specific Outcomes:
    > Explain the phases in the polygraph process.
    > Discuss different interview techniques used in polygraph examinations.
    > Construct questions used in polygraph examinations.
    > Investigate the use of different test formats.
    > Interpret polygrams.
    > Discuss the use of interpreters in polygraph examinations.
  • Learners who are competent in this Unit Standard would be competent in the polygraph process at a greater depth and breadth required in the Arizona training. All techniques are included in the Unit Standards:
    > Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy testing with specific reference to Specific outcomes:
    > Conduct a polygraph examination.
  • Chart Analysis: 50 class hours. Comprehensive and detailed explanation of the theory of polygraph chart interpretations; methods of comparing the graphic indices of truth and deception; determinant factors that affect polygraph response and steps involved in rendering an accurate opinion of truth or deception. There are practical exercises in chart interpretation conducted in class. Hands-on with Computer Analysis of the Charts. This highly technical program enhances complements and supplements the examiner's opinion.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • The Unit Standards, Quality assure a polygraph process and Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy testing specifically Specific Outcome 5: Interpret polygrams, deal with chart analysis in detail.
  • Instrument Maintenance & Calibration: 8 class hours. Proper maintenance of the polygraph instrument, trouble-shooting methodology and simple field repair is taught along with calibration of the instrument and proper documentation.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • The Unit Standard, Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy examinations, requires learners to compare Polygraph instruments in terms of cost, ease of use and software and to operate and maintain polygraph instruments, adjusting settings on software, conduct maintenance of sensors and trouble shoot common problems.
  • Polygraph Research: 4 class hours. Students will be given the latest in research, showing the validity and reliability of polygraph techniques.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • There are two fundamental Unit Standards in the South African Qualification that are intended to scaffold learning and ensure that learners have the competencies necessary to conduct their own research. These are:
    > Demonstrate knowledge and application of efficient study skills
    > Present an informed argument on a current issue in a business sector.
  • Two Unit Standards require learners to complete research projects:
    > Research ethical and international trends in polygraphy.
    > Research the origins and use of polygraphy.
  • Interviewing Procedures: 32 class hours. This includes intensive study of pre-test interviewing and post-test interrogation to give the examiner the skills needed for obtaining admissions and/or confessions from a subject found deceptive when examined by means of the polygraph.

    Comparison with South African Qualification:

    Interviewing, including pre and post-test interviewing is thoroughly covered in the South African Unit Standards:
  • Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy testing, specifically in the outcomes:
    > Specific Outcome 2: Discuss different interview techniques used in polygraph testing.
    > Specific Outcome 3: Construct questions for use in polygraph testing.
    > Specific Outcome 4: Investigate the use of different test formats.
  • Conduct a polygraph examination, specifically in the outcome.
    > Specific Outcome 2: Interview an examinee or suspect.
  • Analyse the facts and context of an incident in order to make a decision relating to polygraph.
  • Conduct an Investigative Interview.
  • Ethics: 6 class hours Information on the ethical and moral standards required of every professional polygraph examiner, regarding the examiner, examinee, the chart and other interested parties. The use of confidentiality and ethics of submitted oral and written reports.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • Ethical aspects are integrated into the Unit Standards, Research ethical and international trends in polygraphy and Research the origins and use of polygraphy, where they are contextualised for South Africa. Ethical aspects are based on the South African Constitution and issues relating to translation are included to reflect the realities of the South African demographics. The Unit Standard, Demonstrate insight into democracy as a form of governance and its implications for a diverse society is included to allow discussion on different forms of democracy and comparison with the American system and by implication polygraph examination in the two countries. The Unit Standards include issues of consent and confidentiality and oral and written reports.
  • Polygraph Skills: 48 class hours This is hands-on training in the use of the polygraph instrument. Both analog and computerized instruments are utilized. Students will be supervised and critiqued by staff examiners. Simulated and realistic situations will be utilized in professionally equipped polygraph examination rooms.

    Comparison with South African Qualification:

    The Unit Standard demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy testing, includes all the skills, including the use of instruments that a polygraph examiner needs to know. These are reinforced in the Unit Standard, Conduct a polygraph examination, which deals with the practical application of the skills.

