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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

National Certificate: Arts and Culture Enterprise 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
57612  National Certificate: Arts and Culture Enterprise 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Art, Craft & Design 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
CATHSSETA - Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Education and Training Authority  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Certificate  Field 02 - Culture and Arts  Cultural Studies 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  161  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2023-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2024-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

The purpose of this qualification is for learners to be able to manage the various functions of an Arts and Culture enterprise's output. The National Certificate in Arts and Culture Enterprise (NQF Level 5) is generic to the various fields within the Arts and Culture industry and applies to but is not limited to specific fields.

Apart from the competencies gained, other advantages of the qualification to learners include recognition, mobility, standardisation, and a broad competency base across areas (some of which are generic).

Qualifying learners are capable of:
  • Communicating in variety of ways to manage an Arts and Culture enterprise.
  • Controlling and maintaining administrative and financial procedures.
  • Supervising projects and processes of the Arts and Culture enterprise.
  • Strategically positioning an Arts and Culture enterprise.
  • Managing human resources to promote an optimal level of productivity.
  • Strategising and planning for the sustainability and growth of an Arts and Culture enterprise.

    Rationale:

    The National Certificate: Arts and Culture Enterprise (NQF Level 5), is designed to meet the needs of those learners both employed or unemployed, who are already involved or wish to become involved in the field of Arts and Culture enterprise management. Target learners will enter this qualification with an Further Education and Training Certificate, which could be within the field of Arts and Culture. The learning pathway starts at NQF Level 1 in the fields of business studies, dance studies, dramatic arts etcetera and continues up to NQF Level 8, where qualified learners are able to add to the body of knowledge regarding Arts and Culture enterprise development and administration.

    There is a critical need within the Arts and Culture system for a qualification that combines technical, management and enterprise competencies (especially financial competencies). This qualification combines Financial, Generic, Marketing, Arts and Culture, and other enterprise and project competencies. A qualification with these competencies in the Arts and Culture system will enhance the quality, economic viability and sustainability of Arts and Culture enterprises. Previously it was typical in the Arts and Culture field that practitioners who are competent in other job areas were promoted to enterprise management level, but did not have enterprise management experience or training.

    The qualification will standardise enterprise coordination practice throughout the Arts and Culture industry and provide a bigger pool of competence for key role players. Qualified learners will have mobility across sectors and across industries (project management and enterprise management skills in particular enhance mobility within and between sectors and industries). Areas of competence acquired by learners who have completed this qualification include: finance, human resources, marketing, sales, programming, research, and technical (outside programming). Qualified learners will be mentors and impart skills to others within the enterprise. Overall enterprise management and entrepreneurship competence will be developed. The qualification also allows for the recognition of prior learning. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    The following learning is recommended to be in place upon commencement of the qualification:
  • Basic computing, for example: Word processing, Spreadsheets, NQF Level 3.
  • Basic Project Management, NQF Level 4.

    Recognition of prior learning (RPL)

    This qualification can be achieved wholly, or in part, through recognition of prior learning. Evidence can be presented in a variety of forms, including previous international or local qualifications, reports, testimonials, mentoring, functions performed, portfolios, work records and performance records. As such, evidence should be judged according to the general principles of assessment described in the notes to assessors below. Learners who have met the requirements of any Unit Standard that forms part of this qualification may apply for recognition of prior learning to the relevant Education and Training Quality Assurance body (ETQA). The applicant must be assessed against the specific outcomes and with the assessment criteria for the relevant Unit Standards. A qualification will be awarded should a learner demonstrate that the exit level outcomes of the qualification have been attained.

    Access to the qualification

    Access to this qualification is open, although it is strongly recommended that learners have the competencies listed under Learning Assumed to be in Place. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    All the Fundamental (15 credits) and Core Component (121 credits) Unit Standards are compulsory (136 credits).
    For the Elective Component learners are required to attain 25 credits out of 32 credits. 

    EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    Core:

    1. Communicate in variety of ways to manage an Arts and Culture enterprise.
    Range: Communication includes report writing.
    2. Control and maintain administrative and financial procedures.
    3. Supervise projects and processes of the Arts and Culture enterprise.
    4. Strategically position an Arts and Culture enterprise.
    5. Manage and support human resources in accordance with legislation to promote an optimal level of productivity.
    6. Strategise and plan for the sustainability and growth of an Arts and Culture enterprise.

    Elective: (8 required to qualify)

    1. Develop advanced business and marketing strategies.
    2. Manage the exportation of Arts and Culture products. 

    ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Core:

    1.
  • Communication within and outside of the organisation is facilitated which is correct, appropriate and to the benefit of the organisation.
  • Resources can be procured through appropriate communication.
  • Prices for materials and resources are negotiated.
  • Tender documents are completed according to requirements.

    2.
  • A suitable documentation and administrative system appropriate for an enterprise has been designed.
  • Records are kept according to set principles to ensure easy access to correct information.
  • Legal principles that apply to the industry have been adhered to.
  • Financial controls, including operational budgets, cash flow budget are maintained for the enterprise.

    3.
  • Resources are commissioned for optimal benefit to the enterprise.
  • Resources are maintained at an effective and efficient level.
  • Staff development is facilitated in line with legislation and the needs of the enterprise.
  • Projects are planned and supervised to ensure optimal delivery within specific time frames and to meet relevant regulatory requirements.

    4.
  • Location and facilities are secured to suit the needs of the enterprise.
  • Projects are designed and executed to achieve the desired result.
  • Branding is included in the design of a marketing campaign to establish a sustainable enterprise given international and local Arts and Culture trends.
  • Unique Selling Propositions of the enterprise are optimally communicated to the target market.

    5
  • A team is recruited, selected and placed to optimally match the Human Resource needs.
  • Training needs are accurately identified for the entire enterprise team.
  • Human Resources contracts are customised to suit the needs of the enterprise.
  • Organisational and employee rights are protected according to labour legislation.
  • Safe and environmentally friendly work practices are implemented.

    6.
  • Strategic plans are put in place to improve the enterprise.
  • Quality control and inspection systems are put in place, which allows for checks and balances.
  • Production is in line with the strategic plan of the enterprise.
  • The need of subcontractors is identified accurately.

    Elective: (8 required to qualify)

    1.
  • The business objectives of an organisation are identified and an indication is given of how the achievement of business objectives is measured.
  • Business strategy is effectively communicated in a small business.
  • The target market is identified and accurately defined.
  • Products are optimally positioned in the market place.

    2.
  • Exportation of products are comprehensively planned.
  • Providers of appropriate international logistical services and modes of transport are selected.
  • Payment terms are negotiated with foreign buyers and trade finance arranged effectively.
  • Statutory requirements (customs, port, health, import control) are complied with.

    Integrated assessment

    The assessment criteria in the unit standards are performance-based, assessing applied competence, rather than only underpinning knowledge, or only skills. The critical cross-field outcomes are also achieved in the unit standards. In addition to the competence assessed to achieve the unit standards, learners must demonstrate that they can achieve the outcomes in an integrated manner, dealing effectively with different and random demands related to occupational and learning contexts, to qualify, and assessment approaches used should be appropriate for assessing applied competence. Integrated assessment is meaningful if there are clear relationships between the purpose statement, exit level outcomes and integrated assessment of this qualification.

    Learners who qualify must be able to integrate concepts, ideas and behaviours across unit standards to achieve the purpose of the qualification. Evidence (as specified in the associated assessment criteria) is required that the learner is able to achieve the exit level outcomes of the qualification as a whole and in an integrated way, and thus its purpose, at the time of the award of the qualification.

    Evidence of integration may be presented by learners when being assessed against the unit standards, and separate assessment for integration may not be necessary. Workplace experience can be recognised when assessing towards this qualification. Integrated assessment should include observable performance as well as the quality of thinking behind such performance. Formative assessment can be employed during learning towards the unit standards and during integration to achieve exit level outcomes, to ensure that integration takes place when summative assessment is employed. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    SADEC countries (Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Lesotho, Madagascar - membership pending, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe) generally combine training related to Arts and Culture enterprises with Commerce, Education, Religious Studies or Science. In Madagascar none of the six universities offer programmes in the art or business fields. No information is available regarding programmes at the level of this South African qualification for Angola, Zimbabwe and Zambia. In Botswana, providers offer, for example, African Languages and Literature, Civil Engineering, Computer Science, Environmental Science, History and Mechanical Engineering programmes at the level of this qualification (e.g. University of Botswana) but not arts and culture-related qualifications.