    Learners who are competent in the two Unit Standard would be competent in polygraph skills at a greater depth and breadth required in the Arizona training.
  • Legal Issues: 8 class hours. Basic legal matters pertaining to criminal and civil polygraph testing will be given by a qualified guest instructor who knows and understands polygraph and the legal issues involved.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • Legal aspects are integrated into the Unit Standards, Research ethical and international trends in polygraphy and Research the origins and use of polygraphy, where they are contextualised for South Africa.
  • Psychological & Physiological: 48 class hours Lectures in general physiology with specialized instruction in the respiratory, electrodermal, cardiovascular, muscular and nervous systems of the human body as they relate to the reactions and responses recorded by the polygraph instrument. This includes education in general psychology with emphasis on human behavior and how different personality disorders may affect the outcome of a polygraph examination.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • The Unit Standards apply knowledge of anatomy and physiology to polygraph testing and Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of human behaviour that has implications for polygraph examinations, cover the interrelationship between the mind and body, the effects of emotions on the nervous system and the subsequent changes in body organs and systems that polygraphers monitor and record to detect deception. All aspects covered in the Arizona course are included in the two Unit Standards.
  • Reviews and Examination: 25 class hours. This time is set aside for introductions at the beginning of the course and for the polygraph examinations of students. This is also the time for reviewing material previously presented to students, for course examinations and student performance evaluations.

    Synergies with South African Qualification:
  • Before the National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 is awarded, learners are required to demonstrate competence in the required Unit Standards and complete a summative assessment based on the Exit Outcomes of the Qualification.

    Overall comparison with the Arizona training:

    Learners who are competent in the National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 will be competent in the polygraph process and related knowledge, skills and competencies at a greater depth and breadth required in the Arizona training. They will have been exposed to attitudes and values aligned to the South African Constitution and an African context and will be aware of issues of diversity that influence polygraph examinations.

    The Arizona course consists of up to 394 hours of intensive classroom and laboratory study. The South African Qualification requires 1200 hours of notional time that integrates theory and practice. It appears that the South African Qualification covers all aspects included in the Arizona training and has the advantage of being contextualised for an African situation. The major difference relate to the application of outcomes based education, integration of theory and practice and the fact that the Arizona course is designed to insure the graduate will be a competent polygraph examiner, equipped with the knowledge necessary to conduct conclusive polygraph examinations in a professional and ethical manner, while the National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 is an occupational access qualification.

    The Arizona course is offered in South Africa where learners are required to have a School-Leaving Certificate and the requirements for a Degree are waived. The course teaches a different scoring system, but all aspects of the course are covered in the South African Qualification in greater depth, structure and detail. The South African Qualification also places greater emphasis on research.

    Conclusions:
  • It appears that the outcomes of the Academy for Scientific Investigative Training, the Arizona School of Polygraph Science and the proposed National Certificate: Polygraphy, NQF Level 5 is closely matched. The entry level requirements of the American Associations include a college education e.g. Entry level requirements (Academy for Scientific Investigative Training):
    > At least an associate's degree from an accredited college or university, or written confirmation of qualifications in the State in which the applicant intends to practice, unless a higher level degree is required for licensing in the State in which the applicant intends to practice, in which case the State law shall prevail.
    > An applicable level of education required by the State and/or country in which the applicant intends to practice and at least two years investigative experience confirmed in writing by the supervisor of the applicant, unless a greater amount of investigative experience is required in the State in which the applicant intends to practice, in which case the greater amount shall prevail; and, all of the following:
    > Good moral character, documented by professional references.
    > At least 25 years of age (waiver on case by case basis), unless a State licensing law requires a higher minimum age, in which case the higher age will apply.
    > A sponsor who is funding the tuition and expenses.
  • The outcomes of the proposed South African Qualification are well aligned to the American Polygraph Association (APA) as the international standard. The South African Qualification has greater depth and breath and has received positive feedback from its president, Mr. Donald Krapohl.
  • The task team is well connected internationally, and can confirm that there is no a full year (120 credit equivalent) polygraphy qualification internationally and that as a holistic programme this appears to be the qualification first of a kind internationally. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    The National Certificate: Poligraphy, NQF Level 5 articulates horizontally with the following qualifications:
  • ID 20496: National Certificate: Policing, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 48865: National Diploma: Policing, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 49118: National Certificate: Resolving of Crime, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 58183: National Diploma: Forensic Pathology Support, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 57651: National Certificate: Forensic Science, NQF Level 5.