    In the Seychelles, the University of Seychelles - American Institute of Medicine offers medical programmes only. No art or business related programmes were found. There are also no programmes presented at the seven main institutions offering programmes at this level in Mozambique. Institutions do not offer arts qualifications, and economics and management programmes are at degree level or higher. The University of Namibia offers a degree in Fine Arts, and a degree in Business Administration, but does not combine the programmes, or offer an equivalent of this South African qualification. In the Democratic Republic of Congo one potentially equivalent programme was found: Gestion des Enterprises (Business Management and Administration). However, this is a two-year programme that does not contain any art and culture specific subjects. Similarly, no providers were found for art and culture specific programmes in Lesotho. Again, the National University of Lesotho, for example, offers general business management and administration programmes of three to four years.

    In Malawi, most programmes on offer are vocational. No art and culture specific programmes were found, but commerce programmes for management and business administration are offered (no programme information was available). Programmes offered in Mauritius are mostly at post graduate level, and at the level of this South African qualification only general management programmes are offered. Programmes focus on public sector management and business administration with a Diploma in Business Administration being the closest equivalent of this qualification (no programme information was available). Most education and training qualifications in Mauritius are awarded after summative assessments (national examinations) from India, the United Kingdom, South Africa and Australia.

    In Swaziland, the University of Swaziland offers a Diploma in Commerce (i.e. the first three years of 4-year degree), with streams in marketing or management. The latter is comparable with this South African qualification, except that it does not address arts and culture, and is longer. It includes business finance, business policy and strategic management, production management, training management, personnel management, industrial relations and labour law, small enterprise management and information systems. The differences between this qualification and the South African one relate to the inclusion of project management, HIV/AIDS counsel (albeit elective), safety, health and environmental protection (elective), exporting (elective) and arts and culture-related competence in the South African qualification. The Swaziland qualification includes information systems and production management, not directly addressed in the South African qualification.

    Tanzanian programmes are generally at a higher level than the South African qualification, and include business administration degrees with, for example, a focus on marketing or entrepreneurship (e.g. Mzumbe University). One business administration certificate was found, for which no programme details were available.

    Most international listings of courses in arts and culture enterprise, administration or management refer to programmes in France, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States of America. Arts and culture enterprise training programmes in France focus on general management training, and Italian programmes focus on selection, management and motivation of volunteers. Canadian programmes exist that are comparable to this South African qualification in terms of complexity and duration. The Canadian Certificate in Arts and Culture Management compares as follows with this South African qualification:

    Canadian Certificate in Arts and Culture Management:
  • Learning techniques, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Oral and written communication, SA Qualification: Integrated.
  • Business fundamentals, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Organisational behaviour, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Professional practice, SA Qualification: Core.

    Elective (3 required)
  • Accounting, SA Qualification: Core and Elective.
  • Business law, SA Qualification: Core (integrated).
  • Consulting, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Facilitation of groups meetings and workshops, SA Qualification: Core (integrated).
  • Essential skills for managers, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Financial management for non-financial managers, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Information technology for non-IT managers, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Marketing, SA Qualification: Elective.
  • Human resource management, SA Qualification: Core and Elective.
  • Project management, SA Qualification: Core and Elective.
  • Conflict management, SA Qualification: Not included.

    Other shorter Canadian programmes provide learners with credits towards, for example, a Bachelor of Professional Arts - Communication Studies (e.g. Athabasca University), or a Management Studies Diploma (e.g. Grant MacEwan College). Typically, the short courses compare as follows with the components of the South African qualification:

    Canadian Short Courses:
  • Advocacy and lobbying, SA Qualification: Fundamental (generic).
  • Marketing principles in the arts, SA Qualification: Elective.
  • Research in the arts, SA Qualification: Fundamental.
  • Financial management for the arts, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Computer applications in the arts, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Management, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Communications, SA Qualification: Integrated.
  • Publicity and media relations in the arts, SA Qualification: Elective.
  • Applied marketing in the arts, SA Qualification: Elective.
  • Human resource management in the arts, SA Qualification: Core and Elective.
  • Facility management, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Museum/gallery management, SA Qualification: Integrated.
  • Fundraising and grants, SA Qualification: Core.

    The United States of America and Australian programmes in Arts and Culture enterprise are similar, but at higher (or in the case of Australia, also lower) levels than this qualification. In Japan most arts and culture enterprise qualifications are offered as art management programmes (e.g. Shizuoka University of Art and Culture) and are generally offered as three-year first degrees. First year exit compares as follows with this South African qualification:

    Japan:
  • Source Readings in Performing Arts, SA Qualification: Fundamental.
  • Source Readings in Visual Arts, SA Qualification: Fundamental.
  • Introduction to the Ideas of Corporate Philanthropy, SA Qualification: Fundamental (integrated).
  • Aesthetics, SA Qualification: Fundamental (integrated).
  • Appreciation and Criticism, SA Qualification: Fundamental (integrated).
  • Appreciation of Music, SA Qualification: Fundamental (integrated).
  • Appreciation of Stage Art, SA Qualification: Fundamental (integrated).
  • Appreciation of Visual Arts, SA Qualification: Fundamental (integrated).
  • Artistic Features, SA Qualification: Fundamental (integrated).
  • Arts and Society, SA Qualification: Fundamental (integrated).
  • Culture of Arts I (Performing Arts), SA Qualification: Fundamental (integrated).
  • Media Art, SA Qualification: Fundamental (integrated).
  • Taste and Society, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Cultural Economics, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • History of Theatre, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • History of Traditional Arts, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • History of Western Art I, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Information as Culture, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Modern Art Theory, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Philosophy of Music, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Philosophy of Music: Western I, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Stage Art I, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Theory of Performing Arts, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Visual Media Arts, SA Qualification: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Comparative Study of Arts Policy, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Basic Arts Management, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Cultural Planning, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Introduction to Arts Management, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Introduction to Arts Policy, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Management of Cultural Institutions I, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Introduction to Japanese Enterprise Management, SA Qualification: Core (generic).
  • Cultural Law, SA Qualification: Core (integrated).
  • Introduction to Marketing, SA Qualification: Elective.
  • Issues in Art Marketing, SA Qualification: Elective.
  • Art Education: Methods and Media, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Conservation and Restoration of Art Works I, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Fundamentals in Designing Exhibitions I, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • History of Japanese Art I, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Modern Society and Design, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Performance of Music and Dance, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Philosophy of Music: Japan, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Photographic Art, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Stage Setting, SA Qualification: Not included.

    Other countries for which arts and culture enterprise programmes were found include the West Indies, France, Latvia, Portugal, Hungary, Armenia, Estonia and New Zealand.

    At the University of the West Indies, a Postgraduate Diploma in Arts and Cultural Enterprise Management is offered. In Singapore the Asian Institute of Management offers a Certificate: Managing the Arts (no programme information was available). In France, the HEC Paris offers a degree with an Arts and Culture Management major, building on general management principles (taught in previous years) by investigating aspects specific to the cultural sector, including the economics of Art and Culture, history of art and aesthetic trends, cultural management job descriptions, legal aspects of Arts Management, managing talent and networks, marketing and consumer behaviour, and strategy. All these aspects are addressed in the South African qualification.

    The Latvia College of Culture offers first level professional higher education programs in arts and culture management, including Management of culture with specializations in Culture tourism, Amateur theatre direction, and Festival direction, Contemporary dance, Amateur theatre direction, Tourism management, Advertising management in the culture sphere, and Library science and information. The Management of culture programme requires learners to be able to direct content quality, understand culture and manage cultural projects. The South African qualification covers all these aspects in an integrated way.