    This qualification articulates vertically with the following qualifications:
  • Bachelor Degrees, NQF Level 6: (subject to the admission requirements of the Higher Institution) in:
    > Criminology.
    > Forensic Science.
    > Physiology.
    > Penology.
    > Police Science.
    > Security Risk Management.
    > Forensic Investigation.
    > Human Resources.
    > Psychology.
    > Law.
  • ID 50194 Bachelor: Policing Practices, NQF Level 6.
  • Bachelor of Arts: Police Science, NQF Level 6.
  • Bachelor of Police, NQF Level 6.
  • Bachelor of Technology: Policing, NQF Level 7.
  • Bachelor of Technology: Forensic Investigation, NQF Level 7. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
    This Qualification will be internally assessed and externally moderated by a moderator registered by a relevant accredited ETQA or an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant accredited ETQA.
  • Moderators, competent at the level of the Qualification, are registered by a relevant accredited ETQA to ensure that the standard across assessors is consistent.
  • Moderators must be registered as assessors with the relevant ETQA.
  • Moderators are required to report to a relevant accredited ETQA.
  • A relevant accredited ETQA will monitor and quality assures moderation and assessment according to guidelines in the Qualification. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
  • Assessors must be registered as assessors with a relevant accredited ETQA.
  • Assessors should be in possession of a relevant Qualification at NQF Level 5 or higher. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  252155  Analyse the facts and context of an incident in order to make a decision relating to polygraph examinations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  252163  Apply knowledge of anatomy and physiology to polygraph examinations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
    Core  252162  Conduct a polygraph examination  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  252166  Demonstrate knowledge and insight into the methodology of polygraphy examinations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Core  252147  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of human behaviour that has implications for polygraph examinations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  252158  Research international trends in polygraphy and related ethical issues  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  252165  Research the origins and use of polygraphy  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Fundamental  117456  Conduct an Investigative Interview  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  15093  Demonstrate insight into democracy as a form of governance and its implications for a diverse society  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  244570  Demonstrate knowledge and application of efficient study skills  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  230070  Present an informed argument on a current issue in a business sector  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  242585  Analyse the dynamics of different interactive styles in client relationships  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  252026  Apply a systems approach to decision making  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  242714  Apply elementary statistical methods  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  243936  Apply restorative justice interventions in formal and informal contexts  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  252031  Apply the principles and concepts of emotional intelligence to the management of self and others  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  242707  Assimilate and present specialised evidence in a court of law  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  243264  Customise an anti-corruption strategy at operational level for a Public Sector Department  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  15096  Demonstrate an understanding of stress in order to apply strategies to achieve optimal stress levels in personal and work situations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  15094  Demonstrate insight into the application of theories of Emotional and Spiritual Intelligence in personal development  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  243939  Demonstrate knowledge of crime prevention within a Victim Empowerment context  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  123483  Evaluate the effects of counter-xenophobia and non-racism on a work environment  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  252021  Formulate recommendations for a change process  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  11984  Give evidence in a court of law  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  114226  Interpret and manage conflicts within the workplace  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  116488  Justify disclosure or non-disclosure of information in an ethical framework  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  252040  Manage the finances of a unit  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  244254  Manage the mainstreaming of gender in programmes and projects  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Elective  12140  Recruit and select candidates to fill defined positions  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  243940  Coordinate the development of an information-based crime prevention strategy  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Elective  252156  Demonstrate knowledge and application of the polygraph examination process as a correctional release and monitoring mechanism  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Elective  252153  Quality assure a polygraph process  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



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