    The Gestão das Artes, at the Instituto Nacional de Administração in Portugal offers a course in arts management at consulting and master level to arts professionals. In Hungary, short seminars and workshops are run regarding arts management, arts law, management and philanthropy for the arts, culture in civil society, etc.

    Armenian arts and culture enterprise training programmes focus on promoting management in transition, fundraising, sustainability, cultural tourism and policy, markets and economics, contemporary problems, strategic thinking for arts and culture development, art-therapy, computer literacy, organisation of arts and culture events, arts and culture management (including financial management and legal issues), marketing in arts and culture, and English. Estonian programmes are mostly shorter than this South African qualification, and include arts management, organisational knowledge and skills for managing various cultural activities, leadership in arts and culture management, and managing and marketing arts projects. Most of these aspects are covered in the South African qualification, except art-therapy, which is part of a different field in South Africa.

    No full qualification comparable to the National Certificate in Arts and Culture Enterprise, NQF Level 5 exists on the New Zealand framework, although there are a number of unit standards. The table below lists equivalent level unit standards from New Zealand compared to the unit standards in this qualification:

    New Zealand Unit Standards:
  • Communicate intentions through presentation of craft, art, and design work, SA Qualification: Fundamental.
  • Manage financial practices for craft, art, and design projects, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Examine marketing strategies for craft, art, and design work, SA Qualification: Elective.
  • Identify legal practices relating to craft, art, and design practices, SA Qualification: Core (integrated).
  • Produce an analysis of copyright law in terms of visual arts practice, SA Qualification: Core (integrated).
  • Analyse, implement, and evaluate design process and principles within craft and art practice, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Examine exhibition and commission contracts in terms of art practice, SA Qualification: Partially, Core.
  • Install site specific display of own art work, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Participate in a craft, art, and design project team, SA Qualification: Core.
  • Produce craft, art, and design work to communicate influences on personal identity, SA Qualification: Not included.
  • Research resource issues that impact on craft, art, and design practice in Aotearoa-New Zealand, SA Qualification: Partially, Fundamental (generic).
  • Research the relationship between craft, art, and design, society and personal practice, SA Qualification: Fundamental.

    Few programmes are offered at the level of this qualification. Nonetheless, it compares well with international offerings at this level, with the main difference being that the South African qualification does not credit arts and culture practice (e.g. performing arts) competence, as it is either considered as learning assumed to be in place or addressed in other South African qualifications that have a specific purpose to require arts and culture practice competence. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    Vertical articulation is possible with:
  • Local Economic Development (NQF Level 6) ID: 36437.

    Horizontal articulation on the NQF is possible with:
  • The National Certificate: Craft Operations Management (NQF Level 5) ID: 49119.
  • National Certificate: Management and Administration (NQF Level 5) ID: 49126.
  • National Diploma: Human Resources Management and Practices (NQF Level 5) ID: 49692.
  • National Certificate: Local Economic Development (NQF Level 5) ID: 36438.
  • National Certificate: Business Advising (NQF Level 5) ID: 48886.
  • National Certificate: Management (NQF Level 5) ID: 24493.
  • National Certificate: Labour Relations Practice (NQF Level 5) ID: 48641.
  • National Certificate: Organisational Transformation and Change Management (NQF Level 5) ID: 49075. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
    Moderation of assessment and accreditation of providers shall be at the discretion of a relevant ETQA as long as it complies with the SAQA requirements. The ETQA is responsible for moderation of learner achievements who meet the requirements of this qualification. Particular moderation and accreditation requirements are:
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA. Providers offering learning towards achievement of any of the unit standards that make up this qualification must also be accredited through the relevant ETQA accredited by SAQA.
  • The ETQA will oversee assessment and moderation of assessment according to their policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation, or in terms of agreements reached around assessment and moderation between the relevant ETQA and other ETQAs and in terms of the moderation guideline detailed here.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments for the qualification, unless the relevant ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described in Unit Standards as well as the integrated competence described in the qualification.
  • Internal moderation of assessment must take place at the point of assessment with external moderation provided by a relevant ETQA according to the moderation guidelines and the agreed ETQA procedures.
  • Anyone wishing to be assessed against this qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Assessment of learner achievements takes place at providers accredited by the relevant ETQA (RSA, 1998b) for the provision of programs that result in the outcomes specified for this qualification. Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against this qualification must be registered as an assessor with the ETQA. Assessors registered with the relevant ETQA must carry out the assessment of learners for the qualification and any of the Unit Standards that make up this qualification.

    To register as an assessor, the following are required:
  • Detailed documentary proof of relevant qualification/s, practical training completed, and experience gained at a NQF level above the level of this qualification.
  • NQF recognised assessor credit.

    Assessors should keep the following general principles in mind when designing and conducting assessments:
  • Focus the initial assessment activities on gathering evidence in terms of the main outcomes expressed in the titles of the Unit Standards to ensure assessment is integrated rather than fragmented. The learner must be declared competent in terms of the qualification purpose and exit level outcomes.
  • Where assessment across Unit Standard titles or at Unit Standard title level is unmanageable, then focus assessment around each specific outcome, or groups of specific outcomes. Take special note of the need for integrated assessment.
  • Make sure evidence is gathered across the entire range, wherever it applies.

    In particular, assessors should assess that the learner demonstrates an ability to consider a range of options by:
  • Measuring the quality of the observed practical performance as well as the theory and underpinning knowledge.
  • Using methods that are varied to allow the learner to display thinking and decision making in the demonstration of practical performance.
  • Maintaining a balance between practical performance and theoretical assessment methods to ensure each is measured in accordance with the level of the qualification.
  • Taking into account that the relationship between practical and theoretical components is not fixed, but varies according to the type and level of qualification.

    All assessments should be conducted in line with the following well-documented principles:
  • Appropriate: The method of assessment is suited to the performance being assessed.
  • Fair: The method of assessment does not present any barriers to achievements, which are not related to the evidence.
  • Manage: The methods used make for easily arranged cost-effective assessments that do not unduly interfere with learning.
  • Integrate into work or learning: Evidence collection is integrated into the work or learning process where this is appropriate and feasible.
  • Valid: The assessment focuses on the requirements laid down in the standards; i.e. the assessment is fit for purpose.
  • Direct: The activities in the assessment mirror the conditions of actual performance as close as possible.
  • Authentic: The assessor is satisfied that the work being assessed is attributable to the learner being assessed.
  • Sufficient: The evidence collected establishes that all criteria have been met and that performance to the required Standard can be repeated consistently.
  • Systematic: Planning and recording is sufficiently rigorous to ensure that assessment is fair.
  • Open: Learners can contribute to the planning and accumulation of evidence. Learners for assessment understand the assessment process and the criteria that apply.
  • Consistent: The same assessor would make the same judgement again in similar circumstances. The judgement made is similar than the judgement that would be made by other assessors. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  242644  Analyse policy needs and organisational policies  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  15232  Coordinate planned skills development interventions in an organisation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  114274  Demonstrate and apply an understanding of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act (Act 75 of 1997)  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  114278  Demonstrate and apply an understanding of the Labour Relations Act (Act 66 of 1995)  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
    Core  10043  Develop, implement and manage a project/activity plan  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  15226  Implement systems to meet the flow of information in a team, department or division  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  242649  Manage physical resources  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Core  242650  Manage project finances  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Core  110531  Plan, organise and control the day-to-day administration of an office support function  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  10148  Supervise a project team of a business project to deliver project objectives  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  14 
    Core  120378  Support the project environment and activities to deliver project objectives  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  14 
    Core  12134  Manage a communications project  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  15 
    Fundamental  242646  Conceptualise and present a project concept  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Elective  120385  Apply a range of project management tools and techniques  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  13942  Demonstrate a basic understanding of the role of a business strategy in managing a small business or a business unit  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  10016  Demonstrate an understanding of product positioning  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  120381  Implement project administration processes according to requirements  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  13224  Monitor the application of safety, health and environmental protection procedures  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114585  Plan strategically to improve business performance  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  13203  Counsel workgroup members in respect of HIV/AIDS  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.